Inproved car rear brake lining?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2012: Inproved car rear brake lining?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Or on Saturday, February 11, 2012 - 12:20 pm:

What thickness should the lining be new, or range?
Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset England on Saturday, February 11, 2012 - 12:22 pm:

Good question. I bought new linings last year and they were no thicker than the worn ones I replaced. I guess they are about 3/16"
But they did have less oil on them!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Stephan on Saturday, February 11, 2012 - 01:12 pm:

The linings are 3/16 X 1-1/2 I bought some 2" wide stuff at the CarQuest motor parts in town here. The total for the two lengths was $50 PLUS the rivets! Depending on the material, Id now buy the correct kit. I had to waste 1/2" on the width. Was easy enough to cut with a sabre saw. The stuff I took off was disintegrated cotton junk on one side and a piece of leather belt on the other. YIKES! The new stuff grabs like heck, but I did hafta grind 1/32 off the shoe cam contact... too tight! Theres an ever so slight drag right now and after a few blocks should wear right in. ws


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert C.(Bob) Borden on Saturday, February 11, 2012 - 06:31 pm:

another question on 26/27 rear brake linings.
Has any one used modern brake lining material?
I have my 27 coupe set up with the equalizer so that the primary braking is done at the rear wheels not on the trans. drum. would there be any advantage/disadvantage or danger to relining with the modern material?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Stephan on Saturday, February 11, 2012 - 07:00 pm:

See above! Thats non asbestos with some minute brass slivers to ease on the aggressive friction action. This is what we line hoist brakes with. ws


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Money, Braidwood, IL on Saturday, February 11, 2012 - 07:29 pm:

Keep in mind that modern lining is designed to be used with pressure far exceeding what you are applying with your mechanical brakes. I have a friend that had that done and the brakes do not stop anywhere near what the correct type lining do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Or on Saturday, February 11, 2012 - 09:40 pm:

Great, thank you! That is just the size of the lining I have been saving for 30 years or more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen Heatherly on Saturday, February 11, 2012 - 11:49 pm:

Bill those linings should be attached with brass tube rivets not the split type.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry A. Woods on Sunday, February 12, 2012 - 12:06 am:

R.D. Ricks needs to chime in on this thread. He once told me that he had a new type of lining that was bonded or glued to 26-27 brake shoes and they didn't wear as much as other things that he had tried and stopped better, too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, February 12, 2012 - 03:27 am:

Stephan, does it make any difference what type of rivet is used if they are clinched on the inside of the shoe as long as they are countersunk? Just curious. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert C.(Bob) Borden on Sunday, February 12, 2012 - 11:43 am:

The modern composite brake lining is designed to work by converting the energy of the cars forward motion into heat which is accomplished by the friction of the lining on the cast brake drum.
The rear brake of the T was designed as a stationary parking brake, essentially preventing the pressed steel drum from rotating (no conversion of energy). This brings up 2 questions;1)will the linings provide enough friction to generate the required heat? 2)Will the pressed brake drums stand up to the friction and heat ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Sunday, February 12, 2012 - 12:35 pm:

OK, a bit of heresy here. If you want to use the rear wheel brakes on a large drum axle as service brakes, you could use a set of drums with cast braking surface rather than the original pressed steel drums. For wire wheels, the mid 50's Mercury drums are 11" and have the same bolt pattern. For wood wheel hubs, you may need to redrill some drums. I did that with some late 20's vintage Chevy drums.

I have not completed the conversion yet (other projects) but the drums don't look too out of place unless you are a T guy looking for things that are wrong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset England on Sunday, February 12, 2012 - 01:00 pm:

Robert C, (Bob)'s second question is a good one. The Kinetic energy of the car's motion has to be converted into heat, and the pressed drums don't have much thermal capacity (weight). More worryingly, they are in intimate contact with wooden spokes. Also, I met a Model A expert who always fitted steel or iron rings shrunk around the outside of his Model A drums because when they got hot, they expanded and the pedal went to the floor. I guess this could happen with T drums. The handbrake of my '26 is very effective - it will lock the wheels if required without difficulty. I'm just worried about repeated or prolonged usage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Stephan on Sunday, February 12, 2012 - 01:30 pm:

Somerset CB... thats my intention of use as well. As usual, this has turned into a class on quantum physics. All I need is a parking brake, and God forbid, barring a brake band, reverse band, u-joint or differential failure, one controlled stop before the tow truck arrives.
As a kid, we had a 26 "Rat Find" touring car at our cottage. It had ONE wore out shoe and no rod on the other side. While visiting some friends house on a tall hill, me, the kid, hopped in the car and grabbed the wheel. She started rolling backwards down the hill. A half mile down was the lake. I learned two things that day as a 5 year old. The brake pedal is on the right, and how to park a model T with lousy parking brakes on a hill. I use that technique to this day. ws


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Stephan on Sunday, February 12, 2012 - 01:31 pm:

BTW... the linings are bonded as well as riveted. ws


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, February 12, 2012 - 08:58 pm:

The brake lining has a friction surface against the shoe as well as one against the drum. The rivets really just have to add a little extra. The split rivets will work just fine. Mine have for the last 8 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, February 13, 2012 - 01:06 am:

One old brakeman's rule. Brass rivets only. Brass plated steel rivets won't do. Even plated, the steel rivets rust, providing an abrasive which embeds in the lining and grinds a groove around the drum. Not always. But a bad thing when they do.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H on Monday, February 13, 2012 - 05:47 pm:

I've always used the rear drums for most of the braking in my 26 tourer without any ill effect from the "incorrect" kind of drums. And I drive fast and stop quick, plus go down lots of hills. The 2nd hand original linings have been in for the last nine years and look like they have a long time before wearing out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison on Saturday, February 25, 2012 - 09:50 pm:

What adhesive can be used for the lining? I can't find any for sale except in large quantities.


Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode - Onalaska, WA, USA on Saturday, February 25, 2012 - 09:55 pm:

Phil,
I've used JB weld for gluing linings on with good results. It is good to 500 degrees and should be strong enough.
Jim


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration