Need a little techincal help

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Need a little techincal help
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Hycner on Sunday, January 20, 2013 - 07:34 pm:

Now that the car is running it's time to move onto the other things that need attention and the other problems that have showed up.
*Does anybody have a picture they can post of the parts inside a horn button for a '26? I have the bracket on the steering column and a black plastic button but I'm not sure what else is supposed to be there.
*My fuel tank looks like new on the inside with the tin coating still there. When I put in a few gallons today to fire up the engine it started to leak on the bottom where outlet is attached. Can this be soldered? Any suggestions?
*How long should I go before my first oil change after the rebuild?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, January 20, 2013 - 07:58 pm:

Jim

All that is in the horn button bracket is the disc with brass contact, that the two wires are held with screws in the terminals. A single bolt and nut secures the button and disc terminal by sandwich action in the bracket.

You can get new reproduction complete switch.


Shown are parts of reproduction and original.

As for the cowl gas tank, haul it to a good radiator shop, most will clean and repair a gas tank for you. Would be an easy fix.

Mine needed some of my own repair, the shop cleaned it, and then tested, and when almost full there was a weeping of fluid from that bracket, but mine was due to a pin hole or pin holes in the internal drain tube that runs thru the tank.

So I got gas tank sealer, and with cork plug at the end, poured in the sealer to fill that drain tube, poured out, repeated several times until the tube bore was sealed along its surface...has worked for years just fine now.

Change the break-in oil at 200 miles :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Sunday, January 20, 2013 - 07:58 pm:

I also have the same issue with the tank in my '26 touring. It weeps from the joint where the fitting is riveted to the tank. It doesn't really drip, but it stays wet from fuel. I've been draining the gas every time I store it which is a pain. I'm also interested the best way to fix it. I don't really want to use a sealer on the inside (the inside is very clean with no rust) because I never know if I can trust the stuff (if it peels off then it's a real mess).
thanks,
Mike Sa


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Hycner on Sunday, January 20, 2013 - 08:18 pm:

Dan, is there any kind of spring in there? What keeps the contacts from touching all the time?
Do I need to take the dash out to remove the gas tank or is there enough room to drop it down? I have a radiator shop that is local, this should be a easy fix. Thanks....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, January 20, 2013 - 08:38 pm:

Jim

No spring. The contact is normally open. The button is pushed, the contact closes. The disc that holds the contact is held fast by the machine bolt thru the bracket, the button 'floats' in the end of the bracket.

On your sedan, the tank should come out a bit more easy than open cars, the open car dash is tight for removing the tank. Follow the instructions in the Ford Service to drop and remove the cowl tank.

Steps include to disconnect the battery, and remove the ignition switch, pull the loom away to keep it from wedging. Found for me the tank comes out rather difficult, that lower outlet bracket is the last thing out, and must be the first thing in, install seems to go better :-)

On open cars I have had to loosen the dash screws, and pry up the dash a about an inch when pulling down on the tank. Also, loosening the pedals, and letting them drop down is helpful.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Sunday, January 20, 2013 - 10:04 pm:

If the tank weeps from where the fitting is rivited to the tank...remove, turn upside down, clean joint with a wire brush, clean joint with acetone and apply JB weld to joint.

If the weeping is from the threaded fitting, use the yellow teflon tape. (check for cracks in the threaded portion of the fitting - if its cracked, the teflon tape probably will not work)

Good luck
schuh


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Borland. Bathurst. NSW. Australia. on Sunday, January 20, 2013 - 10:40 pm:

G'day,
I refitted my tank fittings with good old copper irons and rosin core solder. I use three irons, two large ones to heat the work area, and a smaller easier to use one to work the solder. When the metal is heated and cleaned, a smooth finish is achievable and will last another eighty odd years. I use a gas torch that ignites with a press of a button away from the tank. Quick, easy and best of all permanent.

Peter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, January 20, 2013 - 11:42 pm:

A good coating of JB Weld should fix it and if done carefully it would not be noticeable when the tank is painted. If the inside of my tank looked good as described above by Jim, I would not let a radiator shop touch it. I think the tin coat would be damaged and you would need to apply a sealer to what was otherwise a good tank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Monday, January 21, 2013 - 02:32 am:

Jim, it is good practise to run the car until the engine is warm, and drain it straight away. That way any loose 'stuff' which may have gotten in during the rebuild will be flushed. I keep this drained oil to use in oilcans on all sorts of machinery.

hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken McGirr on Monday, January 21, 2013 - 07:59 am:

Jim,

If you remove the tank you may want to take a good look at the lacing the hood rests on over the cowl. We just removed/replaced a tank on a '26 coupe to access the split rivets that hold the lacing.

Ken


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill in Adelaida Calif on Monday, January 21, 2013 - 10:00 am:

I have found JB weld not to last forever.It will start seeping again in a few years. I have a non T gas tank that I have to re-seal every few years.

BIll


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Monday, January 21, 2013 - 11:48 am:

I've also found that JB weld and gasoline are not a permanent marriage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Monday, January 21, 2013 - 08:06 pm:

JB weld will not adhere permanently to anything that has, or has had gas or oil on it. I have had no problems since I started using acetone to clean parts prior to applying the JB weld. Can't do it with gas in the tank either. Hence the "upside down" and empty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Monday, January 21, 2013 - 08:38 pm:

Ted, that's why I haven't pulled my tank yet, I'm afraid the "cure" of a radiator shop will be worse than the disease of weeping. The inside of my tank is really nice (what You can see with a flashlight, anyway). I may pull it & see if my old antique soldering irons will get it hot enough to solder.
Mike Sa


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