The Model T Ford that sparked my interest in the Hobby: others feel free to share theirs

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: The Model T Ford that sparked my interest in the Hobby: others feel free to share theirs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 02:12 pm:

Hey guys. I thought it might be interesting to post about the T that started it all with me. My Grandmother and Grandfather used to babysit me a lot when I was a kid while my Mom and Dad worked. My Grandfather has a 1923 Model T Roadster. Man oh man did I and do I still love that roadster. I used to spend all day in it: flipping the lights on, polishing it for my grandfather (free labor :-) I didn't mind). I would curl up in its set and fall fast asleep. To this day it is still my all time favorite Model T.

"The Car That Started it All:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 02:13 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 02:14 pm:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 02:16 pm:








Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Scott Owens on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 02:19 pm:

Hey Matt, Dont let Royce see the water pump. He will want you to send your car to the crusher for spurlious parts. Ok Royce just a little kidding. You are still loved. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 02:29 pm:

Yeah he added that a few years ago when He got the engine back brand new completely rebuilt five years ago. It was so tightly done that he had to install the electric starter to start it, and it kept over heating. To solve the over heating he opted for the water pump to help out: and it did. Five years and that brand new engine has under 100 miles on it tops. Runs like a swiss watch (well maybe not THAT finely tuned, it is a T after all :-) )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 02:49 pm:

That car has a high radiator and hood which makes it a 1924, not a 1923.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 03:15 pm:

Interesting topic to be sure.
I inherited the 24 Coupe that I have from my Grandfather in 1958 when I was 10 years old.
Its been in our family since 1942 when my Grandfather bought it. He was the 2nd owner.

I finally got around to restoring it about 3 years ago.

Its been in the same family for 71 years.

Anyone else had a T in the same family any longer?
There probably is but it would be interesting to know who has one since it was new!
And yes this is the Model T that sparked my interest in Model T's!

model T 24


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Baker on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 03:29 pm:

My 22 touring cut off has been in the family since new. My grandfather put it up on blocks in 42. I inherited it in 01 at his funeral. I went through it in 2010 and it started for the first time in 69 years! My daughter that just turned 2 is the 5th generation of my family that has enjoyed this T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Baker on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 03:32 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Baker on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 03:34 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 04:16 pm:

James, nice job!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Baker on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 04:29 pm:

Thanks Ed. This is a pic of the day it started for the first time after 69 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 04:31 pm:

Erik: It originally had a low radiator until about two years ago. With the overheating problems he decided to try swapping out the radiator (and thus hood) too. He just hasn't bothered to switch it back yet. Pointers for noticing it though :-) He would raise Hell if someone pointed out to him that it isn't currently correct. The T was found in a barn in 1962. Finished in 1970 minus the top. Top was done in 1972.

The T when found was all there: but not fully together. A farmer had long ago converted it to a tractor: trunk was off, top long since rotted, roadster body still on, it had some sort of plow hook up on the rear of it. Other assorted parts like hood, lights, etc were throughout the barn. It even came with a spare engine. He ran that spare for decades, until 5 years ago when he sent off to have the original off the factory engine for that car to be rebuilt. Year is April of 1923.
People ask him: "how go you keep your roadtser top uncreased, cracked, like new?"
His response is: "I put that top up in 1972, it's only been down twice since then. I figure keep it up and it will never crease."
I'd love to inherit the T, or have it go to my uncle donny who helped him with it when he was a boy. Unfortunately my Aunt who is in charge of his finaces says when he dies it's being sold to pay for funeral expenses, paying off house costs until the house sells, and the remainder being split between his kids. I understand where she's coming from, but I hate to see the car that got me into the hobby for years go to a stranger who doesn't know its background. 51 years it's been in the family now. I'd like it to be in the damily for another 51. Solution? I'll just have to start saving so I can save the T: I told him he can't kick it for at least another decade then (I hate to see him go even more).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 04:31 pm:

When I was about 8 years old I remember playing
with brass era match box cars. Eventually the model T came into my life. While in college I joined the major clubs. Got my first T after I paid off my student loan when I was about 33 y/o.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 04:35 pm:

James: Indeed nice job! Is that an old Volkswagen Bug next to it too? I like it! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill dugger on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 04:43 pm:

Well guys' I got my first "T" about 26 year ago and now have two. My fist one is '19 Touring and the second is a '17 Depot Hack I am now thinking of a Speedster. I have the engine and misc parts. It will just take me time and $$$$$ to get it started. There is a Ruckstell in the garage waiting to be rebuilt. Have parts on order, and will put that under the Depot Hack and that Rear end may go under the next project,
Oh well my money is not making any thing in the bank, as one just renewed for .02500000 percent. It is an IRA account and I should have closed it and moved it but my would not see to it now she regrets it.
Everyone Enjoy the ride of the Day

Bill D MTFCA #14079


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Baker on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 04:43 pm:

Thanks Matthew, That's my 72 Superbeetle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel(Indiana Trucks)Star City In on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 05:15 pm:

The one that stuck in my mind was this 1917 because it was the first model T I had ever seen outside of a picture. It drove up and parked at Riverside Park in Logansport Indiana sometime in the late 70's or early 80's.


The next one was this 1919 TT that was in a 3 day estate auction where I went with my Dad and we thought if this thing sells for $500 I would own it. The truck was a one owner and the owner was in his 90's and never threw anything away. It had compression and looking back, would have ran with a little gas. He had parked it on stands in the barn and who knows how long it had sat. The bidding started and went fast and when all was done it brought $4600. This was March 20, 1982 and you could buy a restored T for $3000 back then so I didn't get this one and never saw it or the 1917 Roadster again. Anyone here know any more about either one of them?


Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 05:27 pm:

3 years ago I was at the Pantowners car show and swap meet in St Cloud MN. A fella there had an old Model T touring in the "car corral". As I recall He wanted around $6000.00 for it. It was a well used car and had some rust issues and a few things might have been needed to be done with the interior. While I was looking it over he said he'd drop the price to $5500.00. I got my best "frustration look" on my face and offered him $5000.00. I looked over at my wife and she had a look of anticipation on her face and after 30 years I recognized that as her "keep working on it" look. But the guy said no he wouldn't go below the $5500.00. About then she said let's go for a walk and talk about it. So we went out into the swap meet and walked around for a while and soon I asked her what she thought and her response was "about what". It was at that minute my heart sunk. But after putting on that look we've all got that says we're capable of squishing a grape with one hand and telling her I was going back for a second look, she relented and we walked back into the car corral to an empty parking spot where the T had been sitting. And I hadn't bothered to get the guys name or phone number. So I pushed the old car to the back of my mind but every now and then I'd think about it and knew someday if I ever had the chance I'd own a Model T. On Easter Sunday 2011 I walked into the house and my wife was sitting in her favorite rocking chair. She had a sort of pained expression and when I asked her what was wrong she said she wanted to end the marriage. Though my heart sank I knew it was over and I'd have to start my life again. After 33 years of what I thought was a good marriage, it came to an abrupt halt. She just couldn't see putting all the money into the farm and being bothered with me wanting other things in my life. So I moved out and within a month we were divorced. I received about 1/3 of the total value of our property. I had my tools and clothes and my old F150 truck. And enough money to make a down payment on a mobile home and purchase a Model T and my furniture. It was that original Model T at the swap meet that drew me in but it was the touring I own now that ended up meaning the most. After a couple years my ex-wife are still close friends. She has her farm and an excellent income. She also kept the '38 Ford we had restored and she seems happy. Neither of us have moved on as far as finding anyone else we prefer to be with and seem to enjoy a cup of coffee from time to time and spending holidays with out kids.

My touring:


Her '38:


My current stable:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 07:42 pm:

I first loved Model Ts on TV. As a kid back in the late 50s & early 60s I watched a lot of TV which at that time showed a lot of old movies including those of Laurel & Hardy. I quickly noticed that the these old cars were a lot more fun than the new ones I saw every day. I have wanted on ever since.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 07:52 pm:

My uncle Red a had model A 2 door & I would spend hours setting in that car & checking out every detail. When not visiting the car, I'd be pouring over the latest JC Whitney catalog from which you could order almost an entire model A (or so it seemed to me at the time).

