Old Trees in the Pacific Northwest

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Old Trees in the Pacific Northwest
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 12:38 pm:

Found this picture in a PowerPoint demo that was running around. That T looks awfully small next to that tree!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 01:00 pm:

How do you suppose they got the two cars, the team and the wagon up there?

Neat photo, John. Thanks for posting it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 01:09 pm:

One end of the log must have been close enough to the ground to drive them up. or possibly a ramp was built.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 01:10 pm:

And that's not even photo- shopped


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve McClelland on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 02:20 pm:

I was just thinking about having to back the cars off the log! But then how in the crap did they back the team off the log.
Wonder how much thought they put into driving up on it before they did it...Lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill dugger on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 02:20 pm:

Norm: I started note and it went bye-bye.
In Sequoia Park near Giant Village there is/was a tree the I could and did drive my 51 Merc on it and got out and walked around it. I can't remember the name given it. One of the things about the Sequoia's is that they do not have a good root system and they are slow about re-seeding. They can stand a lot of fire from what has been said about them. Recently PBS did a story about them and that is where I saw the statement about re-seeding, and that they are very slow about producing seeds so there is not a lot of new growth of Sequoia's.
On the Coast Redwoods there is one at Redwood National Park the has been deemed the tallest in the world, and that is by Nat Geo some years ago. About 20 years ago were tried to find it but there are so many and I am not sure if they have it marked to prevent vandalism. Those in the Park are HUGE
Take care
Bill D


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill dugger on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 02:25 pm:

Steve: Those look like "Blue Mules" (that is what my Dad called), looking at the ears. A good team drive could back them off slowly and carefully.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 03:33 pm:

There is one in Sequoia National Park. I drove a 49 Cadillac on it many years ago, but I couldn't find the picture in the computer and was too lazy to look through all the albums of old pictures. It must have been about 40 years ago when we drove it there, so I don't know if they allow you to drive on it anymore. That picture sure looks like the same tree.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 04:07 pm:

Sequoias grow now only between about 6-7,000 feet elevation. It takes a fire to break the seeds out of their pods so they can germinate. It guess it's sort of a birth control.


We did this one in summer of 2001:


Don't remember source of this one.


Our vacation last summer...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 04:08 pm:

Oh, the Chandelier and Founders trees are Pacific Coast Redwoods, not Sequoias.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 04:12 pm:


Dad drove through in a Dodge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 04:49 pm:

Here is another of the "Auto Log"

"The Auto Log, Giant Forest," c. 1917.
Photo: Bancroft Library

A popular Sequoia National Park attraction, created in 1917 when Stephen Mather, first director of the National Park Service, converted the giant log into a photo stop to amuse tourists.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 08:06 pm:

Because of the slow germination of redwood seeds they have been working on a cloning project and will be planting the starts, if I recall from the report, this coming spring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Allen Vitko on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 09:00 pm:

I live fourteen to sixteen feet above sea level planted six giant red woods about six years ago. one is fourteen feet the rest vary down to six feet starting from two feet.
The difference is the soil mostly sand give those trees the right soil and they take over the swamp spruce height in a few years.
Love those trees low branches ever green nothing bothers them as long as the soil works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve McClelland on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 10:30 pm:

Bill
Glad I wasn't driving. I'd Sure hate to kill a good set of blue mules.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 11:11 pm:

Bill D,
I don't know about blue, but yes they are mules. Mules are smarter than horses, work harder, and a good old mule skinner can train them to do many things better than a horse. A horse can be pushed and will work himself to death, literally drop dead in his harness while pulling. A mule can be pushed hard, but will stop when he is too tired and there is almost nothing you can do to make him move until he has rested. Hence, the stubbornness of mules.

The original speedster photo that Ricks-SC posted is a 1915 Studebaker.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 11:49 pm:





Another vintage shot and a more recent image of the top side.


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