Will this trailer haul a touring car?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Will this trailer haul a touring car?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robbie Williams on Thursday, December 09, 2010 - 10:48 pm:

Other than the el-cheapo construction, will a trailer like this accommodate a Model T touring car?

http://www.trailerworld.com/viewproduct.cgi?id=884

The size is listed as 7' wide x 7' tall x 16' long.
I'm guessing that this is the width of the body - or is it the wheel width?

Anybody pulling a similar trailer?
Where can I go in the KY area for a 7' tall / enclosed trailer?

Thanks !! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dana crosby on Thursday, December 09, 2010 - 11:09 pm:

That is a much more modern trailer than mine. I see no reason at all for you to worry about a T Touring in it. You may have to put the top down. I wish my trailer had the drop down door/ramp. Mine has "barn" doors and was built in 1955 but keeps on rolling whether the T is in it or the Morris Minor or the Corvette or.......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel Denis Chicoine, MD on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 12:39 am:

AS the owner of a 23 touring and recent purchaser of a trailer, perhaps I can comment. You will have no trouble getting the touring into and tied down in this trailer. Make sure it has good accessory brakes and can be wired to the pulling vehicle's brakes. I have a somewhat similar trailer that works well, but really sucks my fuel down. The V front isn't as sharp as I'd like. Mine is 8 feet tall. I only wanted 7 1/2 feet. My touring is 82 inches tall with the top up. With a 7 foot inside height, you may have trouble clearing the rear top of the door, although the rear wheels will be lower, on the ramp, when the top goes through, and may give you clearance. A rear "beaver tail" that lowers the rear end several inches under the door is nice. Depending on how wide the transverse top rails are in the trailer, you may contact them with the top up, especially if you encounter bumps in the road. I use my trailer for winter storage as well and want the top up while in the trailer. The best thing to do is try to put your T in the trailer with the top up and see if it fits. It will certainly fit with the top down. It is not fun to have to put the top down, fighting rain, to load it into the trailer. Good Luck
Noel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By willie k cordes on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 12:57 am:

Robbie, A very pointed front does wonders to cut the wind and improve your mileage on your tow vehicle. A sharp down slope on the front does the same thing. I would not buy a blunt front trailer. It is like pulling a parachute.
Remember if you ever want to put a coupe or sedan in the trailer, those tops do not go down.
I would measure before I buy, 7' should be enough height if the door is a full height opening door.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 01:17 am:

I've got an extra 6" height above my roof and 2 roof vents with vent covers that allows you to leave the vents open if it rains. on a hot sunny day enclosed trailers get very hot. The extra height and vents help. V-nose was $200. more and well worth it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 01:50 am:

I am on my second trailer. Both had 16' bed length with 20' overall length from ball to back end. The first trailer was a Haulmark car hauler with sloped front nose that was supposed to improve gas mileage but they would not guarantee it nor did they publish any data on even a typical savings reported by any customers. They did continue to tout it as a good idea however. I was not fond of this first trailer because as with the one that is pictured above, the side door is too far back along the side. With the sloped front end roof line I was told the side door could not be mounted further forward where I wanted it. Actually this was BS since I later discovered they could have in fact mounted it one more stud length forward but that would not be "standard" and would have taken more time. With this 16' bed and that door location you will find that you cannot get in and out of the trailer when your T is loaded in there because its front fender and wheel will just block that door and you will have to wiggle past it. I hated it for that reason. I could not get a tool box or cooler in or out of that door once the T was in there. On one trip from St. Charles, IL to Abilene, KS I had the odd situation of pulling my T to Abilene with my sloped trailer on the way there and swapping trailers with my friend John Barr and pulling my T back home in his trailer - same tow vehicle ('97 Ford Expedition, Auto Trans, 4.6L V8) - both trailers nearly identical tandem axle trailers. His trailer is a foot longer, same height but basically the flat front end (slightly curved but no sloped nose roof line like mine) - guess which trailer did the best gas wise - you guessed it. Almost no measurable difference and I religiously drove exactly the speed limit both ways since I wanted to know for myself. Since I came and went on the same weekend with good weather both ways and almost zero wind - it was as scientific a test as any other although not a wind tunnel of course. The flat front end trailer improved the gas mileage coming home by a very small amount if the trailer itself had anything to do with it. The weight of both trailers was very nearly identical. The frontal area was the same (both had same width and height). Since I didn't have a powerful tow vehicle to start with - I would have expected more savings - not so. The second trailer I have now is standard curved front - door all the way forward on the side where I always wanted it and the same basic size as the first one and as the one pictured except mine is extra tall by about 12" so that I can put any T in it with the top up including my 1912 Delivery Car which has no ability to put the top down. With the side door all the way forward I can get in and out to get tools or whatever without having to wiggle past the front fender of the T. I love my new trailer. Unlike the Haulmark which was poorly constructed - this one is constructed very nice and everything fits nicely to detail. I picked it up in Indiana and saved a fair amount that way. It is a "house brand" generic but built nice. Before you spend big bucks for the V-nose or sloped nose front end - get some actual data on gas mileage because I think the actual frontal area is determined by the width and height of the trailer and while the sloped front ends seem like they should help - they sure didn't help me and as little as I tow - I think the convenience of having more room in the front of the trailer that is usable is a better trade than a few hypothetical but not measurable gallons of gas saved. With my first trailer, I once followed my son and his T for 350 miles at speed of about 40 MPH and boy now THAT made a huge difference in mileage but I am sure it had more to do with the wind resistance and engine efficiency of the tow vehicle than anything. The tow vehicle is breaking the wind - the trailer is drafting the tow vehicle. Your mileage may vary - in this case - literally.

With regard to door opening - take a good look at how the trailer maker mounts the torsion bar mechanism since that can take away 2" if he mounts it the wrong way. I have seen trailers specified to have a certain door opening in the back but although the door itself has that opening - the clearance of the torsion bar mounting for the ramp door may reduce the usable opening size.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By leefrostpierce on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 02:07 am:

An 8 ft wide trailer makes it easer to get around the T Make sure the tires will clear the trailers tire wells on a 7 ft wide trailer You will like a trailer that you can leave the top up and a ramp that pulls down for loading plus a Vee nose Others have mentioned the same but I wanted to express my thoughts Lee


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 02:21 am:

My trailer is actually 2 ft. longer because of the V. It extends out over the tongue. The flat nose trailer does not. I've Never pulled the wedge style trailer but have pulled the flat nose and prefer the V. I don't have any wind tunnel test results but I'm happy with it. Just my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 09:32 am:

I just bought a new 20'X8 1/2 enclosed with extra ft. tall. Most trailers built with a ramp door, the door is only 6 1/2 ft. tall which isn't high enough for an older Model T with the top up.
The extra ft. doesn't cost that much extra and is well worth it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By M. C. Hawker on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 11:31 am:

When I bought a trailer for my C Cab TT I bought a 24 foot Haulmark with beavertail and, most importantly, an extra foot in height. That TT is one tall girl and just makes it!

The extra length allows for a front workbench and storage cabinets above and below. The side door clears the front bumper easily. I still have about 4 feet in front of the bumper up to the front storage cabinets.

The TT has a stake body which add appreciably to the width. It is rather difficult to squeeze around the bed even with the 8 1/2 foot trailer width, so I just duck down and crawl under it.

Gas mileage on my 06 F-150 up to the plant in PA was 16. Coming back with the empty trailer I got 9.3! Towing with my 9.3 mpg motorhome yields 9.0
! Of course, the motor home height blocks most of the wind so it streamlines very well.

My advice is to not pinch pennies on the trailer size. Get one specifically designed for car hauling and go for the extra height. With Ts you will definitely it. A couple extra feet in length will do wonders when working on the car in the trailer.

My trailer is transport, storage and workshop all in one.

Tony


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George...Cherry Hill, NJ on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 12:04 pm:

Robbie,

Perhaps not a part of your original question as I have always run with open flat trailers myself, but a point to add that others could comment on is the use of load stabilizers connected to the tow hitch itself.

We are always concious as to how much the trailer weight itself can rob from the Gross Weight rating of the trailer, and add to that the mystical elusive ratings of the tow vehicle itself, and in my case the trailer has always been general purpose and can haul stuff that takes it to the max.

But I have to say that I have definately noticed that 'load stabilzers' to the hitch assembly make a world of difference! Even with but a single T!

With them in place, a good hardy F-150 can handle the load of vehicle and trailer, there is absolutely NO sway and drift at any speed, and quite frankly, you don't even know there is a trailer behind you! This came home to light last week when the son and I had to haul a chassis.

Chassis only, eh? Why bother mounting the stabilizers right? Guess what? It behaved like a trailer and had to be driven totally different with constant watch in the rear views!

So, my suggestion would be to think also of stabilizers, they don't come cheap, but I can attest that they make a world of difference! Others may have other thoughts or comments.

Not trying to divert the thread, but I am now also to the point where there are times I will be needing to tote TWO T's...open trailer and of course I want the shortest possible. I can figure out the loads, ratings, brakes, and hitch assembly...but any thoughts as to how short I can go for 2 end to end or slightly nested?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 12:16 pm:

I would invest in a 1000 lb. capacity 12V battery powered winch to mount at the front of the trailer (with a long enough remote control to reach out the end of the trailer), with which to safely load and off-load your Model T. No matter the level of experience, there is always a high level of danger when attempting to drive a Model T onto a trailer. One must first apply enough power, to get it up the ramp, then once in the trailer, cut the throttle and apply both brakes in time to stop it before running through the front. I did it successful once, but sat there for five minutes rehersing the number of moves I would need to do in the correct order in order to acheive success. Also, you need to make sure that door is strong enough to support the weight of the Model T and that it has supports under the door so that the trailer does not drop down and yank the trailer hitch up off the hauling vehicle, or lift the vehicle up. There is nothing more unnerving than to feel yourself falling when the unsupported end of the trailer drops as you are attempting to drive the car up onto the trailer. If there are no built in end supports, wooden blocks stacked on top of eachother will work, but don't forget them. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 12:20 pm:

You may want to get a trailer that you can put the T in with the top up.