Then one day while in hi school, I found out a buddy's dad had a '27 touring car & one day I got to ride in it. Watching him negotiate the pedals (and the shimmy in the front end) mesmorized me. I made my mind up that I had to have one, especially since it was also my dad's first car. It took a few years to fulfill the dream, but I was able to show my '26 touring off to both uncle Red and my dad before they passed away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 08:09 pm:

1923 Model T Runabout. It is my wife's car she purchased and a friend of ours drove it home for us. It made it half way and then run out of gas. Put a gallon of gas in it and it failed to start.

Trailered it home (another 14 miles). A couple of days later a local Model T Guru came over and had it running in 15 minutes. I've been hooked ever since.

We now have the 1923, a 1926 Tudor and 1927 Touring. I am building a 1915 Roadster pickup and I think that will round out our collection!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 08:13 pm:

That's a great story Mike.

Paul, I remember those old laurel and Hardy movies. If they went between two trucks it came out smashed flat, if they got run into by a bus it would turn into an accordian and a lot of other things. Once in a while I still go on Youtube and look up the Keystone Cops or Laurel and Hardy or Harold Lloyd and several others. How many days were spent back in those days laughing at these clowns? Some of the best memories of my childhood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 08:18 pm:

Here's the car that did it for me... doing it again, for 9 more of the next generation.



My great-grandparents bought this car new in Sept. 1914. In 1927, it was retired to the corn crib when Great Grandpa bought a new 1927 Fordor. In 1940, both of my great-grandparents were killed in a car accident, driving their brand new '40 Ford. The '14 was used a couple more times in parades, and was then sold by the estate in the late 40s to a local guy who parked it in a garage, and never drove it. My parents bought it from him in 1990 when I was 7 years old, and my Dad restored it.

It can be seen several times in this 1942 parade footage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDbkehrJkHM


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 08:34 pm:

Let me think about this for a minute Derek. 9 kids and a priest in the film. I know it's none of my business but I have to ask. Are you Mormon? :-)

A great film. I got a little disappointed to see how they were treating that poor Donkey. But it was all for the show.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 08:37 pm:

If it was not for this 1924 TT truck, I might be in the old tractor hobby. I have a number of them.
The 24 TT was bought by my dad and his brother to replace the wagon and mules. They were in the cotton gin business. In the early 1940's, the gin was shut down and my uncle used the truck to haul corn on his farm.
By the late 1950's my uncle retired and the family truck was left parked. I took it to my dad's place across the road and started driving it. The rest is history and the car/truck collection was started with no end in sight with my two sons adding to it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 08:42 pm:

Oh I forgot, the TT was bought new in 1924 and they set on the fuel tank to drive it home. No cab or seats, just hood fenders and fire wall.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 09:01 pm:

There's no picture of the one that did it for me. I was in high school when I saw a green '27 coupe sitting on a street corner with a FOR SALE sign on it. I tried to talk my folks into it, but they wouldn't go for it. $700 was a lot of dough in those days. About twenty years ago I bought a '26 roadster pickup project, then in 2007 came the '24 TT project. It wasn't until 2008 that I finally bought an actual running Model T, a '23 touring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 09:10 pm:

Nah, Mike... German Catholic farmers :-) We'd make a Mormon family look small. Mom's one of 12 kids in her family, and Dad's one of 15 in his. I have over 80 first cousins.

Only 2 of the 9 in that picture are mine, the others are my nieces & nephews. My dad is driving, and my Mom is in the back holding an infant that can't be seen very well. There's 11 people in the car in that picture.

There are actually 2 parades spliced together in that film, and the '14 appears decorated differently in each. One is definitely 1942 or later, and the other we're not sure. If it's 1940 or earlier, that may be my great-grandparents (the original owners) driving when it is shown with the red/white/blue on the top-bows.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 09:54 pm:

I figured you were Catholic. My wife was from a large German Catholic family in Southern MN too. Her family populated the area North of Worthington. As your's must have populated the area between Rochester and Owatonna. Is the Mantor House still open? And what about that little ice cream place across the street. They always had the best hard serve ice cream. I almost bought a house in Mantorville. I had a bid in on it and was ready to go to the bank when I found my place over by New Richland.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way, Wa. on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 11:27 pm:

It all started while sitting on a jury ( murder trial) in 1979 in Anchorage Ak. and finding out one fellow juror had the carcass of a 1916 Model T that he wanted to get rid of, It had traveled up the Alcan Hwy. in the 50's as ballast on a load of something. It also came with a pair of skies for the front. I've been hooked on Model T's and the history of the Automobile Snow Attachments ever sense.
As found in 1979

As it is today 2013


Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 11:33 pm:

This is the one that got me started. My Dad used to always talk about driving these funny cars with the three pedals, so long before I got this one I was fascinated by them.

