Shorpy Photo - 1925 TT Truck with Interesting Body

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Shorpy Photo - 1925 TT Truck with Interesting Body
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 06:03 am:

An interesting Shorpy posting of a 'brand new' TT with specialist body fitted out. This is a single ratio (standard) axle job:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/9451?size=_original



Close up of the rear axle area:



Front - note the battery fitting:



The "Office" and windscreen detail:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Ohio on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 06:24 am:

This body looks like it could be a contractors work truck with tool boxes and ladder racks. Thanks for posting it's very interesting to see these different type of trucks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - Lyons, GA on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 06:41 am:

I like the tread pattern on the rear wheels. Wonder why there's no tire on the spare rim?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker - Sumter, SC on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 09:42 am:

Adrian – I always enjoy your “photo finds.” It is neat to look back in time, especially on a new or nearly new vehicle. Thank you for finding and posting them.

Note also the driver’s side front hub. It appears to have some sort of accessory odometer attached over the standard hub to help keep track of the mileage.



Does anyone know what the box on the upper part of the cab with the screen on it was used for? Note the bows that can be moved back to provide support for a cover over the bed.



Hal – in the photo above you will also notice that in addition to the front spare rim NOT having a tire the rear spare rim also does NOT have a tire.

On page 329 of Bruce’s Book “Model T Ford” under a photo of a new 1923 runabout that has demountable tires but only a demountable rim on the back he states, “Note that spare tires were an extra on all Fords even though a spare rim was furnished as a part of the demountable wheel package.” Of course the dealer would encourage the new customer to purchase a spare tire and tube to be mounted onto the rim and may have kept a few spares already made up so all they had to do was swap out the empty rim for one with the tire already mounted. Bruce did not specifically address the TT in those comments so it may have been done differently for them – but clearly this new chassis with an aftermarket body has two new looking spare rims without any tires or tubes.

Note also that the running board is the style introduced during 1925. It is a little longer than the ones used 1918 – early 1925 that stopped near very close to the rear running board bracket. The later 1925-1927 extended past the bracket.

I wish the photo had shown the type of pedals on the transmission. In the photo the pedal slots are visible but not the pedals. If you look at the license plate it is attached with two leather straps and appears to have been used for a while with dents, dirt, scrapes, etc. It also starts with a “D” and I would guess it is a Dealer’s plate to allow the new truck to be driven from the body place to the dealer’s lot etc. Clearly it is a 1925 plate. But I believe the truck in the photo could be either a 1925 if it had the older style pedals or a 1926 model if it had the later style pedals and that the same license tag would have been used by the dealer up until Jan 1, 1926 or when ever Colorado required the dealer to purchase the 1926 dealer tags.

I cannot easily see if there is or is not a coil box on the dash – but I haven’t looked really hard. On page 406 of Bruce’s book (also in his CD – page 34 of the 1926-27 coverage) he shows two factory photos of the 1926 TT. It appears one does and one does not have a the coil box on the dash. Does anyone know if the 1926-1927 TT chassis was produced one way more than the other with the placement of the coil box? I also cannot make out the switch plate in the photo. I think it is the rectangular 1925 and earlier one – but Ford often used up older parts and often would put them on the trucks to use them up. For example the trucks were the ones to use up the left over non-starter block engines. Ref: http://mtfca.com/encyclo/doc19.htm

JUN 5, 1919 Acc. 78, #436, Ford Archives
All cars to have starter-type engines; trucks to get whatever non-starter engines are left.

So Ford could have easily continued to use the 1925 and earlier parts on the 1926 trucks. I don’t know if he did or not – but if anyone has additional information to confirm or correct that guess, please let us know.

Again thank you Adrian for finding and posting the photos along with the links when they are available.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l915 Model T Ford Touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By eric flower on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 01:28 pm:

I'm always amazed of the detail of these old pic's....Love when they are posted


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 01:44 pm:

Hap, lots of good observations as usual. My only quibble would be that it's Dist. Col. (Washington, DC), as a lot of these large format Shorpy views are.

The box behind the cab has a screened opening. I wonder if it's intended to house some sort of critter.

Anybody know what the bracket to the left of the tail light is for?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thunder on the Plains of Colorado on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 02:16 pm:

"Does anyone know what the box on the upper part of the cab with the screen on it was used for? Note the bows that can be moved back to provide support for a cover over the bed."

Hap. My guess would be the canvas for the top. That would save the side box for something work related.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A.J. "Art" Bell on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 02:44 pm:

It is still not uncommon to see new ‘Cab and Chassis’ or ‘Cowl and Chassis’
trucks in the dealer lot with a bare rim mounted for the spare.

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 03:26 pm:

I'll take a guess at the photo. I'll guess this is a Utility body used by a plumber. Truck boxes/beds are referred as bodies and of course the passenger compartment is called the cab. It has pipe racks, and lots of little pigeon holes for pipe fittings etc. The vented box on top could have been to store cans of sealants and tar, pipe dope etc., that needed protected and yet had to be vented to prevent extreme heat build up.

I think the utility body it's self is not new. I think it was installed from a former vehicle. In the commercial vehicle world this is quite common. Many truck bodies out last the cab and chassis. This is common , even today. The Body has lots of little dings and a very sloppy broom paint job. The runners look a bit spraddled out. The corner bead in the edge of the wood floor deck looks a bit bunged up. The Veeder mileage meter has been painted to match the wheel.

I reserve the right to be wrong on any or all of this information except this.
Art you are correct. I bought a new commercial cab and chassis several years ago and it had empty rim bolted to the frame.

I also think the two little tykes on the homade sidwalk racer is a great part of this photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Ohio on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 03:48 pm:

If the truck was used by a plumber then maybe the screen box on top was for the drain SNAKES!...ha-ha-ha-


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker - Sumter, SC on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 04:14 pm:

Steve -- good catch – you are correct it is a Washington DC license tag.

Thunder -- you could be correct about the box. But I wonder if the canvas for the truck bed bows may be what we see stored/folded on the roof of the cab? If only the photo could talk more!

John -- I agree that many times the commercial bodies are reused. But in this case -- that body looks really nice to have had much use. But as you pointed out there are places where it clearly does NOT look new. I.e. where the work men would climb up into the back of the bed – it is worn down there on the side with the ladder/step while not worn nearly as much on the other side. It obviously is not currently being used on a job – as there are no tools or parts on it. Something in between the “new truck” and the “new truck with the old body” would be a one year old truck or so that was refurbished by a dealer to sell. Just a thought. I think your suggestion of the screen on the box to let the fumes out is clearly one possibility.

Denny -- probably not for the "drain snakes" -- but the best comical use of the vented box so far suggested.


Respectfully submitted,

Hap l915 Model T Ford Touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A.J. "Art" Bell on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 04:42 pm:

Could be a dealers demo that’s been climbed on by half the tradesmen in the state.
Some how we have christened it a 'Plumbers' truck, but many other trades could make
as good or better use of this configuration.
Here is a full view of the truck only.



Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 04:54 pm:

I would say plumber because of the pipe racks.It allmost ressembled a glass hauling bed for store fronts but the arms turn down and dont look removable or turnable.Would be interesting to know what company built the bed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 04:56 pm:

I meant up.Oops


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 05:10 pm:

It could have been used as an Electricians truck, Phone company, It might even have sewer snakes in the cage on top.;) Who knows? That's why I stated my disclaimer. I think it would be safe to "Christen" it as a "Service Truck".

One thing about the picture that puzzles me is what's going on with the radiator shell and radiator neck? Is it just the angle of the picture?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A.J. "Art" Bell on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 05:14 pm:

You could be right on the pipe rack use, but I instantly thought ‘ladder’.
So many little cubby holes is a teaser as well, but I fear that the vented
box on top holds the secret of this rigs use. It’s also difficult to tell if there
was meant to be a slide-in tailgate.

Regards
Art
Ps. Every plumber I know would have that back step bent out of shape
in the first couple of days <g>


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 05:25 pm:

Art, That's funny but you need to remember people were smaller back then. :-)




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White, Sheridan, MI on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 08:27 pm:

The box on top held the carrier pigeons. Predated cell phones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - Lyons, GA on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 08:28 pm:

John,

I think the hood is just unlatched and maybe not centered up in the little saddles.

Hap,

Now that you mention it, I do remember reading that they came with spare rim only. I had forgotten that. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker - Sumter, SC on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 08:44 pm:

John,

I had to go out to the garage and look at my T to see if that radiator illusion could be duplicated. And yes I can get the side of my radiator hidden by the hood side if I get the angle right. I move towards the car and look forward towards the hood and lights while my head is about even with the hood hinge. When I do that I can get the radiator to just be visible on the top and sort of disappear on the side.

In the case of the truck I believe the brace that is going up to the windshield is causing some of the illustion. The line slanted forward I believe is the shadow of the brace. And the line slanted rearward I believe is the reflection of the brace on the shine paint on the hood. Note the sun appears to be from the rear based on the shadows at the rear of the truck – the step and its shadow on the ground.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l915 Model T Ford Touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Sunday, December 05, 2010 - 09:34 pm:

Hal and Hap. I can see it now that you guys point it out. The hood is up out of the saddles and sort of haphazardly flopped across where it should be. My "Minds eye" was operating on the assumption the hood was buttoned down and ready to go and the bottom of the radiator was slid out several inches and the radiator neck was cut down. Thanks for setting me straight. Hap you didn't need to go out and check, but thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Ohio on Monday, December 06, 2010 - 09:18 am:

Hap,

If he is not keeping snakes in the screened box, perhaps it's his "Mother-in-Law" seat!

There also is a wide rim or ring in the back of the truck. Perhaps for rolling up hoses or electrical wire on. The long lower steel loop on the back would be a step with a grab handle just above and the hook on the lower back could be to hang a canvas bucket on. Electricians still use canvas buckets to carry parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - Lyons, GA on Monday, December 06, 2010 - 01:19 pm:

They didn't have cell phones or cb's in 1925. The screened box contained carrier pidgeons so he could let the boys back at the shop know he needed them to bring additional tools or supplies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer, Saginaw, MI on Monday, December 06, 2010 - 01:41 pm:

tt truck light

Grether lantern

Sorry I couldn't get the first picture bigger but I reproduce a lantern that would have fit on the peg shown. These were mainly used on fire trucks but with a red lens it could have been used as a rear running light when needed or some other lantern wired into the the lighting system could have placed there. Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker - Sumter, SC on Monday, December 06, 2010 - 05:13 pm:

Bob,

I was thinking the bracket might be for a lantern also but I was thinking the “blade style” tail lamps were last used by Ford on the 1914 models and I was thinking by 1925 if it was built for a Ford chassis, they would have had the single bolt style mount.

Denny – I’m fairly sure that the round object in the back of the truck is the rim for the rear wheel spare tire. And just as the front rim does not have a tire, so I believe the rear wheel rim was provided without a tire in this photo.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Runabout.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White, Sheridan, MI on Monday, December 06, 2010 - 06:06 pm:

Hal, Seems there's an echo in here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Monday, December 06, 2010 - 06:11 pm:

Gary, They say "Great minds think alike" Not knowing either one of you, I'll leave it at that. :-)


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