Look what followed me home

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Look what followed me home
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ronald lemmerman on Saturday, January 12, 2013 - 08:14 pm:



;-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Saturday, January 12, 2013 - 08:23 pm:

Lucky you!!!!!!!!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Saturday, January 12, 2013 - 08:34 pm:

Keep it up and you'll have more model T's than that guy down the road in Cherry Hill! :-)

Find that somewhat local?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ronald lemmerman on Saturday, January 12, 2013 - 09:18 pm:

In a barn in PA. Wanted a closed car and something with a little more space then the roadster. Got three kids to cart around


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Saturday, January 12, 2013 - 09:25 pm:

Ron,

Nice looking Centerdoor. When you have a chance please tell us more about it (what year, which body company produced the body -- Fisher or Wadsworth), etc. Sometimes (many time no) you will find a body number stamped into the wood or on a metal tag by lifting up the rear seat cushion and looking at the wooden seat frame. Also you may find a stamping on the wood sill on the passenger door area.

Below is an illustration of one area to check to help determine which company produced the body for Ford.





Also Bruce's (RIP) reprinted book "Model T Ford" and his "Model T Comprehensive Encyclopedia both have a good section on the Centerdoors. There are also several threads on them [caution -- we were wrong prior to Sep 6, 2009 about the indent -- and we are still learning lots more about the cars.] If you type in Centerdoor in the search feature they should pop up for you.

Again congratulations on your "new" T.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ronald lemmerman on Saturday, January 12, 2013 - 10:17 pm:

Looks like its a wadsworth body, 1920, unsure of motor # as tthere is a water pump blocking my view. Cant wait till tomorrow when i can get it cleaned up. Been sitting in a barn for the last seven years


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, January 12, 2013 - 10:35 pm:

Neat! Congratulations! A lot of that going on lately. A good thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, January 12, 2013 - 11:34 pm:

That will come in handy during cool weather.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 07:08 am:

Ron,

Thank you for checking and letting us know it is a Wadsworth body. Yes, the metal tag with the “W” would indicate that Wadsworth produced the body. When you have time would you please confirm it also has the "indent" at the bottom of the cowl and that the metal tag was located on the rear seat frame. I would "assume" all that is true, but I don't want to use it as a reference point until it is confirmed by someone.

As you check things out, many times you can figure out how the car was originally built and which parts were switched out or added later. For example, you mention a 1920 date. If the car was produced as a 1920 model year (made approximately Aug 1919 to Aug 1920 ref: http://mtfca.com/encyclo/1920.htm the car would not have originally been equipped from the factory with the oil side lamps. Why? Because ref: http://mtfca.com/encyclo/1919.htm that states: “The “1919” model year began in January 1919 with the introduction of the electrical equipment as standard in the closed cars.” And from the same web page/reference it says, “Side and tail lamps were similar to 1917 on the non-starter cars. Starter cars had a small electric tail light and did not have side lights.” I.e. the cars equipped with starters no longer came from the factory with the oil lamps (side or tail). So “if” the oil lamps came on the car originally it most likely would have been produced before Jan 1919 (i.e. a 1917-1918 year model car). Of course someone could have added the side lamps later. A lot of old car collectors like the way the oil lamps look. But checking other items on the car such as the coil box (does it have the switch on the coil box – that would have originally been on a non-starter car), engine serial number & casting date, front spring & engine bracket etc. While any of those could have also been changed out – they can often but not always give you and ideal of what was changed over time. And of course if there is any history on the car that is great. An early photo makes it easier to spot changes that occurred later etc.

And since it was sitting for several years, Milt’s checklist “Taking a T Out of Mothballs” should be a helpful guide to you. Tom Mullin posted a copy at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/8538.html and others have also reposted it as it helps us not skip something we should check.

Again – it looks like a great car.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Carter - South Jersey on Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 09:55 am:

Another T within within 10 miles of me? Exciting! I hope to see it out on the road sometime soon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 10:06 am:

Ronald, you could "age" that photo with your son behind the wheel & then post it on some website without explanation....within minutes I'll bet there will be people who start commenting about how "young" drivers could be back in the old days. It's a good photo.
Mike Sa


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 12:04 pm:

Ronald, Centerdoors make good family cars. If you are the tall side, entry to the drivers seat can be a little bit of a problem.
All that exposed wood around the windows makes the car look like it is one of the earlier years. Strap window lifts were used on all windows on the earlier models. Bail handles on the doors also indicate earlier cars.
The main body did little changing after 1915.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 12:53 pm:

A very long time ago, I was in College in Georgetown, Texas, at the time a tiny hamlet. I worked at a Filling Station, about the only one in town, and on Saturday two old Ladies (sisters) would drive their Center Door the few blocks from their home to "Town" to the Filling Station. There they would leave it and go circle the Town Square and do their looking and shopping, and I would wash and check the car over for them, then back home it went, to stay parked till the next trip to town. That was a NEW old car, wish I had it now. There was also an air cooled Franklin (?) in town there, another NEW old car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ronald lemmerman on Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 06:18 pm:

Hap- the body has the indent on it and the metal id tag was on the rear wood seat frame as suggested by you. The car currently has the oil side and tail light. It also has strap wimdow lifts and bail handles as mentioned by Willie. So i guess a little more research is necessary. The motor # appears to be 1080269 or 4080268. The earlier indicating 1916 and the latter 1920.

George- looks like im quickly catching up to that guy in Cherry Hill, and the gentleman i purchased it from has a few others he may sell....now where could i park a tt firetruck.... ;-)

Thanks for the input guys. Hope to have her up and running shortly


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 06:46 pm:

Ron -- The 1,080,xxx engine number was assembled in February of 1916, so its car would have a brass radiator, and different fenders and hood. It would be quite a bit of work to "update" a '16 with later fenders, hood, and radiator, but it was done sometimes after the "new" black cars came out in '17. A '16 engine would not have any provision for a generator (or starter), and a 1920 would have a place for a generator on the engine starter on the hogshead.

Closed cars didn't come with oil cowl lamps after the '19 model year, but for the past 50 years or so, cowl lamps were often added so the car "looks like a Model T". The tail lamp, not so much. Bail door handles were used through the '20 model year. You probably already know the wheels (and hubs) are '26-7 Ford parts. Those are easily changed of course, and they often are. My guess is that the car is a 1917 or '18, whereby everything in sight would be correct except for the wheels & hubs. Some more info regarding the starter and/or generator would help verify its vintage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Judy Edwards on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 04:14 pm:

Here is a picture of our 1918 center door.

JudyElizabeth-1918 Center Door


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 05:15 pm:

Ronald What a Shame, if l can assist you by taking that off your hands "just to help out " let me know, l'll spare you.

WOW what a great find.... Congratulations.

David.


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