OT 1915 Gypsy Van

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: OT 1915 Gypsy Van
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Tuesday, September 14, 2010 - 11:31 pm:

I wonder how this would be to tour with.

camper

"Roland and Mary Conklin of Huntington, N.Y., made house-car travel a family experience. Their bus factory built the Gypsy Van, shown above, and in the summer of 1915, the Conklin family set out to see America."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep (hiding in NZ) on Tuesday, September 14, 2010 - 11:45 pm:

Very nice


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Harper - Keene, New Hampshire on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 08:23 am:

YIIKES!!!

Can you imagine driving down a narrow washboard road in your wee Model T and confronting that gigantic beastie coming the other way? I tremble here at the keyboard. Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Faccin - Crystal Falls, Michigan on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 08:32 am:

With the length of the hood it must have a V12 to move that thing! :-) Is that the prototype for the troop carrier? Any ideas what it is?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 08:34 am:

Jason,

Thanks for sharing. Is there a larger image available?

Neil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 09:06 am:

This is when you really need to read those Bridge Height signs!-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 11:26 am:

Boats have fly bridges. Why not RV's. Would be like riding in a convertable with terrific views. Back below for bad weather. Must be lower than the lowest bridges.

Neil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By CharlieB-Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 11:43 am:

Do you think they rode with that "tent" up? I assumed it was for sleeping.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 12:14 pm:

I had a REO speedwagon camp bus many year ago. Chain drive and all. Engine was an F head with valves in the block and head. I was not able to restore it and hated to see it sitting, so I sold it to someone who was able to hire a restorer. I think it was 1922.

The drivers seat doubled as the toilet. Probably would have needed it going down long hills as it would have scared the S out of me.

Neil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush, Portland Oregon on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 12:32 pm:

It must have taken some time to see America in that! The clothes that they look to be wearing look much later then 1915. "confronting that gigantic beastie coming the other way", I like that description!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 01:07 pm:

I found it online while looking for information on Model T campers. It is the greatest resolution image I am aware of.

It is some were on http://www.oldwoodies.com/gallery-rv.htm. They have a lot of interesting pictures.

Here is the image on line with no associated information.

http://www.oldwoodies.com/img/rv/15conklin_gypsy-van.jpg

This is the Google link the directly goes to the image.

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.oldwoodies.com/img/rv/15conklin_gypsy-van.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.oldwoodies.com/gallery-rv.htm&usg=__d8YaFr9urrfTof5rIM6-JX3Lu4g=&h=347&w=500&sz=19&hl=en&start=1&sig2=ZWUH61vLd2xeqtgp7rTdtA&zoom=1&itbs=1&tbnid=1Gotri1yjL9ZCM:&tbnh=90&tbnw=130&prev=/images%3Fq%3D1915%2BGypsy%2Bvan%26hl%3Den%26gbv%3D2%26tbs%3Disch:1&ei=c_qQTOnYMcSAlAeC9bjjAQ


Here is another one from that same site; It states it is a “late 1920’s Ford Truck”, but I am not sure if it is and the resolution is very poor.

Ford Truck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A.J. "Art" Bell on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 02:01 pm:

http://www.coachbuilt.com/bui/a/american_motor_bus/american_motor_bus.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A.J. "Art" Bell on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 02:06 pm:

Hertz connection . . . .

Note this paragraph on the first page of the above link

"Two brothers, Stanley L. (b.1850-d.1920s) and Roland R. Conklin (b.1858-d.1936), were the driving force behind two New York and Chicago based bus manufacturers, the (Roland) Gas-Electric Motorbus Co. and American Motor Bus Co. While most of their contemporaries are long forgotten, the Conklins had the good fortune to become associated with Chicago's taxicab king John D. Hertz who purchased their bus manufacturing business in 1921, eventually turning it into the world's largest motor coach manufacturer."

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 03:31 pm:

I posted this earlier. Here it is again. Love these old campers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 03:51 pm:

It must have jarred the teeth loose in those kiddies solid rubber tires and that heavy suspension!


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