Early Model T wreck / Great Northern RR

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Early Model T wreck / Great Northern RR
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Carter on Tuesday, February 09, 2010 - 05:48 pm:

front
rear


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bernd Lorenzen on Tuesday, February 09, 2010 - 06:08 pm:

Wow,
I hope the driver and passenger(s) jumped free...
In the second picture it looks as if the front wheel was still turning.

Bernd


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Houston on Tuesday, February 09, 2010 - 08:23 pm:

A romantic Ode...

They met at midnight..

But, they shall never meet again...

For She was a North bound Tin Lizzie.

Ane He was a West bound Train.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Houston on Tuesday, February 09, 2010 - 08:27 pm:

Is that the late 11/12 rear axle?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Carter on Tuesday, February 09, 2010 - 09:23 pm:

I think so, but can't tell for sure.
1a


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Rademacher on Tuesday, February 09, 2010 - 09:26 pm:

May take a little time to get that one fixed back up.. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 01:22 am:

David, that was my thought too! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 02:16 am:

Train:1, Ford:0


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By david willis on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 02:19 am:

isn't there a thread on front axle straightening???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 02:29 am:

Look again at the top pic: "Refrigerator"

Those could have been pretty rare, but went into service as early as 1851.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refrigerator_car

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 04:52 am:

And after 100 years, people still try it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 09:58 am:

Oh you guys, that's not a wreck. What you see here is a photo taken behind the Highland Park plant where Ford was experimenting with "on the fly" delivery methods. Henry Ford got the idea after seeing mail delivered from a moving train.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 10:45 am:

I thought they were delivering a "knocked down" car by rail, and were just beginning to assemble it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 11:07 am:

Good one Warren !

My A.F. layout has the mail bag stand and mail car and it's great fun to watch the bag get snatched from the post while the train is on the move and even more fun to try and find the mail bag after it gets tossed from the moving mail car !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 - 02:25 pm:

Warren:

I thought that it was another unloading mishap for a local production of "Ragtime."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 03:06 am:

Not a lot to work with but here is a little closer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Carter on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 05:24 am:

Perhaps this enlargement is clearer:
2a


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Carter on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 05:35 am:

I'm not sure where the photos were taken. The person that had them originally thought they were taken in Havre, MT, but the mountains seemed to indicate that it was somewhere else. Another photo in the set was apparently taken in Leavenworth/Cashmere, WA which is perhaps a better possibility? On one building I could read "Warehouse No 5." Any information would be appreciated.

1b


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 09:01 am:

Looks like two piece spindles.
I bet someone spun the wheel for the camera.Cameras were not that easy to set up back then. Unless it was a staged event that was for a safety event, but I don't think so.

herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Augustinovich on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 09:12 am:

I suppose this didn't get fixed either!
I still miss my '14 T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 09:19 am:

At the time this photo was taken, photograpy was no longer a difficult, time consuming process, reserve only for the professional photographer.

The Kodak Brownie Box Camera, was the Model T of photography. Introduced in 1900, it made taking high quality pictures easy for the common man. These photos were probably taken by a brownie. Jim Patrick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 11:48 am:

Oh I agree Jim. But I don't think that the spinning wheel was caught right away by a cell phone camera. Some one came along later and gave it a spin for the camera.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry A.woods on Friday, February 12, 2010 - 02:51 am:

A long time historian of my local town told me of just such a meeting between a T and a M K T "Katy Flyer". Seems this well known local family had come to town to do their weekly shopping and when approaching the tracks, observed the tail end of a westbound train pass the crossing. There was a string of empties setting on a siding that obscured a eastbound "Flyer". The driver made the mistake of proceding blindly onto the tracks. End result was the same for the T in the picture and five members (an entire family) gone from this Earth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john r. wightman on Friday, February 12, 2010 - 03:57 pm:

Well, I think I recognize the scene. The train cars are probably being loaded with apples. Cashmere was a huge apple producing are by 1913. I spent the summers as a kid in the Wenatchee Valley, and in particular my relatives had apple and pear orchards in the area of Cashmere, WA. I think the photograph was taken in Cashmere WA. as a child I can remember going past the small white buildings in the background, which by the 1960s were in a very dilapidated and abandoned condition (just perfect for a bunch of small kids to poke through). Train cars on that siding would be loaded with apples and pears. I believe the top photograph (with the large hill in the background) is looking down the main track toward Wenatchee Washington. I believe the other photograph (with a smaller hill) is looking up the mainline toward Dryden, Peshastin and Leavenworth WA. The photograph obviously wasn't taken at Leavenworth because the hills there are much different, even though the distance is only a short ways, because Leavenworth abuts the Cascades and mountains around Leavenworth are far more steep and jagged. I believe downtown Cashmere is just off to the left side of the top first picture, and that the Cashmere fruit growers cooperative was/is located on the other side of the tracks from the little white buildings. I'm in Arizona now, but next time I go to Cashmere I will take a look at this area to see if I can do a "then and now" photograph. I suspect the car was hit while it was parked there was hit by a train as itwent down the mainline. As we learned when we were kids, you don't want to go too close to the train, as those trains were loaded with a lot a lumberform the area swa mills (now long closed), and the boards would shake loose and the train went down the tracks, and the boards could stick out 20 or 30 feet as the train went by, and could take your head off. This was a great area for a young kid to explore, and pick up model T and model a parts for free. The Wenatchee River runs right through Cashmere, and the river banks always had a lot of junk cars littering them. Also the washes on the hills had all sorts of rusty thing in them. I found in junked 1913 T just down the road from Cashmere, it still had the sidelights on it, and one of the first cars I wanted, but did not get was a 1929 model a coupe for $25. Rollie.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Friday, February 12, 2010 - 04:14 pm:

It's odd when you consider what was damaged and what wasn't. Altho' you can't see the engine side of that brass radiator, viewing from the front side it looks perfect! Also, it would appear that leather might be stronger than iron and steel. Look at the leather strap "shock absorbers" both still intact and attached to the frame and the rear axel!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Carter on Saturday, February 13, 2010 - 02:50 pm:

Rollie - Thank you for posting the information on Cashmere. If you would like to have higher resolution copies of the photos please send me a PM.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A,J, Bell on Sunday, February 14, 2010 - 12:53 am:

Hi All

Many of Great Northern stations were build with the
same simple trackside design, and the ones at Cashmere
are still standing. These two photos may help to confirm
Rollie’s recollections of the area.



Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Carter on Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - 04:13 pm:

To those of you that aren't interested in the non-t part of the update, I apologize in advance....

I had a chance to drive through Cashmere and Leavenworth Washington about a week ago and took some pictures in Cashmere to show the possible location of the wrecked Model T in the original post. Although it looks like the buildings and tracks have changed somewhat, it does look like Cashmere is a good match for the original picture. Among the differences noted, it looks like the building showing above the top of the rail cars was extended toward the mountain some time later.

orig pic
2010 pic

Also, here is a current picture of the depot building that Art posted which is on the other side of the tracks from the buildings in the two pictures above.
depot now

Here is a Google Maps satellite view of the area (the depot is on the Mission Ave side of the tracks and the other buildings are on the Railroad Ave side):
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=109+railroad+ave,+cashmere,+wa&sll=47.520874,-120.468961&sspn=0.003753,0.009806&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=109+Railroad+Ave,+Cashmere,+Chelan,+Washington+98815&t=h&ll=47.520577,-120.468585&spn=0.003753,0.009806&z=17


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - 05:49 pm:

In my internet browser, and not sure if it works with any other, I can left click the picture and move it, superimposing it over the original picture. There is an offset jog on the mountain in the distance: it's the same place.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen on Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - 06:14 pm:

Great detective work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 02:42 am:

i would still like that car as a restoration project


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr. on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 10:56 am:

That car looks like Charles Atlas tried to crank 'er up and she flew off the handle. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard G Goelz on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 11:04 am:

I laugh every time i see this picture,it looks like they opened the door on the railcar and just threw the car and pieces out.
Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 11:57 am:

Twenty years ago, I bought a large "coffee table book" called America Then and Now. I've always had an interest in this type of thing. It is a book full of before and after photo's as you've done above. Thanks John.

More train-car accidents.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 12:15 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john r. wightman on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 06:14 pm:

Hey John Carter: Thanks for going there, great that you took the "then and now" pictures of the scene of the wreck. That's just how I remembered it looking 40 years ago. Now, if I could only remember where I put my glasses down.... Rollie.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 10:36 pm:

Not wanting to highjack but it is related.How would you all go about researching a train wreck as far a newspaper artical or something?
My grandpal was driveing a tractor trailer and was hit by a high speed steam passenger train.It went from DC to somewhere way south of here.Cant remember the name,Something Express or Limited.Had to be in the late 30's 40's maby.It happened in Gastonia.And yes,I have googled and dogpiled it to death and aint found anything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 10:49 pm:

I dont know about you guys, but Ill start the bidding at 2500 for that T wreck, it may be sitting in a barn someplace!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 11:33 pm:

Well fixing a car after it was hit by a train can be done.Several years ago a friend was looking over some cars that a fellow down the road had and a recent 1 they hauled in was a rusted out 34 ford that was bowed up in the middle and such and it was obvious it was wrecked years ago.He ask first what happened to it,they said it was hit by a train,he then ask what the ----- they was going to do with it.Well fix it.Duh.
Turns out a couple years ago the man turned down a huge price for the street rod he built with that crumpled up body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Saturday, July 17, 2010 - 12:09 am:

Those refrigerator cars were still being used in the early fifties. I recall finding rock salt along the tracks in a San Pedro rail yard where they had packed in the ice and salt.


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