Non "T"- the 1988 old car market

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Non "T"- the 1988 old car market
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Sutherland on Friday, November 26, 2010 - 09:48 pm:

A look back at an Old Car Trader from 1988-a few surprises with the exception of the T market.
http://www.mystarcollectorcar.com/2-features/editorials/947-could-you-retire-in-2010-from-selling-classic-old-cars-you-bought-in-1988-a-monday-morning-quarterback-look-back.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Friday, November 26, 2010 - 10:29 pm:

That's a neat read! When you mention "Old Car Trader" are you talking about those issues with green & yellow or blue & yellow covers(at least in the mid 80s they were like this)?

I used to read those all the time as a kid, my dad made a habit of buying one regularly.

He was big into 50s Fords back then, I remember he bought a '55 Ford Convert for $3200 at an auction in 1983 & drove it home. It was an amatuer restoration, but now $3200 won't even hardly buy a '55 Convert parts car.

Back then at the shows you saw nothing but pre WW2 stuff, now it's the opposite!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Saturday, November 27, 2010 - 02:20 am:

DENNNIS: (yup, same one).
"You ought to be throwing passes for the Rams, you nailed that on the button Mr. Quarterback. Most 65 year old “Baby Boomers” like me won’t be watching Barrett-Jackson, lamenting fondly about the car we took our girlfriends for their first back seat ride in, 10 or 15 years from now. But there’s a plus to this, we won’t be around to watch some sucker pay 20 times what it’s worth for a Toyota Prius, a Honda Element, or a Chevy Volt, either."
I drive my Mrs. nutz watching all the auctions and constantly saying, "I had one of those", all night.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By eric flower on Saturday, November 27, 2010 - 11:23 am:

My dad had a 1965 corvette that he got new he also drove it off the truck...Dad ordered it with the 396 425hp big block "1st year for a big block "....There were always guys trying to buy it but that was his baby...He could tell you anything about it but when asked when your sons B-day is he didnt know...lol..It was ok I knew how he loved it

I can remember around 1987 a guy had cash in hand but dad wouldn't sell it and mom was kind of mad.. but when he did sell it in 2004 it had 14,800 miles on it and it still smelled like new ...he got $100,000 for it
these pics are from a guy who bought it from the guy who got it from dad




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Saturday, November 27, 2010 - 11:40 am:

This is their opinion on Model T's. I thought it was a little disturbing and not always true. I'm probably more of the muscle car generation but Model T's are a lot more fun. :-)

Quote
"But like anything that looks too good to be true, there are landmines in old car speculation and in this case the landmines are the older cars. Model Ts, for example ranged from 5-15,000 and as the T guys will tell you, they're selling for a lot closer to 5 than 15K in 2010.

The simple reason is that the guys who really coveted these cars are dead and the herd has been thinned out, so yes-there will be day when a vintage Camaro will quit going up and eventually drop. It's inevitable."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Saturday, November 27, 2010 - 03:02 pm:

John, I'm sure what Jerry was trying to get across in his article is that it's a generational thing.
We all long for the cars of our youth. I'm a muscle car generation guy too and I had my share.
My T was destined to be a Hot Rod when I bought it, that was all my muscle car roots could see.
It was just too complete and original for me to cut up. So, instead of making the car fit "my generation", which seemed the most likely thing to do at the time, I moved back 2 generations, to the technology of my grandparents.
Not the least bit sorry I did either. Model T's ARE more fun. Anybody can drive a Camaro.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Saturday, November 27, 2010 - 03:26 pm:

Dennis, I know Jerry was passing on an article about the increase of muscle cars. What I was commenting on was what the article said about Model T's. Hey, I wanted a Model T when I had a muscle car. I just didn't want to spend my life chasing parts. When I found out about the parts network, I was in like Flynn. ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Saturday, November 27, 2010 - 06:28 pm:

I think the theory is wrong, as well as his pricing analysis. Old Car Trader was a much more common place to sell antique and muscle cars in 1988 than it is today. So it is a good place to see typical prices of 1988.

Today Old Car Trader is capturing a very small part of the collector car market, and only the lower end of it. Most collector cars are advertised and sold on eBay or one of the other online services. Only a few people are crazy enough to sell a collector car using a printed advertisement as the only means of reaching customers.

