Removing pedal shafts from the hogs head

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Removing pedal shafts from the hogs head
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Smith on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 12:11 am:

Evening everyone.
I have a 26-27 hogs head that I am rebuilding. I am down to the point where I need to remove the High/Low pedal and shaft and the clutch lever shaft. Problem is those rivits holding everything together. I have run out of ideas and ways to break those free. Most folks say to grind off the heads and just drive them out. As far as I can tell they might as well be welded in place. For all the work I have done, nothing has moved. I don't want to destroy any original parts, but there must be a right way to do this. Are there any secreats to this process???
Thanks

Paul
'25 Coupe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art Wilson on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 01:11 am:

Here's how I did mine.
Carefully center punch the center of the rivets. If the rivets are not visible after grinding them flush with the pedal, possibly heating the area with a torch will show the location. Start with an 1/8" bit and drill in from each end of the rivet to where you are into the shaft. Using an 1/8" bit makes it easier to keep it aligned and allows for some adjustment it the holes are off. Then progressively increase the bit size up to one that is slightly smaller than the rivet diameter and twist the pedal to shear off what is remaining of the rivet, or drill each hole almost to the center of the shaft and use a drift punch to drive the rivet out. This way you are not increasing the diameter of the hole in the pedal.
When putting it back together the inner cam on the clutch shaft can be assembled with a bolt and nut. It's easier that way and can be disassembled later for adding seals etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush, Portland Oregon on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 02:32 am:

I used a split pin then put a safety wire through it just to be sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush, Portland Oregon on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 02:33 am:

I mean rolled pin!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 07:16 am:

Paul,
I have a hard time locating the centre of a rivet to hit with a punch, so I go this route. Centre punch the rivet as near as you can and drill three quarters of the way through the rivet. If you got really close with the centre punch, you can go a little larger on the drill size, but don't start drilling the cam. This will weaken the rivet and using a pin punch in the hole you drilled, it is easy to pound the remaining rivet out without having to worry about keeping the punch properly located on the rivet end.

Whenever doing this job, especially on alloy hogsheads, it is wise to have somebody hold the cover over a heavy drift in a vice, so the cam is supported and your hammer blows will have maximum effect.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen, Ham Lake, MN on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 08:33 am:

To better locate the edges of the rivet, I've found that a few drops of Kroil in the area will usually make the hole/rivet border show up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Dupree on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 09:19 am:

If all else fails, drill through the center of the end of the shaft far enough to cut through the pin. Start with a small hole and keep increasing the size until the drill knocks the pin loose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John A Kuehn on Friday, December 10, 2010 - 11:08 am:

I had the same trouble getting the pin out of my low speed pedal. And also NO GO when simply grinding off the head of the pin and trying to drive the pin out. I finally heated the shaft up from the outside end of the pedal. In other words the exposed end of the flush end of the pedal. Then the pin finally started to move.
I had priviously center punched the pin to get a good location center to try to drive it out.
I believe that I should have heated up the the exposed flush end pedal shaft FIRST and let it cool then it would have come out much easier.
Thats what I intend to do if there ever is a next time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Smith on Saturday, December 11, 2010 - 12:24 am:

Thanks Guys
All great ideas. All these ideas make sense and even a few that I had pondered a time or two my self. A great place this forum. I appreciate all your thoughts and all of you taking time to answer with an idea.
Thanks again.

Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, CO on Saturday, December 11, 2010 - 03:46 am:

VERY IMPORTANT; Make sure you support with some heavy duty iron under the shaft, or you WILL BEND THE SHAFT. Use a hollow item that surrounds the bottom of the rivet. I will try to take a picture in the morning and show you. The guys are correct you may have to drill out part of the old rivet, but not always. When you support the shaft it should be under the Notch and surrounding the rivet. Other than the support the only other thing touching the bench should be the very FRONT of the hogs head.

Also when you put your O rings in the brackets make sure all three brackets are champered or you will destroy the O rings. They usually have enough champer but not always. NOTE the slow speed bracket is different than the brake and reverse, don't mix them. If you do mix them the low speed pedal will be locked up tight.

When you remove your controler shaft be sure to SUPPORT it also. The controler shaft is even more susceptible to bending than the low speed pedal.


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