What could you buy instead of a Model T with the same money in 1909?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: What could you buy instead of a Model T with the same money in 1909?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 12:36 am:

I did this with the Model K last month, and now the same for the Model T. Following are a list of automobiles available in 1909 for about the same money as a T. Pretty good evidence why the Model T was a "runaway" best seller.
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If anyone would like to compare another specific 1909 car and/or model let me know.

Enjoy,

Rob
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 12:54 am:

Well, if you were in Canada in 1909, you could still buy a Model S or a S Roadster or even a Model C and the trusty T as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 12:56 am:

Thanks Rob. I couldn't help but notice the weight of the Model T Touring near the top of the post listed as 1200 pounds. Didn't someone post here not too long ago that a couple was about 1700+? I would have thought the touring to be heavier still.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 01:39 am:

Danial, models with roof was heavier way up into the 30's, I think. Later on convertibles usually got heavier frames and other reinforcements & thus got heavier than sedans. The 1700+ lbs coupe was a 1922/23 model, by that time all T's had put on considerably weight - a touring with starter and demountables should weigh 1627 lbs by 1922. Think of all the stuff like windshield, front doors, cast iron hogshead etc that wasn't on the first 09's.
(see: http://www.mtfca.com/books/ford.htm#wts for weights 1915-23 )

On topic: The Cameron 20-24 hp chassis looks like a serious competitor, but reliability for the Cameron is unknown for me and their means to distribute and advertise nationally was probably limited. Ford grounded the success with the T by racing victories to make his name known and by several preceding good cars that built a reputation - so Cameron didn't really have a chance even if it was a reliable and even more up to date car than the T(?) Location New York while perhaps positive for marketing didn't really help when most of those who were gifted for and interested in this new industry gathered in Detroit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 02:31 am:

Thanks Roger. I guess I just assumed that with the longer body and extra metal the touring would have more than made up for the little bit of extra metal in the four posts that hold up the leather roof of a coupe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 05:42 am:

Also the starter, demountable wheels, cast iron rather than aluminum hogs head, six inch rather than 5 1/2 inch wheel flanges, thicker spokes, front doors on touring and roadsters, windshields, etc. all added weight to the later cars.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 07:02 am:

The 1909 touring weight does not include a top, headlights or carbide generator. Also, the wooden bodies are considerably lighter than later Model T's that had steel skinned touring bodies.

When Rob compared the Model K to its competition the other cars are essentially similar, with the Model K being typical and in so many ways no better (or worse) than the cars in its market segment. Thus the Model K sold in numbers comparable to many of its competitors.

It is hard to compare the Model T with any other car on the market in 1909. There was no other car that offered the same power and dependability, even at double the price. Like the Model N/R/S, it was head and shoulders above any of its competition in terms of value and quality for the price.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 07:12 am:

Royce,

Do my threads now all generate a comment from you?

My comparison with the Model K showed that the nearest competitor cost significantly more than the K. The K was lighter, higher horsepower and longer wheelbase than e it's competitors costing the same money.

I'm sick and tired of you paraphrasing my comments to fit your intent. Kindly generate your own threads, instead of using mine to present your opinions.

I don't "stalk" your threads (or do you begin threads, or just snipe others, guess I don't know) , I'd appreciate the same courtesy.

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 08:18 am:

what I did say, first in comparison to the other six cylinders on the market at the time:

Link:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/331602.html?1356925901
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And in comparison to the $3000 cars in the survey where the Model K finishes 5th among US autos costing $3000 or less:

the link: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/331550.html?1356898419

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 08:21 am:

When I started this thread last evening I actually thought "well, nothing Royce can disagree with or contest on this, a clear view of how the Model T compared with comparably priced competitors".

Shows how much I know :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 08:25 am:

Clearly, the Model T had no competitors. It was a stunning, incomprehensible leap ahead of all similarly priced cars of the day. It was clear evidence of what Henry Ford could do once he shed the misdirections of his old bosses John Gray and Alexander Malcomson.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 08:49 am:

Henry must have "bore a terrible cross" under the "yoke" of John Gray and Alexander Malcomson (dripping of sarcasm).

Wait a minute, Ford Motor Company had become the largest auto manufacturer in the U.S. in only three years of production with this "team". Maybe it wasn't so intolerable for Ford after all.


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