New to me 1915 T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: New to me 1915 T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Wilkins on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 03:52 pm:

I recently came in possession of a 1915 T. My question is the p/o was trying to install a starter generator do they work? Also how can you check the magnets for strength in the car? I think i want to go back original. The car has been in a shed for close to 30 years. starter /gen1915 T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 04:44 pm:

Well, the installation is ugly. But it looks like a vintage unit and could be interesting. It may have originally been from a non-Ford automobile. I would have some concerns about the fan belt being able to start the engine reliably. But I know it was tried that way on some accessory units.
It looks like a nice car. Congratulations! Enjoy!
And drive carefully, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Wilkins on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 04:56 pm:

Yes, Ugly . That is why i want to go back to coils or distributor but unsure about the mag. Thanks Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 05:49 pm:

I can't offer any advice on the starter/generator deal, but that's fine looking ride!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Orlando Ortega Jr., Portales, New Mexico on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 06:30 pm:

Bill,

I also can't offer much advice but do want to offer you a warm welcome to the forum. Congratulations on your new Runabout.

We have lots of good folks here with much expertise. Be patient, you'll get advice in just a few moments.

Orlando


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 06:59 pm:

Interesting period accessory; I'd keep it if it was mine.
As for testing magnets in the car, easiest way is to poke a screwdriver down the magneto post hole and see how well it sticks to the magnets.
A more scientific way is to measure the magneto voltage with a light bulb load. However, this won't show up strong magnets if the field coils are faulty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Wotherspoon on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 07:16 pm:

Looks like a 1920's Dodge (East West) starter generator to me.
A friend of my father uses them in his 7.25" trains. They look light enough, until you have to carry it from one end of a swap meet to the other. At that point you are looking for the first bin to off load it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker - Sumter, SC on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 08:41 pm:

Bill,

Welcome aboard to a fun hobby. There are lots of Model T folks in Oregon. I would recommend you check the listing at: http://mtfca.com/clubpages/chapters.htm and http://mtfca.com/MTclubs.htm and see which groups are closest to you. And sometimes they will be in the state next door if you are close to a border.

If the previous owner is still available you can sometime just ask them and they will gladly give you some additional details. Or if they are no longer available or if they do not want to be bothered if you post some additional photos and/or have one of the local T folks look at your car they may be able to give you some good advice. Based on the single photo – it looks like the spark plug wires have been removed and a few other wires are lose. From that view, I don’t see anything that would indicate the previous owner installed a distributor or anything similar. It also looks like the car has been “well loved” so I would give it a 50/50 chance based on how nice the car looks that it was running and could easily be made to run again. Hook up the wiring correctly. [BIG CAUTION: DO NOT APPLY BATTERY POWERE TO THE MAGNETO POST – IT WILL KILL THE MAGNETO] Again if you wire it up correctly and if the switch is working properly the batter voltage will never go to the magneto post. If in doubt check twice and get a second opinion before applying or hooking up any electrical power.

See “Taking a Model T Ford out of Mothballs” by Milt Webb at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/8538.html and scroll down to Tom Mullin’s posting the third posting from the top.

Again from the single photo it appears that it has some parts from later years. That is common with Ts and for a good driver the later 1926-27 wire wheels that you have on your car actually make the car ride nicer (less hard) and make it tremendously easier to change a flat than the original style non-demountable wheels that came on a 1915 car. If you would like additional information on any other items from various years just let folks know and they can help you identify them --- but the cars are just as much fun to drive with parts from all of one year or from several different years.

And when you have a chance please take a look at the thread posting “Home for the Holidays” at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/40322.html which points out where to locate the body number and the letter that normally indicates which of the several body manufactures produced your body for Ford. Ford even made some of them but many were produced by outside suppliers. I’m fairly certain you will find the body number on the right front floor board riser, if it is still there. Sometimes the tags are removed and sometimes the numbers are painted over etc. You can post what you find here or click on my name at the beginning of this or any other posting I make and my e-mail address is the third line down.

Again welcome aboard – if your car runs half as good as it looks – it should be very easy to get it running again. A little help over the weekend and you might even have it running before Christmas. Another caution: Model Ts tend to leak gasoline. If you have a gas fired hot water heater or similar source for a spark in the same area your T is located – be very very careful. Several homes have been lost when the car leaked, the dishwasher was turned on, and then the hot water heater clicked on. In my own garage – I have replaced gas hot water heaters before with electric ones to lower the risk. And I just found out this month, that they have been producing gas and propane hot water heaters that will shut off if they detect gasoline fumes. But I don’t think I would want to risk it – even with one of those styles.

I’ll try to locate a wiring diagram and other information and post later. Again, welcome to a fun hobby and a great group of guys and gals.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker - Sumter, SC on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 10:01 pm:

Bill,

Before I forget, be sure the car has antifreeze protection or drain the radiator when in doubt. Also, let us know if this is your first T or if you are at least a little familiar with them or not. Your previous posting http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/170297.html?1289528062#POST284066 indicates you have inherited the car along with a 1914 basket case and other parts from your Father-in-law. If he is no longer with us, perhaps his wife or other relative may be able to shed some light the status of the car. I know my Mom knew which Fords my Dad had that would run and which ones were not going to start anytime soon.

Below is a photo that Robb Wolff posted back in Nov 2006, but I cannot find a link to the original posting.



You can also find out a lot about your car at: http://mtfca.com/books/21manual.htm a 1921 owner’s manual – but similar items in some cases. Wiring is discussed above question number 53 and 119 See also illustration number 5 at: http://mtfca.com/books/Course.htm

If you have a compass, you can check to see if the magnets are in the car without having to remove the inspection plate etc. If you lift up the top two floor boards you will see the transmission cover similar to the one shown below – this is taken from the passenger door area looking towards the transmission [used by permission to help promote our hobby from page 226 of Bruce's book but also in his Comprehensive Model T Encyclopedia -- which I highly recommend you purchase as it contains a lot about your car as well as having the "Ford Service Book" that explains how to work on the car. Available from the vendors or direct from Bruce at: http://mtfca.com/encyclo/mccalley.htm ]



The wire is attached to the magneto post. And you want to place the compass one inch in front and one and one/half inches to the left or right of the magneto post as shown below:



If you have someone turn the engine over slowly with the crank (be sure it won’t start i.e. leave the wires off the plugs). When the needle reads north is towards the front of the car on the right side (passenger side) if you move the compass without moving the flywheel the compass should now point north towards the rear of the car. That is because it should be over the magnet below it. If you turn the engine over slowly you should see the compass swing from north to south each time one of the ends of the magnet moves below the compass. If the compass doesn’t move at all then probably the compass or the magnets are not working properly. Note somethime folks remove the magnets to lighten the fly wheel. But often when that is done you will see a distributor added to the engine.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 10:51 pm:

Yep, Dodge Bro's starter, sometime after '17. I can see the threaded nose typical of the DB starter/generator, and the stepped back brush area of the later style.
While somewhat period, not really a "period accessory" more of a creative creation.
Neat car!
T
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, December 13, 2010 - 10:53 pm:

Whether or not you use that starter/generator you should keep it. It is a period accessory, and an interesting item.
Norm


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