OT - Last Model K thread. Bits and Pieces from owners, dealers and others:

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: OT - Last Model K thread. Bits and Pieces from owners, dealers and others:
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 01:27 pm:

I originally set out to post articles and ads from 1906-1908 regarding the Ford Model K. The series of threads has "morphed" quite a bit, but this is the final portion of accounts I've collected.

I hope those of you who read along enjoyed all or portions of the threads.

Rob

I'll start with this. It is a photo of K number 2. Bob Trevan sent me the photo, and maybe he will share more of the details of the car if he reads this post. K number 2 now resides with Bob "down under". Thank you for the photo, Bob.
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This is the earliest ad for Model K that I've encountered, November 29, 1905:
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In this August 1907 account, Gaston Plantiff, Ford manager for New York mentions how well sales of Ford cars are going. The interesting part is sales equal about 10 to 1 Ns to Model K. that seems to fit into Ford projections when they stated they wished to sell 10,000 Ns and 1,000 Ks.
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Next, the Model K Roadster chosen as Pacecar for the Ocean to Ocean tour. This Model K carried the Race Official from New York to St. Louis, leading the competitors. I think the Acme (one of the contestants) is beside the K.
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This newspaper clip talks about the arrival of a new 1907 K in California. It says the car looks like a Locomotive, and how the dealer can't wait to race it against a Pope Hartford and Oldsmobile.
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 02:00 pm:

This news account, while hard to read, says "The arrival at the New York headquarters....of the latest Ford creation .... " The spot talks about the roadster being capable of 70 miles per hour. Gaston Plantiff says four orders for the new model were booked the first day it arrived.

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General news clip about the number of six cylinders increasing dramatically to thirty four car makers. October, 1907:
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July 28th 1907 Ford Advertising. In part it claims 800 six cylinder Fords sold since 1906:
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 02:36 pm:

A fine recap. I am still reading and still enjoying your postings on the model K. Maybe in a couple years, all this can turn into a book?
Spring is on its way. Soon you can get back to driving and enjoying the car. How is the work on it coming along? Upholstery done yet?
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 02:49 pm:

I wish we had a "LIKE" button like they do on Facebook. I'd never paid much of any attention to the K even tho Towe had one when their shop was running about a mile away from me. After a few rides in Rob's K at Hilton Head I became much impressed with the car and much more interested in it. I, for one, am glad this thread and the others about the K have been posted, even the naysayers who don't think much of it. It's all part of the history. Thanks, Rob.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 02:51 pm:

Next, personal new accounts of Ford sixes:
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Mention of a "six cylinder Ford" stopping in Tempe on the way to Los Angeles, February 1910.
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November, 1908. Three parties driving to San Benito in "Mr. Haywood's new six cylinder Ford machine, one of the finest in the valley". They go on to say the car is "on the racer order" and cost several thousand dollars.
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December, 1910. Three years into the Model T run, a Milwaukee Ford dealer is still demonstrating the hill climbing ability of a Ford six cylinder car. The Ford took the hill in high gear, while the competitor couldn't make it in high (in thirty seconds), then took the hill in high gear again, this time at a slow speed, taking two minutes and forty five seconds (showing the low end pulling ability of the K).
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June 1906 news bit says Ford six cylinder cars are showing good results in New York, Boston and Chicago. Also, the Franklin six is showing well too. These are two of the earliest six cylinder cars on the US market.
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Jan 1st, 1909. At midnight, seventeen cars run the the second 100 mile New Years tour. A Ford 60-40 (Model K) is the pathfinder for the group.
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July, 1906, Trenton NJ man buys a six cylinder Ford machine.
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The Mayor of Cleveland, OH buys a Ford six cylinder car, to use on trips and for railroad inspections.
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July 6, 1906. Special garage built for a Model K in Tacoma WA. This must be one of the earliest Model Ks delivered.
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 03:14 pm:

For those suggesting the Model K wasn't a good "seller", a few conflicting news tidbits:

First, the magazine "Automobile Topics writes in July 1906 that Ford Motor Co has doubled their work force and added a night shift to reach a ten per day. It also says daily output is now eight "of these big cars".


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Next, in the same Automobile Topics issue:

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Gaston Plantiff again, (NY sales manager) announcing the sale of six 6-cylinder cars.
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I'll finish these later this evening. Stan and Wayne, thank you for your comments. Stan, I'm in the process of putting that beautiful Buffalo carb on the K now.

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 03:20 pm:

I forgot to caption the photo and story above about a manager's meeting. I thought it interesting that Ford Motor Company put "three six cylinder cars and one four cylinder car at their disposal". Also, the menu included a "toothsome dish" of "frog dinner", and "sparkling champagne with sparkling wit". (if it's like me, the more wine, the more wit :-().


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Cook on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 04:06 pm:

Have enjoyed all of your posts on the Model K Rob. Having had the good fortune to look at Bob's 1906 Model K up close (I live nearby) it is one imposing vehicle! Your study has been very informative. What a shame more of these cars didn't survive. Chris.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Trevan - Australia on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 04:31 pm:

Hi Rob,
Thanks for the invite to tell the story of the resurrection of
''K''#2. I'm sure when shown it will interest many as it was a masses restoration exercise that be it any other car i would not have taken on the job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 06:09 pm:

This is not picking a nit. But I think the first post, where it says they have now reached "The ten day point in the delivery of six cylinder cars," probably would be interpreted to mean that they are now only ten days behind on orders. That would tell me that they are selling pretty well.