I disagree that Model T ownership age has anything to do with value. Check the price of a 1910 National, or a 1910 Packard, or a 1910 Perrless. They are today worth 50 times what they were worth in 1988. Model T's have not gone down in value either, they just have not gone up as rapidly as the muscle cars and some 1950's cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, November 27, 2010 - 09:27 pm:

I always wanted early automobiles. When I was in high school, one of the other students had a Plymouth "Super-Bird". It was one of the few real top end ones. I drove a 1929 REO. I have never owned a muscle car. (Except for my gray T race car. It is the only car I ever spun-a-donut with.)
Drive safe, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Sunday, November 28, 2010 - 01:47 am:

John, Jerry Sutherland and his twin brother own and operate "My Star Collector Car .com" out in Calif. I talk with them on a regular basis. He's the author of the article. In fact, I'm the guy that suggested he check this site out and (good or bad) probably why you'll find an article out of "My Star" here once in a while.
I'm the only guy in my crowd of "Baby Boomers", who own "collector cars" that has an original Model T. My last (fiberglass) "Model T" had a Dodge Hemi in it. I never had a "love" for Model T's, I saw an old car for sale one day and bought it on pure impulse. I'm probably more the (baby Boomer) rule, than the exception. It's only since I bought a complete, running, Model T totally by accident, that I've become a real Model T lover, thanks to a lot of help from the folks who post here.
Jerry's article is "generally" correct. Most of the guys my age (65) are whining about what all the cars they sold for pennies are worth today, including me.
Model T's and Model A's were something you made Hot Rods out of. Granted, there are a lot of "Baby Boomers" on this site who own Model T's but don't forget, this is a specialty site.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Sunday, November 28, 2010 - 02:21 am:

Royce, I'll be the first one to admit that I was disappointed when I found out through posting here, that Model T's aren't worth a fortune. Like most of the uninformed, I figured that a 27 Ford was probably worth as much as a 27 Packard, or Chevy, or Plymouth, or whatever.
I didn't give a thought to the fact that 15 million of em were made and there are still many of them on the road.
None of that matters to me now. The fact that I've got more money in my car already than I'll ever get out of it is inconsequential. I didn't buy it as an investment, I bought it to drive.
I'm probably always going to be kind of an "outsider" here because I didn't set out to buy a Model T to restore. The car I bought that day could have just as easily have been a Chevy but I'm sure glad it wasn't. I don't have Jay Leno's garage to fabricate parts in and I've met a bunch of really cool, helpful people here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Sorenson on Sunday, November 28, 2010 - 01:15 pm:

For me growing-up in 50's-60's I always wanted a Model T..At 13 I spent $25.00 on a trailer full of parts and a "TT" truck...I spent all my "lawn-mowin'" $$ on that truck.....In So.Cal in the late 60's surfin' was cool and so were Old Woodies......I had a 1939,the front doors were screwed shut and you climbed out the window.....$10.00 and my 10-speed bike is what I paid for that....through the years I had 5 woodies and countless Model T's.........When I see the prices on Woodies $$$$$$ I don't understand.....I too drive my wife crazy lookin' on-line for an affordable one and about the one's I sold......I was about to get rid of both my T's and "all" the parts along with "HER 71 VW conv." the otherday......Just to haul home a 1947 Merc.Woodie on a trailer....that didn't even run !! This old car thing is like bein' hooked on drugs......Now that I'm back on earth,,,I decided to keep the Ts that are drivable and have fun with them.....Tryin' to recapture your youth is not as easey @ 62.....Thankyou for letting get this off my chest.........Kinda' cold outside right now,24*,maybe later I'll take the T WOODIE (depot hack) fer a spin......Carl aka Spanky


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Sunday, November 28, 2010 - 05:46 pm:

I was a So. Cal. kid too Carl. Back in the "Surfin USA" days, I had a 51 Ford Country Squire (woodie)wagon and a 51 Ford Victoria 2 Dr hard top at the same time. I only had 1 running Flathead though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Sutherland on Wednesday, December 08, 2010 - 03:50 pm:

I really do believe that collecting is a generational thing.

The guys in their 40s now who covet the early 70s iron like Cudas and 70 SS454 Chevelles are going to cede the domestic collecting title to their kids in 15-20 years.

Those same kids are far more interested in facebook than Firebirds so I'm guessing that the prices on cars like that have spiked.

One the other hand, cars like vintage Packards and Deusenbergs seem to have rallied in a big way-and they never fell as dramatically. Those will always be blue chip investments because they have ascended to rare art status.

I can only base the price of an average T on conversations with owners-they seemed resigned to the fact that they have leveled out.

Conversely,the Hemi-Cuda has a long way to fall.

On a much happier note, I did a 24 Cars of Christmas piece on the T-I think it's going to be far more positive than a price analysis.


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