Regards, John

My Australian Bodied Ute., 1965


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Matthiesen on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 11:37 pm:

This is the T that hooked me. Picture was taken in 1937 as my Grandparents returned from a month long camping trip (with Granny's sister and husband) through the Black Hills of South Dakota. My grandfather drove the car daily until his death in 1953. I have been the 09's caretaker for the family since 1975. In 2008 we proudly drove it in my hometown's 125th anniversary parade.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 04:53 am:

My first exposure to a Model T was my next door neighbor in 79' Ed Tate, he had a 1921 Touring. He took me for a ride around the old Chatsworth Reservoir and then asked me if I wanted to drive it back. Well, I jumped at the chance, and have been hooked ever since. A couple of weeks later (which coincidentally my parents left for vacation) the San Fernando Valley Model T Club was holding a weekend long swapmeet at Fallbrooke Mall's rear parking lot. Ed asked me if I wanted to go, said I might see some cars there. I took about $100.00 out of the bank and went to the meet with Ed. I didn't at that time realize what these cars cost, but I was hoping I could at least buy something. By the end of the day I bought a frame, a brake control lever and a steering column for $75.00. That's where I started...I built mine from the ground up, it's pure 22 (with the exception of a 1914 low head and that 24 engine I got from Don Bell for $200.00) My father and I spent every weekend at every swapmeet we could find getting parts and what parts I didn't or couldn't get or find from the meets, the members either donated (in exchange for sandblasting) or sold me out right. I was going to be finished in a year, but I did something stupid and it didn't quite work out that way (I got married) my project got put on permanent hold.


Two marriages and a bunch of years later I started again in 2011. This time I'm going to finish the old girl, then I'm going to point her the general direction of East and see how far I can get. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill in Adelaida Calif on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 09:59 am:

The car that got me started wanting a T was a 1914 Touring parked in my uncle's dirt floored garage. He bought it from the estate of the second owner in the early 50's and restored it. As kid I was always looking for an excuse to go into that garage and look at the car. It came out of the garage once a year and was driven through a local parade and then parked again.
As time went on it was driven with less frequency until he had a flat tire in the early 90's and it was parked for the last time by my uncle. After he passed on 06 I bought it from my aunt and bought some tires for it :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth Swan on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 10:43 am:

Martin, have faith in your T, it will make it to where ever you want to go. I drove a T from Tennessee to Texas, then to California and to Alaska. In fact I have driven through 28 states, 3 Canadian provinces and from the Gulf of Mexico in Florida to the Arctic Circle. If you come through Tennessee, give me a shout. Remember you can go anywhere in one if you have a cell phone,AAA, and a MasterCard! Good Luck!!! Ken Swan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 11:37 am:

Very first? Probably L & H movies. Dad loved 'em. Actual T contact was with relatives that lived on Long Island. An Uncle had bought a 1919 Touring that was on blocks when I was a kid and when ever we visited I would promptly disappear into the barn. Usually they had to come looking for me. It's fully restored and my cousin still owns it. I drove it about 10 years ago but had my own T at the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 11:57 am:

Back when I was a little kid (Why do all my stories begin with that phrase?), my Dad took the family to Henry Austin Clark's "Long Island Automotive Museum." There, I saw this Fire Chief's car for the first time and decided I wanted to own a Model T Ford, some day.

Two links:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/104783.html

and...

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/136570.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 12:14 pm:

I remember riding in my grandfathers 1911 T around 8 years old on HCCA meets in Nebraska. It's possible that going with him and watching him work on his cars might have got me started with cars and mechanical things. My uncle (his son) was also a avid enduro racer in the 70's and I know for sure that rubbed off on me and my brother.

Don't know when he bought the 1911 but the 1916 Coupelet I inherited was purchased by him in December 1953 from the second owner. It's been in the family for sixty years.

