Wood question: Difference between 14 and 15

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Wood question: Difference between 14 and 15
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 11:46 am:

Hi

Question, I was looking at body wood for a 1917 roadster, and was wondering if it could fit my Dad's 14. If so how much would I have to change?

I know I would definitely need to change the forward top and vertical rails on each side, but how do the sills differ? Any input is appreciated.

Thanks!
Richard


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leon Parker - Benton, Kentucky on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 12:17 pm:

Richard
The sills on the 1914 go straight to the cherry wood firewall. The 1915 has a sill extension on the front that goes inward to follow 1915 sheet metal. The 1914 sheet metal has only a slight angle. Both sills are the same in length. Leon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 12:39 pm:

Leon,

So, if you remove these "sill extensions" will that leave you with the appropriate sill to mate with the firewall?

Here is a link to the wood. http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1917-1922-Model-T-Roadster-Body-New-Wood-Kit-/190 478626836?pt=Salvage_Parts_Cars&hash=item2c59693014 Can this be made to fit my Dad's car? If so, how much work would need to be done?

Or I am I best off looking into a 14 wood kit?

Thanks
Richard


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 03:07 pm:

No, because all the sill extension does is takes the place of wood that was not factored into the sill. In other words, the sill extension is necessary to the length of the overall sill.

Where the extension is would actually be wooden on a 1914.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 07:04 pm:

It doesn't sound like this would would be helpful to him then.

Any other ideas?

Richard


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 05:19 pm:

My Dad always said "Be careful, if you cut something too long, there is nothing you can do about it. But if you cut something too short, you can always scab another piece on!"
I am not suggesting.
I just thought I would throw that out.
Maybe I should just throw that out.
Drive safe, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 05:47 pm:

Another idea is to purchase a wood kit from a trusted supplier, and a set of re-wooding plans from Mr Parker.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker - Sumter, SC on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 07:09 pm:

Richard,

For any wood kit for the earlier cars (i.e. low cowl roadster or touring) there will be quite a bit of fitting due to the different body makers who supplied the bodies and how they each did things a little different. See the Jun 26, 1915 letter at: http://mtfca.com/encyclo/doc15.htm .

For a little more money than e-bay item you can purchase a wood kit that is designed for a 1914 roadster see: http://fordwood.com/roadster1914.htm (note -- the last I heard they were taking a while to provide a kit so you may want to check with other suppliers as well as the vendors who stock wood kits). Note the body wood kit does NOT include the door wood -- so factor that cost in also. Note the front door wood is also different on the 1914 vs the 1915-1925 cars.

Leon's plans are a great asset for making your own wood or assembling wood provided by someone else.

Very Respectfully,

Hap 1915 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leon Parker - Benton, Kentucky on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 04:39 pm:

Richard
That link you have to e-bay for a wood kit is for a low cowl 1923. The metal he has to go with it is for a 1915-22 style roadster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard on Sunday, December 19, 2010 - 11:47 pm:

Thank you all for your input. It was an idea... but it isn't a very good one so we will be avoiding it. Instead we turned our attention to my 15 for a few days. In trying to bolt down the engine we hat a terrible time getting the two rear ears to line up, after a good while of looking, it turns out that years ago when one of the spring leafs was changed, the spring perch was mounted about 7/8" off center.

With that fixed, everything fits perfectly. That might even explain the broken front main I posted about months ago. I tried to install the new main today to only find that the mating surfaces where it bolts on do not reach the lower surface. Should there be spacers here or may there be a problem with the way the motor was set in by the last owner?

Thanks
Richard


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