Amish Ingenuity

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Amish Ingenuity
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Puckey, Chagrin Falls, OH on Thursday, December 16, 2010 - 01:44 pm:

This is a little off subject buy it kinda fits into the T era. After a pretty good snow storm last Tuesday everybody was out clearing drives. This guy did it with two Belgians (2 HP) and a makeshift plow arrangement. My brother took the photo on his way home from work.Amish snowplow


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Thursday, December 16, 2010 - 01:57 pm:

the mother of invention. you know there are times that, that simpler life would be welcome. Back to the basic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Shelton on Thursday, December 16, 2010 - 02:29 pm:

Forecart without a 3-point hitch lift. They make these with a 3-point hitch and even some with a small motor to run a hydraulic pump for it.

Nice loking team!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, December 16, 2010 - 11:29 pm:

It's been 50 years since i seen it but my Grandad had a A frame built with two 14 16" logs with planks spiked to the logs he stood on to drive Bess and Bell. Must have worked well because i nevver had to shovle his driveway! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen, Ham Lake, MN on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 08:55 am:

Bud, sounds like the outfit my dad used before we got rid of the horses in '58. As a "young feller", he used it to open the road South of their farm that led to the States Inn, a roadhouse that was popular with the '20s era college crowds that would come up from Minneapolis to Fridley. Dad worked as a dishwasher there on evenings after milking was done. $.05 and hour and he got to take the garbage home for the hogs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Brown on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 09:45 am:

road machine
I'm surprised they hadn't found one of the many old horse drawn road machines like this one. They came in various sizes. Larger ones were pulled by tractors and trucks. This one, a two horse (or more) was widely used in the early part of the 20th century for road building and road maintenance. Notice the large wheels on top used for angling the blade and for angling the rear wheels inorder to make it track straighter. When the blade started cutting hard, the grader wanted to track sideways and needed correction. It did a good job with an experienced operator.
In 1905, the local town here in western NC bought a road grading machine for 225.00 and had it shipped in on a train from Chicago. A mechanic came along with it to set it up and make sure it operated correctly. They used the machine to grade out the first streets in town. Before that, they were just horse and wagon paths that followed the lay of the land.
Maybe i need to go back and see if i can buy that machine. It makes a lousy flower planter anyway.
Roger


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Brown on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 10:07 am:

Here is a pic of a larger road machine. This one would have to be pulled by a heavy truck or heavy tractor. This one was commonly seen being pulled by a heavy dump truck.The owner is a collector of old road machines and old tractors.
road machine
Roger


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 10:08 am:

Roger,There is one about 5 miles north of me that has sat along the road for sale many years!! I would guess those graders are so handy the Amish cant afford them?? As i think back 50 years we had our Boyscout meetings at The Lee Township Hall and it was full of then 50 year old advertizements for Steam Engines and Road Graders!! The hall was heated with a smsll wood stove so im sad to say what happned to all that then junk paper!! Hindsight is 20 20! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Brown on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 10:33 am:

bad roads
The horse did not give up easily to the automobile. Although the Model T was a worthy opponent.
This scene was not uncommon to see in many parts of the country well into the 40's and 50's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 11:00 am:

Aren't those mules? :-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 11:30 am:

Here's my 1880's Austin - have the correct front wheels on it now. I'm a retired Heavy Equipment Operator - not old enough to operate this one though !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 12:44 pm:

I wasn't aware the Amish were allowed to use rubber tires.

A few old period photographs.


A cab would be nice for cold weather.

A couple of big fellas wearing a little extra traction on their shoes.

These shoes were equipped with large steel cleats. If I remember correctly, my Dad called them corks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 01:30 pm:

Look again, the grader with the cab has a three horse team.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 01:45 pm:

What kind of horses are in the 3rd pic down in John's post?

They're huge! Granted my knowledge of horses is bascially nil, so this may be a stupid question.

I grew up working the land, but it was a citrus grove not an actual farm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Georgetown Ontario Canada on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 02:17 pm:

Watching two Belgian horses working never gets old for me....the pictures in this thread are great! My hats off to all these guys who still show/use them - there is a ton of work that has to be done before getting the horses hooked up, as well as getting them back in the barn for the night...........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dolo F, South Texas on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 02:49 pm:

Such beautiful, awsome animals. Reminds you how big an asset a powerful horse was before the machines took over, no wonder horse stealing was a hanging offence.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 03:20 pm:

This is a great thread! Greg's comments make me think of the guys 100 years ago. As much as we think, by todays standards, what a lot of effort goes into getting our old Fords started and the comparatively slow speeds we get, to those guys it was a snap in contrast to using a team.

