Location of neutral on left pedal.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Location of neutral on left pedal.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By M. C. Hawker on Tuesday, December 07, 2010 - 11:31 am:

I recently got up nerve to start my unrestored garage find 27TT. All it ended up really needing was a cleaned and coated fuel tank and redoing the vaporizor carb. New tires, tubes and flaps of course. Generator and mag work fine but the switch is flaky in the mag position.

No adjustments were made to any bands or linkages. Both brakes work better than I was led to believe.

Now, the reason for this inquiry...I have a perfect free neutral, but the neutral position on the left pedal is not half way down, as has been mentioned here innumerable times. My pedal engages high without any slippage, being very firm on engagement. Low pedal is from 50% travel down to near the floorboards. Neutral is around 25-30% travel.

This is my first T and my two trips around the neighborhood are the only times I have driven a T, so I have no knowledge of the optimum setup of the transmission. i have made several requests to my local club, of which I joined, for someone experienced in the nuances of the T to stop by and drive "Henrietta" and give me an honest opinion as to what still needs done mechanically. Unfortunately, I have had no response from any club member, so I am rather flying blind.

Is the position of neutral at 25-30% travel indicative of wear or misadjustment? Is the external linkage off slightly?

Or am I just a worry wart?

Thanks for any inputs.

Tony


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher Lang - Brentwood Bay BC on Tuesday, December 07, 2010 - 11:51 am:

For what it's worth:

The high to neutral happens in my car, after depressing the pedal about an inch and a half, or two inches. I also have a nice free neutral (when warmed up), and no slipping in high, so I don't worry about it. I just yank both levers down, and go!

I'm sure someone will chime in with more, and perhaps already has!
I'm anxious to hear the other responses.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - Lyons, GA on Tuesday, December 07, 2010 - 12:45 pm:

Sounds perfectly normal to me. "Half way" is kinda a misnomer, not to be taken literally. "In between" might be a better discription. If it goes into LOW near, but not touching, the floor board, and it goes into HIGH with no slippage, and you have a good NEUTRAL for cranking and stopping at stop signs, then I'd say you are good to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris Big Bear Lake, California on Tuesday, December 07, 2010 - 01:17 pm:

M.C.Hawker. Ford made over 15,000,000 Model T's and no two are exactly alike or at least are not alike due to wear. The clutch pedal linkage has several adjustments and the system will work very well when adjusted properly and sometime will work well enough even when not adjusted properly. There are some places in the links that wear out so that a pin can wear into an oval shape and the hole it rides in will also wear into an oval shape. This makes a sloppy link with some play in it but it will still work. I have called the round thing a pin but it might be a bolt. In any case the linkages are simple but they wear out and need to be fixed some times when they can't be adjusted any more.

The high speed clutch is also operated by these sloppy linkages and so at times you can still be coming out of low band while the high speed clutch is trying to engage.

It is an art to get all of the linkages adjusted correctly so that nothing slips and nothing grabs. It is easier to adjust things when the pins and holes are round. You can get on your back and get under there and take a pin out of a hole to inspect things. You can take a vernier caliper and check the hole to find out that it may be several thousandths of an inch larger in diameter in one way than the other. this is where the slop comes in to play. The more out of round the hole is the more slop you have in the movement. When you check the diameter of the pin you may find as much as .040" or more out of round and this will cause trouble when adjusting. When a pin is worn out of round and is twisted or turned to adjust it, the adjustment is not constant because of the out of round condition. You can tighten a pin yet it will move to a larger gap and actually loosen the adjustment. This makes old ladies weep and little children run away. But such is the life of a Model T adjuster.

The trick is to adjust the mechanisms together as a unit so that the low speed band becomes loose and is no longer locked onto the transmission drum which will give you neutral. As your foot continues to release the left pedal, the link starts to operate the high speed clutch and you begin to go into high gear. You must have this neutral place so that you are not in high and not in low. That is the adjustment that you must get so you can start the engine and not have the car run over you. This also makes for a smooth driving car.

All of the adjusting parts are available and replacement of theese parts makes adjusting much easier. The high speed clutch lever sticks out of the rear of the transmission cover or hogs head. the holes in that lever wear into oval shapes and cause bad action. It is difficult to remove that lever and shaft assembly to rework the holes with new bushings to make it perfect and a lot of folks just live with it. I have at times enlarged the holes to the next size and used larger pins in the levers in order to get a nice smooth action. Just go slow, look carefully and ask questions as you go. There are a lot of folks here with a lot of good information. Don't ever take just one person's word but listen to the group as a whole. They are a good bunch of guys, even the ones who sound mean and nasty at times.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, December 07, 2010 - 01:24 pm:

If you remove the floorboard and watch the pedal as you depress it, you will find that it will go straight down for part of the travel, and then it will start to move toward the transmission as you continue to push it. You might be able to feel a slightly more resistance right at the point it starts to move inward. That point where it stops moving straight down and starts to move inward is the neutral. If you depress it farther than that you will start applying the low. You will also hear a dragging noise when it starts to engage low.

When you are waiting for a signal to change hold the pedal down enough to achieve neutral but not enough to slip the low band. If this is a problem to you, pull the brake lever into the neutral position and rest your left leg until the light changes.

Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By M. C. Hawker on Wednesday, December 08, 2010 - 05:01 am:

Thanks so very much for the prompt replies fellas.

They just reinforce my gut feeling that all is well and the TT is in very good mechanical shape, considering her advanced age!

Next project is to fix that blasted ignition switch that needs jiggling to find contact for the mag. I haven't tried to start her on mag yet. Also, the roof leaks!

Tony


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Wednesday, December 08, 2010 - 11:14 am:

I keep Ben Martins rebuilt switchs in stock danuser88@socket.net


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