As many of us know, your top will stay in better condition if your car is stored with the top up and an enclosed trailer is an excellent place to store your T if you are short on garage space.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Georgetown Ontario Canada on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 12:30 pm:

Hi Robbie,

As already stated, I think it would be a good idea to get a trailer just a touch bigger - a foot wider and a foot taller. It will make your loading/unloading a lot easier. Lessens the chance of damaging your roof, etc while loading. I would give the manufacturer a call and ask what it would cost to upgrade to one size bigger - the cost won't be that much. They might even have one that is sitting in their shop/yard that someone ordered and backed out of the deal. I am also in agreement with George on the swaybar/stabilzer system for the trailer tongue - the difference is night and day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 01:39 pm:

M. C. Hawker - I sent you a PM.

Thanks, Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By willie k cordes on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 01:46 pm:

I will agree with George on the anti-sway and load stabilizers. If you are pulling an open trailer and everything is sized right, there is little need for the above items.
If you have an enclosed trailer, the cross winds and winds caused by large trucks move your trailer more than what you would expect. The anti-sway and load stabilizers make a lot of difference even if your tow vehicle is plenty large for the job.
I pull an 8' wide by 18' long trailer high enough to load any T and some TT's. The nose is slanted onto the tongue and also V onto the tongue. It cuts the wind real good, but a high wind or trucks are a problem without the above items.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Moorehead on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 06:19 pm:

So I guess this means you got your car!?
E-mail me and I will give you some folks here in Louisville I know of.

Tom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By M. C. Hawker on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 08:36 pm:

My middle grade (Thrifty series?) Haulmark has nice white finished interior paneling which really brightens up things. I also added a 32 watt florescent strip light midway on each side up at the top of the sidewalls and wired them up to a switch at the right of the front door using surface mount wiring. A weatherproof outdoor receptacle to the right of the side door allows me to power the trailer lights and receptacles below the interior lights. A small strip light under the overhead cabinets covers the front and the metal topped lower cabinet. Plenty of storage for tools, electric winch and portable generator.

Yep. The trailer cost me more than the TT, but I can work indoors during inclement weather, have heat and light and security.


A friend surprised me by delivering my TT on an open trailer and tore a hole in the roof. No real damage, just a patch dislodged, so that just reinforced my dislike of open hauling.

Sorry for the rant, but I thought a description of the last trailer I will ever need might be of some interest.

Tony


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel(Indiana Trucks)Star City In on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 09:36 pm:

One thing no one has said anything about that I have seen first hand about enclosed trailers with or without a car stored inside. I have seen a 24 foot enclosed with a car inside (1950 Chevy) show car that was blown over in the driveway by a storm and the car was smashed along with the trailer. Car has been rebuilt with a new roof and lots of hard work but trailer was trashed and even some damage was done to the house that kept it all in his yard. Now the car is done again and stored in the new trailer BUT he now has tie downs in the ground and hooks a cable to the trailer on all 4 corners to help keep it on the ground. Just something for everyone to think about to help protect all those nice T's which are not as heavy as a 1950's era car.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 09:59 pm:

I agree that anti-sway units and stabilizers are a very good investment for safe trailering but with a V nose trailer you may not be able to use the stabilizers as the trailer body often extends too far forward on the rails. I have a V nose trailer and had to order it with the rails extended by one foot in order to install stabilizers. Be sure to check this first if you plan to use the stabilizers. Another option if your tow vehicle has a roof rack is to install a deflector on the roof of the tow vehicle. You see them on the roof of truck tractors and they really do reduce drag on the trailer whether its a flat nose or V nose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Saturday, December 11, 2010 - 01:15 am:

Years ago, I stopped at a place here in town that sold Wells Cargo trailers. They had a small display deal with a miniature trailer inside a box (the trailer box was like about 8" long). At the time, Wells Cargo had a plastic bubble that could be mounted on the front of their flat-front trailer. This display showed the difference in force required to pull the trailer with and without the bubble in place. It had kind of a wind tunnel with a fan blowing air over the model. I don't remember the numbers but it was significant.

I have not proven this yet, but I think a shorter trailer...one that is just big enough to haul a T, is a little harder to pull than one which is larger. I'm thinking a 20' box would not be a bad idea.


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