My grandfather used a team of mules to work his orchard and vinyard until 1946. That year he moved to a new ranch (all orchard) that came with a Caterpillar Two Ton. He thought he was in heaven. All he had to do was give it a coule of pulls on the crank and he was working. At the end of the day, just park it, shut it off, and it would wait until you needed it again with no attention whatsoever.

Sometimes my kids complain that our '18 TT is "too slow". I remind them that when it was new, folks were afraid of such speed. I guess it'a all relative.

But you're right. There's little as handsome as a matched team! I


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 04:31 pm:

We had an Adams Leaning Wheel Grader that was used for many years on the ranch. We pulled it with an International TD 6 tractor. It was not quite as large as the large one above. We used it to construct and maintain a 2700' road from the Hiway and several other roads on the ranch. We also used it to build and maintain a 2000' runway. I based my last Mooney Super 21 there.

The rear wheels could be leaned to counteract the forces of rolling the dirt left or right. The blade could be swung left or right to be able to grade outside the wheel track. The blade could be lowered or raised each side independent of the other to allow for the road crown and making gutters


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 04:48 pm:

Example of leaning wheels that Jim Weir speaks of.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 04:58 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Puckey, Chagrin Falls, OH on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 05:01 pm:

Luke, I think the team you are asking about are Percherons. They are truly beautiful animals.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 05:54 pm:

Look in John Berch's post above with the 4 pictures. On the 3rd one down did you see the car in the backround on the far right side? It looks to me like a '26 - '27 T Roadster.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 07:39 pm:

Fordsons also go into the act with third parties using them as in these ones:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 08:08 pm:

Here are a couple of shots of a restored Fordson Grader. There are enough gadgets on board to keep a guy busy!






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 08:29 pm:

The snowplow on the front of the Fordson looks very advanced for the time! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 08:53 pm:

Notice in the last picture how they set it up to hand crank from the side or possibly belt to some sort of motor to start the tractor. All of the controls to the carb. would be on the same side as the crank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 09:20 pm:

Many years ago in Texas, and I assume many other states, a person could pay off their yearly county taxes by working time on a road crew for the many miles of unpaved roads in rural areas. My wife's Grandfather spent 7-10 days every year in Grimes County, Texas using his own mules to pull a small grader rig like those shown in the pictures posted above to pay his tax. He was allowed to work in groups with other local farmers on the roads close to their farms so that it was fairly easy to go home every night.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Edward J. Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 10:13 pm:

Even more thread drift. Last place I worked had a 1953 Cat C-112 grader. Pony started the diesel, handshaker controls. Most fun I ever had at work. Period.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Schaller on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 10:44 pm:

I know in 1930, my Grandfather horse plowed a path across the local lake and fields to the county road to allow my Grandmother, riding in a heated car, to make it to the hospital so my Mother could be born. To visit them in the hospital, he would cross country ski 2 miles to the nearest train crossing, and hitch the train to town. Times have changed. Not a lot of fat guys in his generation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 10:55 pm:

My Grandfather and the boys worked with their teams and board scrapers to help build M-20 in Mi.The youngest of the boys my Dad was born in 1906. Ditches were dug on the farms with the same scrapers and tile were dug by hand.They also had a threashing machine and two model TT trucks! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 11:13 pm:

When I was a small kid in Wisconsin farmers used a King Grader to fill in the ruts of their farm roads and driveways.
It had two adjustable blades and the operator stood on it as he drove the horses that pulled it.
They had boxes on them where you could load them up with rocks to help make the grader more effective.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 11:35 pm:

Here in Iowa we also would drag some of our own roads as Micheal and Aaron mentioned. It was just certain county roads, paths etc.. That's the way many people worked off their Poll Tax. Many country people would drag a certain section of road then pass the drag on to the next farmer down the road.

I have a section of one of these old drags and they do work very well.





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 12:12 am:

John,

That's a fine collection of photos you have!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 12:40 am:

Thanks Luke but they are not mine. I've offered the link several times on the forum. They are actually from a D.O.T. web site. There's over 8000 photo's there. Some are a little tedious but definitely worth searching through. I would encourage everybody that likes old transportation photo's to check them out and search your own state D.O.T. for "Historic Photo's". Here's the link. Hope you'll check it out and enjoy it.

http://historicalphotos.iowadot.gov/Main.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 12:51 am:

Luke, Try this.

http://historicalphotos.iowadot.gov/HistoricalPhotos_home.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 01:08 am:

Luke the IHC section on the second link are probably the best.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson (Aust) on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 03:00 pm:


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