Philip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 01:37 pm:

I played in and on both of these when I was 5 or 6 years old. My Great Grandfather's farm truck and my Grandfather's Tudor. Both of them have survived and I have the Tudor.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike conrad on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 05:54 pm:

I remember the first time I saw a model T. My family has always had antique cars but my grandfather told my dad there's two cars I won't have on his property one was the six cly. Essex the other was a model T. I will agree he was spot on with the Essex. Anyway dad never ended up with a T but growing up around the horseless carrige club I got my fair share of rides in them. somehow they were my favorite. My first memory of the T came from a family friend and their T His name was Jim Reed this man was such a T guy he took his kids out of school and drove his 1917 touring from Washington state to the Dearborn Mich and back in the 80's (does anyone remember?)As much fun this family had I made a promise to own a T. Fast forward 25 years while I have had more than a few, Dad just got his first T a week ago I am so Proud of Him.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 06:19 pm:



James Baker like me! T & VW.
I bought my '26 Touring when a senior in high school. It was a tradition for seniors in high school in Norway to drive around in old cars. In my class there was another T-Touring - a '27, as well as a '23 FIAT touring, a 4 cyl. Chevy and a '28 Dodge sedans.
I first looked at an 8 cyl. Hudson convertible sedan, which could have become a grand vehicle, but it was beyond my ability, time and money to make drivable, so when I saw the T, I was hooked. The owner just got in and hit the starter, and she came to life.
The '74 Superbeetle with "Autostick" was my dad's fifth and last Beetle. He bought the first one in 1953, and got a new one every five years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 06:58 pm:

My grandpa gave me a Model T repair manual by Victor Page, when I was 10 yrs. old and I wanted one until I bought a Model T when I was 16 yrs. old. A '26 Coupe. Paid $260.00. I have been hooked for 55 yrs. Now retired, I have 3. I still love them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 10:58 pm:

The 1909 T survivor that belonged to the owner of the local Ford dealership here in town was the one that got me.
His Dad kept it in the basement of the dealership until his son dragged it out and put it on display in the show room.
It was there till about 40 years ago when he got an offer he couldn't refuse.
As I recall the offer was an unheard of $6,000 and a Mr. Knight, of Knight Manufacturing, Brodhead, Wisconsin, bought it and restored it.
I'm still working on getting a photo of that car.......the dealer's wife is 88-89 years old and there's still a chance....... ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 11:56 pm:

My 23 comes from Hamburg, Wisconsin. That's between Wausau, Merrill and Athens. Draw that triangle and Hamburg is in the center. That was in 1945'ish. I brought it here, to Sacramento, in 1971 and restored it. I'm the second owner. A gent, now deceased, named Hank Czech was the first owner. Basically, Hank wanted to make a hay wagon our of it. I found a frame and 4 wheels and we traded. I was extremely rough on it as a kid but it hung in there and the parts that were on it then are the ones I'm driving today...including the cracked block, cracked by using water in zero degree winters.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, January 17, 2013 - 01:52 am:

Some of you know my T story - The T that sparked my interest showed up at our house in the mid 50’s when my dad purchased it and I helped him restore it. I had a slight interest in it during the early 60’s but focused on other things. Then 3 years ago, I was talking with my mom about “the old days” and she told me that she was waiting for me to “get that damn car out her barn” because it was in her way. The spark from the 50’s ignited the flame and I took mom for her first ride in the T since 1964 on Thanksgiving and now the flame is burning brightly.

Driving the T while in highschool -early 60's




Thanksgiving with Mom,





Family fun --


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - Evans Mills NY on Thursday, January 17, 2013 - 05:01 pm:

I got the model T bug at a hit and miss engine show around 15 years ago. There was a guy there with a touring car that gave me a ride around the grounds. It took me a couple of years to save up to get my first but I bet I'v drove that TT truck 2000 miles sense, from parades to just rides, Last year at the farm show in Washington crossing park nj I bet I had 20 boy scouts in the back. Now I have three model T's that my kids enjoy driving. Sometimes I think its more fun watching them drive my cars than me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, January 18, 2013 - 09:31 am:

Lots of great pics and stories! This is going to sound silly, but here it is:


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