Rob, I hope that Buffalo runs OK. That thing was bugger to get running and adjusted on my test engine, which is quite a little smaller than the K. I use a Ford 600 tractor for a test engine. It's only 134 cubic inch. Let me know how the Buffalo runs, it ran pretty well on the test engine after I finally got the adjustments figured out. No books on Buffalo carbs that I could find.

(By the way, I'm working on Bill Evenden's 5 ball today and yesterday. Every piece on it was worn or wrong. Had the float mechanism all built and installed and was tightening up the fuel line adapter and the whole inlet snapped off. It looks like it had been cracked and the tightening up of the line on it snapped it off. Start over on it now. Better to have that happen in the shop than on the car.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 06:34 pm:

Stan, I'll keep u posted. Thanks for the rebuild,

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 08:50 pm:

A few more:

A Ford agent in CA talking about driving their Ford touring demonstrator through the San Joaquin valley. " The car has run 1400 miles to date without the slightest adjustment".....
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Ford agent talks about a planned trip in a Ford six touring car through Pennsylvania and crossing New York and touching Massachusetts. In the next paragraph he mentions the new Model T.
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Gaston Plaintiff, Ford New York sales manager, talks about the program to "recondition" 1906 Model Ks at Ford, then resell them with a two year "warranty".
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lots of Ford info on this one. In addition to the Ford agent planning a trip with his Ford six, there are references to other Ford owners and buyers, and a reference to the "surprise" Ford will have with the 1909 model.
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I find it interesting that during the summer 1908 through 1910 period, there is a transition occurring during which all models of Fords "coexist". Model Ks continue to compete, and be demonstrated after the Model T has appeared on the market (as we would expect).

I still think the best example of this "coexistence" is the selection of the Model K roadster as the pacecar for the Ocean to Ocean tour, in which the two Model T racers are featured.

If I get back to this tonight, I'll finish with period pics of Model Ks.

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 09:42 pm:

Rob

What number is your car and what number is Bob's?

I think we need some side by side shots of the 2 cars so we can compare them. You will have to go down under or Bob can come up here.

Would be nice if the two of you could come up witha batch of front, side and rear shots.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 10:28 pm:

Dave, Bob's car is #2. Incredible. Also, I was just speaking with another K friend "down under", Francis Ransley. He has number 31.

These are two of the few remaining 1906 versions. They have a 6 inch shorter wheelbase, along with other differences. Both cars have toured extensively. Maybe Bob will give us a little more information about them.

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 10:55 pm:

Oh, I forgot, our car is number 688. The latest produced K still existing (that I've heard of) is number 953, although I'm not aware who owns it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 12:03 am:

Last round. Some of my favorite period photos:

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And of course, my favorite:
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Just like a fireworks display, you finish with your best :-)

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 01:08 am:

Nice!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 01:17 am:

A couple of years ago at the Long Beach Swap, there was a guy peddling 1912 Mercer Raceabout replicas based on Overland running gear. What would be the best start for a replica K?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 03:41 am:

Thanks for all of your careful research, Rob. You certainly have brought new light into the K history, and it has been very interesting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 05:19 am:

Thanks guys.

Ralph,

A Ford TT frame. Dean Yoder had the engine on an old TT frame while he worked on it (engine). It was surprising how similar in length, strength and width it was.

Then of course, any old 400 cubic inch motor :-)
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 07:54 am:

Rob,

It is a beautiful historic car and you should feel blessed to own such a wonderful collection of antique vehicles.

It appears from the side view that the top of the hood is a few inches lower than the knees of the driver & passenger. Is it a little unnerving driving the car at speed? Being so open like that. Is it tough to put the top up with the car being that tall? And is the engine gravity fed with the fuel tank beneath the driver's seat?

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 09:22 am:

Willis,

Driving an open front car, no doors or windshield, is exhilarating. In states with motorcycle helmet laws, it's like riding a bike without the helmet.

Yes, the top is high, about a half foot taller than an 09 T.

Ks are gravity fed. The touring is very similar to a Y in setup. The main difference between NRSK and T is the separate "grease flinging" transmission.

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 11:39 am:

Of the K's that still exist, are any of them runabouts. The body style looks completely different. Your K has curved fenders in front and straight fenders in the rear. The runabout is exactly the opposite. The touring also appears to have a much deeper area for your legs while the runabout is cut at a more rakish angle and the leg area is level with the side of the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 12:52 pm:

Former Towe museum, now www.CalAutoMuseum.org ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 07:19 pm:

Dave,

In addition to the one Ralph mentions, I know of three other roadsters. One is the late Larry Porter's, on loan to the AACA museum at Hershey, one in Ohio, and one at the museum in Alaska. I believe there may be another at the California museum, an unrestored original.

Initially Ford said they would only build fifty roadsters, and I believe estimates are that about 300 were built. They are really "racy" looking, but surprisingly listed as only 100 lbs lighter than the touring.

Rob
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, January 24, 2013 - 12:11 am:

Yeah, that is the one I want. An old speedster bum like me couldn't do much better than that.
Rob, I see that the picture you just posted shows the car with demountable wheels. I'm not looking for a major discussion about them. Although I do wonder how soon after the car was built the wheels may have been changed?
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Thursday, January 24, 2013 - 12:40 am:

Are they also 30 x 3 1/2?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Thursday, January 24, 2013 - 08:00 am:

Wayne and Dave,

I guessing the demountables are Firestone or some other aftermarket wheels.

The touring came with 34X4 tires, while the touring came with 36 in tires. I've been told the 36 in tires would "rub" on the fender brackets (or frame) before maxing out the turn. Unfortunately I don't know for sure. I would think a roadster would be an incredible car to drive.

Rob


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