"23" T corn shucker

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: "23" T corn shucker
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By alan mitchell on Saturday, March 13, 2010 - 08:50 pm:

Below you will find a link to a youtube video of my nephew Jim Mitchell's 1923 T roadster pickup running a belt drive hooked up to an antique corn shucker.He also runs a buck saw or fodder chopper off of this same drive. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4emWk2W17_o&feature=grec I don't know who shot the video but I do know where, a great show in south jersey called Harry Fleming's Pumpkin Run. This show takes place in an old junkyard full of nothing but antiques


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, March 13, 2010 - 08:59 pm:

That is very cool! Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Mitchell on Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 01:02 am:

Gotta love it!!!!!! I do, Thanks for posting that Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 10:38 am:

Corn chowder, hush puppies, ...... any recipes ??? No soup for me.

Nice video, Thanks Alan & Jim !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 10:54 am:

Pretty neat. I hope to do that with my touring this summer. Don't know if I'll shuck or grind corn, bale hay, or saw logs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Perigo on Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 10:50 pm:

Wonder where you would start to look for that kind of an attachment?

Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 12:21 am:

If someone could post some pictures and measurements, I think that one of those could be built without too much trouble. By searching through antique stores and attending farm sales and flea markets, I'll bet you could make it pretty period correct. I'd like to have one myself. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Perigo on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 06:53 am:

Does anyone know where an original one could be found for photos or maybe some early advertising pictures? We have a large steam show near me in the fall. I think it would really be interesting to a lot of people to see how T's were used for various jobs back in the day.

Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 07:37 am:

I 've run into them at farm sales before. They are pretty common. Most were hand cranked and they were difficult to turn,so it's no wonder they motorized them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Shawn Hayward on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 08:14 am:

I have an original,
but as usual I won't be out to the farm until the weekend, but then I can give you pics and the demensions
thanks
Shawn


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Hagstrom on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 09:26 am:

Alan, sweet vid of Jim's belt power attachment. Thanks for posting. It's amazing all of the variations of attachments that were made for the model T back in the day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 07:37 pm:

That particular attachment on Jim's truck is from the Sears & Roebuck catalog. It jacks up the rear end on both wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Shawn Hayward on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 09:45 pm:

Yes, it has 2 "saddles" that fit under the axle tubes, and lifts the differential , then a lever push's the two small iron wheels against the tires,
I will post some pics this weel of I can


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 10:39 pm:


I found this belt pulley last month. You replace a rear wheel with it to power the farm equipment of your choice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Tuesday, March 16, 2010 - 12:34 pm:

If you lift both rear wheels, I would think only the non-loaded wheel would turn. How does that work?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Tuesday, March 16, 2010 - 12:49 pm:

It has wheels that touch both tires. The pulley for running the shucker is a completely separate from the wheels of the truck. It's actually part of the attachment. You don't have to remove the wheels, just place the belt on the drive pulley, jack up the rear end, start the car, and put it in high gear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Shawn Hayward on Thursday, March 18, 2010 - 06:46 pm:


It has one of the drive wheels removed right now, (drivers side) but this is what it looks like


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Perigo on Thursday, March 18, 2010 - 09:00 pm:

Shawn,

Thank you for posting the pictures! Now, if I could just see one in action!! I'm going to try to catch a couple of shows in Illinois this summer to try to see one working.

Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Shawn Hayward on Thursday, March 18, 2010 - 09:08 pm:

I will set a spare axle on it this weekend,
that way people can see how it all fits together


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Hagstrom on Friday, March 19, 2010 - 12:16 pm:

Yes Shawn, appreciate your time taking those pics close up of one of these units and posting them for us.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Friday, March 19, 2010 - 12:40 pm:

Mr. Alan Mitchell, thank you for the post and the video, brought back lot's of memories. For the benefit of those who have not seen many of these, this is really a "corn sheller", not a "shucker or grinder", all different animals. Like Mr. Daron said, the hand cranked ones were a chore, and a mechanical one like this would have been welcomed with open arms. I still have several of the family ones that are hand cranked, but never had the good fortune to have one like this. One that I gave away had a flywheel almost 4 foot in diameter, once you got it going, it would shell a lot of corn. Thanks again Mr. Mitchell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Shawn Hayward on Friday, March 19, 2010 - 05:54 pm:



Here are some pictures of how it works


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By alan mitchell on Friday, March 19, 2010 - 09:13 pm:

Hey Shawn thanks for the photos, I think everyone should be able to understand how it works now.Roll it under the car, pull the levers,the wheels come up and foward resting on the rollers,add a belt and the machinery of your choice, put her in high and let your T do the hard work. Thanks to everyone for the interest


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin on Friday, March 19, 2010 - 09:21 pm:

Man I so need this :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lance Sorenson on Saturday, March 20, 2010 - 02:16 pm:

This looks easier to build and it has some good features. I don't know how you get off the darn thing!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Saturday, March 20, 2010 - 11:38 pm:

I'll be watching for one of those at farm auctions. Sometimes neat old stuff like that turns up, and it often sells dirt cheap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael K Mullis on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 03:24 pm:

Shawn
I lust after your power take off.
Thanks for the pics. I would love to own one but nothing like it ever shows up around here. I may just settle and build a simular set up... your pics helped alot.Very cool piece of equipment!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr. on Monday, December 06, 2010 - 12:51 pm:

The Model T Museum at Centerville, IN has one of these power take-off shaft assemblys.


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