OT - 1907 MoToR magazine contest final result - Eric H., you were right.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: OT - 1907 MoToR magazine contest final result - Eric H., you were right.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 04:49 pm:

Well, not what I hoped for, but still a remarkable contest with interesting results.

Eric Hylen suggested that Mrs. Chapin would receive a Model N because of four 1st place winners. Since we already knew she received a Ford, I thought she was selected as the 1st place finisher, and would have chosen the "big" Ford. However, it looks alike at least two of the finalists received cars, a Maxwell and Ford N.

What we learned from this "investigation":

1. We'll probably never know what vehicle Mrs Chapin or Mr. Semnacher chose.

2. We know first prize was "split" between at least two of the final four winners.

3. Most importantly (in my opinion) the Ford was the fifth choice of cars costing $3000 or less, following a Thomas, Franklin, Stoddard Dayton and Locomobile, with over 6500 contestants "voting".


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The top winning contestants. Both Mrs. Chapin and Mr. Semnacher are in the top four.


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And the final result. Hard to read but Mrs. Chapin mentions how MoToR used "subsequent diplomacy and absolute fairness" tells me there was a negotiation to arrive at prizes. I'm unable to determine what Mr. Semnacher's comments are, although they are much more brief (I can only imagine, thinking you deserve one of the above listed marquees, and getting the two cylinder Maxwell :-( )


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I hope you all enjoyed this "mystery". I'm sure there will be more to follow :-)

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 06:56 pm:

Rob-
The photo caption reads, "Mrs. H.S. Chapin in her Ford runabout, which she won in MoToR's Motor Puzzle. It sure looks like a Model R to me.

The caption under Mr. Semnacher's picture states he won a Maxwell runabout.

I wouldn't be disappointed to win either of them...

I wish you could show her letter larger.

Fun stuff!

: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 11:12 pm:

Keith,

Found a better copy:

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 11:48 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 01:25 am:

Amazing. I would have expected Motor Magazine to have had some other way and awarded a single first prize. However, a lesser prize to each of the four does seem to be a good way to go. It sounds as though they had to do some negotiating to accomplish this.
I wonder what the other two people got? No Rob, this is not a challenge.
Thank you for sharing all this.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 01:33 am:

Wayne,

"Ask, and you shall receive" :-)

Look what I found! Seems MoToR awarded all four first places a lesser car.

Rob
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 08:27 am:

For Bob -- Great job of “sleuthing!” Also thank you for sharing the rest of the story even when it did not turn out as you had originally hoped. I have read about a few research efforts that when the answer did not support what the “boss” was looking for, the “boss” deleted and/or modified certain information. The classic one I read was the initial brake design for a new aircraft. The data showed the brakes were too small for the weight of the aircraft. If you poured water on the brakes while testing them they ran cooler than during dry testing and the temperatures were now within the design specifications. They finally increased the size of the brakes – but only because the test aircraft landed and no one was pouring water on the brakes.

For Keith – yes, the photo graph is of a 1907 Ford Model R Runabout. A couple of key indicators that support your conclusion is correct:

First the photo was published Jul 1907 (and sent to the magazine in a letter dated Jun 1907). The first documented shipments of the Model S Runabouts started Aug 16, 1907 (ref Trent’s Early Database – available in “Pate’s Early Ford Automobile Encyclopedia” on the DVD as well as Bruce McCalley’s “Model T Comprehensive Encyclopedia.”

Second when the Model S Runabout was first introduced Ford painted the chassis with cream color wheels, axles, wishbones instead of the dark green/Brewster green that the Model R chassis and body were painted. [Note the with the exception of the 28 inch wheels on the S Runabout and the 30 inch wheels on the R Runabout the paint was the only other difference in the chassis. Same engine, transmission, oiler, fenders, running boards etc.] And the car in the photo has the dark wheels, axles, wishbone to match the body. While it could have been repainted – I believe it is highly unlikely that anyone would repaint the chassis of the brand new car they had just one.

Note also that the other Ford prize was listed as a Model R Runabout. And the Model N, Model R, and Model S were all offered as a Runabout. (There was also a Model S Roadster (SR) which had its own serial number sequence of engine and car numbers and there were approximately 28 or so S Coupes that used the S Runabout serial numbers and one or two SR serial numbered Landaulets).

Again Rob --- thanks for sharing your adventure in time travel.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 10:59 am:

I know this whole series of posts isn't really about Model Ts. But, I just love seeing and reading these old publications. This information greatly improves the overall antique car hobby.

I'd love to own either of the cars pictured above. Heck, I'd even take one of those unreliable, poor selling Model K Fords that Henry despised. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 01:01 pm:

Eric, don't get me started :-).

Hap, have you seen a breakdown on the number of NRS & K exports? During my recent searches, I'm finding quite a few instances of Models N and K in foreign countries. This seems especially true in Europe.

Here is another contest if anyone would like to take the "challenge". (Eric, a chance to get that Maxwell you've been looking for)
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 01:50 pm:

Rob

What kind of search engine are you using? I know you are not doing it on your iPhone.

It is enjoyable to see what you have been able to find. Nice winter project.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 04:51 pm:

I bet Rob is correct in assuming that Mrs. Chapin wanted the Model K. Who wouldn't? It was a well built, prestigious car from an established company with a reputation for building reliable cars. In evaluating the Model K, we need to remember that Ford had not yet established their reputation as the builder of the "Tin Lizzie". They were a company, much like REO, that was testing the market to see where their future led. REO also offered a small, low-priced runabout along with their larger touring car. They were in very close competition with Ford in this pre-T time period. Eventually, their path led them to focus on larger cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 05:20 pm:

Eric,
Throw Maxwell, Buick, Cadillac and Olds into that group too. I believe Ford needed a touring car or else they would have performed as only a small two passenger maker (Brush comes to mind)..

Also, I didn't think the odds were too good on the contest winner choosing Ford (odds on the Thomas were 777/6500, on the K 384/6500), but then I saw the bit on the later add where Mrs. Chapin said "awarded the Ford".

Needless to say I was exited! U wish we knew what the four winners choices were.

I'm gathering Ford race results now, should I post them or is everyone tired of pre T stuff?

Ron

From my iPhone

Dave,
Mostly google on my iPad for searches. I did get help from Matt at the AACA museum on the 2nd contest winner.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 07:06 pm:

I, for one, will NEVER tire of pre-T stuff.
I know everyone knows that. But I just have to say it. I also firmly believe that learning more about the pre-Ts helps us to understand how the model T came into being, and perhaps appreciate the model T even more. I also did decide several years ago that I would never not have a model T again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 08:03 pm:

OK Wayne, it's your fault :-)

Also, you can see above, my iPhone constantly autocorrects my name to Ron. Maybe that's a good thing....

Ron (Rob)


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