Engine color for 1912

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Engine color for 1912
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Dwyer on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 12:40 pm:

Hi all --

Getting to the point of thinking about what color to paint the 1912 engine. I'm sure this has been talked to death, but specifically for the early cars, is there any consensus on what came out of the factory?

For my taste, either flat black or a dark gunmetal grey seems appropriate.

Thanks --- Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 08:06 pm:

The block and head, and all the parts attached thereto, appear to have been unpainted in 1912. The engine pan was painted black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve McClelland on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 11:05 pm:

I used re-buliders cast blast cast iron spray paint in a spray can on mine with black lower pan, it looks pretty good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin, Branch/Lafayette, LA on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 11:19 pm:

Royce, would Ford have put some sort of protective coating on it? Maybe an oil or something?

I wonder if there is a high temp clearcoat available that would work on our engines?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 11:40 pm:

I've seen hi-temp clear in the paint store, but I've never used it so I don't know if it will yellow with age like some clears do when exposed to heat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin, Branch/Lafayette, LA on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 11:42 pm:

Hey this might work.
http://www.caswellplating.com/vht/vhtclear.htm

From my experience the stuff that takes 1,000 degrees to cure holds up real well normally if you do the right prep work. They may have this on the shelf at autozone? There are 500 degree and 1,000 degree paints. Try not to use the 500 degree stuff because it tends to spidercrack after a year or two (especially if you drive through water when the part is hot). If you were to scrub off as much rust as possible, even sandblast, let it flash rust then brillo pad it off so it darkens then coat with this it may look real nice :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin, Branch/Lafayette, LA on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 11:44 pm:

An electric heat gun from Harbor Freight is a good investment for curing this IMHO


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 01:48 am:

I know AutoZone or as I call it "Ozone" since most employees are in the Ozone at my local store, carries Dupli-color hi-temp paint. I painted a set of Model A brake drums with it and they still look good after 8 years & 50K miles, mostly stop & go get the brakes hot type driving.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 06:42 am:

Ford did not have time to put any protective coating on anything. The engine leaked enough oil to keep it from rusting until it was sold by the dealer. You need to remember, cars were not expected to be useful longer than a few years. Ford did not build 1912 Model T's with the idea that they would exist 98 years later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin, Branch/Lafayette, LA on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 06:59 am:

Did Ford paint the later engines? You know that cast blast stuff I put on mine really doesn't look that great :-/ I might do as you described and strip the paint then go over with the clearcoat. That is if Ford didn't paint the later cars engines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck - Shreveport, LA on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 08:43 am:

Ford painted the improved car engines - a somewhat olive green, not the same color as model A engine green.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 10:23 am:

For whatever it is worth.
Step 84 of the engine assembly process outlined in Ford Methods and Ford Shops (1914 production) clearly states "Paint motor-remove from line" Unfortunately it does not elaborate upon the paint used.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nicholas Lingg on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 10:48 am:

"Black is the absence of color" So is Black the right color?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 11:53 am:

These cars were being assembled at a fair in San Francisco. 1915. The engine in the foreground left is painted, compare it to the pile of axles.

The alum hogshead can be seen unpainted, but that inspection cover plate is black painted too.



Painted starter equipped engine on assembly line



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 12:21 pm:

What is the engine next to the pile of rear ends sitting in? Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 12:27 pm:

Dan

Would be some kind of staged assembly rack or something to hold the finished engines while the 'production line' was underway at the fair.

The specific factory overhead or chain hoist lines couldn't be used in that exhibition hall, so the Ford guys came up with someway to deliver and hoist the engines to the chassis.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 02:17 pm:

Looks like a big electric motor behind the engine. Is it one of the burn in machines that Ford did not use? Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 06:55 pm:

Dan,
These photos at the 1915 Fair in San Francisco are great!
Do you have any more?,if so can you share them with us.Some Towncars were produced at the Fair ,but we have never seen one at the Fair.The 1915 Towncar in Holland is one of them.
-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 - 10:45 pm:

Don

That's the only picture in the article. From 1916 Fordowner magazine.



Dan, maybe so, that stand could be a display showing how the factory 'ran-in' each engine prior to QA acceptance, the public would have liked to see that method of testing, as other mfg in the low cost field sure did not do such factory tests prior to shipping a car :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary griffin on Monday, December 20, 2010 - 07:11 pm:

Guys,
Wasn't there an article from Trent Bogges on engine paint several years ago?
If memory serves, (which is dubious at beast!) Trent found conclusive documentation on all engine blocks being "painted" before they left the factory. The early "T"'s, 1909 through 1913, were painted with a product called Gleasonite.
Trent also found the documentation on the ingredients and the cost of the process.
The Gleasonite probably did not last very long. However I have seen several early blocks that were very greasy and when cleaned, there were remnants of black paint.
Gary Griffin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen, Ham Lake, MN on Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 10:17 am:

Gary, it's Gilsonite. No biggy, I have a similar memory problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 12:25 pm:

Clear coat even high temp will yellow over time, unfortunately it aint been invented yet to keep the cast iron in its original form, thats what a few paint guys tell me !!!!

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez on Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 03:45 pm:

Dave and Gary, was that also the "black slush" used for painting some parts? The reason I ask is that we had a family friend who grew up in the teens and 20's as a real car nut. He told me the engine paint appeared very thin and runny when applied and had very little gloss. He refereed to it as Black slush paint.???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 04:00 pm:

Gilsonite is in driveway coatings and dare I say it......... tar! Not sure if there's any Gilsonite in the modified bitumen type however.

I bought some driveway coat at Ace Hardware a couple years back that had Gilsonite in it.

Here's a bit more about it. It was used on Model A Parts as well, so I've done a little bit of reading on the subject.

http://zieglerchemical.com/gilsonit.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary griffin on Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 09:35 pm:

Never could spell worth a damn!
Gary


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