Engine side pans.

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Engine side pans.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 04:39 pm:

I have a pair of nice repro engine pans that I want to install on my 1926 coupe. Last week, I asked a question about how to install the two engine side pans on each side of the engine and was told they attach to the underside of the engine oil pan flange and the underside of the bottom leg of the chassis channel. Only problem is, none of the holes that are pnched into the engine pans match the two factory holes in the chassis on each side of the engine. The two factory drilled chassis holes are for the long carriage head bolts that go all the way through both channel legs to secure the hood shelves in place and are secured under the bottom of the frame with square nuts.

For those of you who have installed these engine side pans, what is the best way to do this? Since none of the holes match up, I'm already going to have to drill two holes in each engine side pan to match the holes of the hood shelf carriage head bolts. If I do this and secure the engine side pans in place using the hood shelf bolts, do you think this will be enough to hold it or should more holes be drilled in the chassis using the holes punched in the pans? I don't want to tighten the nuts holding the hood shelf carriage head bolts too much, because they will begin to dimple in and since my car is very shiney, and reflective, it will be very apparent.

Please don't advise me not to put the engine side pans in. I am definitely going to install them to minimize dust and road dirt coming into the cab through the engine compartment, I just need to know the best way how... Thank you. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph W. Rudzik on Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 04:59 pm:

Jim,
I have the pans on all my T's and I put them on by loosening the necessary engine bolts, leavint the nut on above the engine.
Then, you can "tilt" the pan and put the flanges for the bolt on the bottom side of the engine then I swing the pan up to the frame rail and on the long bolt and nut it.
By mayself, usually, I put a boxin wrench on the top nut on the engine and tighten from below. If you have two, even easier.
Hope this helps ya.

Joe R.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 05:41 pm:

Those pans are usually the first thing on a Model T that is taken off and thrown away.
I have them on my '14 touring and they are a pain in the back side when working on the T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph W. Rudzik on Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 05:53 pm:

Agreed Richard,
If I have to take the starter off the pan has to be loosened.
However, it's still nice to keep some of the water off.

Joe R.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Gelfer on Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 05:56 pm:

What year did they start putting the side pans on the Model T? I don't think they are on 1912 and earlier ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Boe on Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 06:07 pm:

John,
Someone else will chime in here. I think that all Model T's came with them. The super early cars also had pans on the transmission.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H on Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 06:17 pm:

It must be just the LHD cars that it's a pain. Never had any problem with mine being in the way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach, Ca on Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 10:40 pm:

I took off the right side one because the 12 hood doesn't have any louvers and the air coming in thru the new radiator has no way of getting out. This really helped on the very hot days when going slow. The passenger floorboards stay much cooler now. YMMV


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 02:52 am:

Have pans on my cars. Never have found them to be in the way of anything. They keep the engine cleaner and aid in engine cooling. Plus if you drop a part or a tool it will be right there instead of in the dirt on the ground.

Every Model T came with engine pans originally. Transmission pans were original from 1909 - 1912.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 05:12 am:

Jim,
My originals fit as you describe. On mine the holes align with the long bolts which hold the hood shelves on, so drill your panels to suit.

I jettisoned mine because they do get in the way when working on the car.

Allan from down under


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 11:52 am:

Thank you everyone. What I think I will do is drill two 3/4" diameter holes in line with the hood shelf bolt holes so the holes are large enough for the square nuts to seat against the underside surface of the frame; then drill two holes and tapping them for securing the side pans with bolts only, as it is very difficult to secure the nuts to the bolts with the side pans blocking access to the top of the bottom channel. That way, when I want to remove the side pans for working on the engine, I can do so without loosening the hood shelf, which, if loosened, might scratch the fender and splash shield if bumped while working on the engine. Also, if I want to start the engine to make adjustments with the side pans off and the hood shelves loose, the vibration won't cause the loose hood shelves to vibrate against and scratch the fenders and splash shields. Also, The bolts threaded into each side of the underside of the frame, will give me a good place to ground my headlights and my engine block to my heavily primed and "Imron painted frame, without having to scrape the paint down to the bare steel. Thanks again. Jim Patrick"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By DAREL J. LEIPOLD on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 12:48 pm:

I have a pair of original side pans from my 1910 Touring. I replaced them with repros, but may try to rework the originals.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 01:14 pm:

Whatever you do, don't drill those holes 3/4"! I have a NOS one, and those holes are 5/16". If you need to locate them, take off one of the long hood sill bolts, and use a scribe to outline the location of the hole in the paint, and then do the other one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 01:38 pm:

The reason I want to drill 3/4" holes in the engine pans is so that the holes will clear the two nuts holding the hood shelf in place. There are already (2)5/16 holes punched at the front and back corners of each of the side pans which will be used to position, then drill and tap the 5/16" holes in bottom channel leg of the frame.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 01:54 pm:

Jim

Might work out. One way to custom your parts on the T.

But removing the shield for repairs is easy, on the '24 touring have removed it many times. The long carriage bolt is locked in the wood under the hood shelf, so that bolt head just won't turn on you to scratch the paint.



And underside, the shield is held by the square nuts, and a couple of block to pan bolts, easy to remove IMHO.

Original dust shields on the carb side of my '24.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 02:32 pm:

Thanks Dan. Lookin' good! Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bill siebert on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 08:43 pm:

We used to get rid of them because they were fire hazards. The oil that dripped on them would collect dirt and the dirt would collect more oil. At this point gas would leak onto them and the exhaust leaking past the gaskets would start things going.

None of this would happen if they were gone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 10:27 pm:

By the same token it would not happen if they were clean?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Friday, December 03, 2010 - 11:40 pm:

My leaks are sealed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 01:22 am:

If you have an accessory heater installed, like the ones that have a tube clamped on over the exhaust pipe that directs warm air up through the floorboard through a grate in the floor, will the pans help keep the air warmer going into the heater tube intake? It looks to me that they would help by keeping the cooler air from coming up from under the car. Anyone have any experience with such a setup? Many thanks, Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bill siebert on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 07:42 am:

But Kenneth, cleaning them is only a temporary solution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Harper - Keene, New Hampshire on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 08:01 am:

But Bill, fixing the leaks is a permanent solution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timmy Pittman on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 09:02 am:

Make sure you have the correct engine to the car. I made the mistake of ordering 18s and I had a 21 engine. Starter car vs. non starter car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 10:16 am:

It's a '26 with the original engine with an engine number that matches the chassis number.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bill siebert on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 01:23 pm:

Kenneth, I'll leave my pans off. I won't have to deal with either cleaning or fixing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 03:48 pm:

This is one of the rara times i agree with Royce! I have mine and think if they were not needed would have Henry have used them? Bill has his reason for not and i have mine fore but it's your model T so do what makes you happy! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach, Ca on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 06:40 pm:

Royce, Please explain how the pans "aid in engine cooling" Your brass car doesn't have any louvers in the hood just like mine. Don't you think between the pans covering the bottom around the engine and the hood on the sides air flow is more restricted thru the radiator? I like to see the pans in place but I believed that my engine did run cooler when I removed the passenger/exhaust side to allow the hot air to escape from the engine compartment. I can tell you that it does help collect parts that fall off like an oil filler cap. Now I have a magnet glued on the inside of mine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin, Branch/Lafayette, LA on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 07:39 pm:

They might work to better create a sort of tunnel. That would keep airflow in one direction?

I think i will put some on my car. If they are just gutter shaped like what Dan Treace has then I may just make them myself instead of shelling out the $100 or so they cost. I really like the idea that they can be used as a tool tray :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, December 04, 2010 - 07:58 pm:

I think mine do act as a wind tunnel on the 14! Also to help out i never reinstalled the little half moon pice of sheet metal over the hogshead in the lower dash. The floor mat wants to raise a little but the car runs cool? Wern't the hood louvers only to let the noise of the latter horn out? Bud.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration