Period Photo - Loading Dirt.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Period Photo - Loading Dirt.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 06:52 pm:

At first glance it makes you wonder how could a man slide that much dirt up a wooden ramp in one pass.



Here's what's happening on the other side of the truck.



If you look closely you'll see a steel ring with a cable clamp at the leading edge of the slip. There is a cable hooked to the ring but it is very hard to see. It goes over the end of the wooden shoot and is hooked to the horses on the other side of the truck




Notice the cable hooked to the chain on the horse drawn slip.




I would assume between loads the horse drawn slip operator would pull the pin, unhook from the cable and go back around and scrape some more dirt loose for the stock pile.

Seems like a lot of work but it would sure beat the alternative of scooping it on by hand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 07:02 pm:

I took a load of shelled corn in an enclosed semi trailer in the 60's to a chicken farm in northern Georgia and they unloaded the corn that way only they used a CJ5 Jeep.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White, Sheridan, MI on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 07:23 pm:

When I was a wee lad I remember my dad using this method to dig out a basement under our house. They used a car or a doodle bug. This was about 1941 or 42.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 07:30 pm:

Thanks John, that sure beats the shovel :-)
It is fascinating studying the old pictures to see just how they were doing what they were doing.
Cheers
Adrian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Brown on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 07:37 pm:

I never cease to be amazed at the ingenuity of our forefathers. Who was it that said that "Necessity is the mother of invention". I remember my grandfather (1898-1974) was always a innovator. He told me many times to "work smart, not hard". He had all kinds of innovations around the farm to make life easier. Like the first electric lights in the community made from a car generator, designed, patented, and produced a well pump. He also rigged a sort of early day fork lift for the rear of his tractor to raise hay up to the top of hay stacks and the list goes on and on. I guess he was not too different from other folks of the day, in that if you needed something, you built it.
Roger


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Harold - Noblesville, IN on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 08:25 pm:

We dug a root cellar on my farm using a slip scoop in the mid '70s. I pulled it with my Allis-Chalmers WC tractor. The job went fairly quickly. Had it done in an afternoon.

In the late '30s I watched a fellow with a team dig a basement for a house in one day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 08:31 pm:

When I was a kid, a guy who worked for my dad, told me "Always use your head instead of your hands and feet. I makes life a lot easier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 11:29 pm:

That appears to be a WW1 liberty truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerald Cornelius on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 11:46 pm:

Speaking of innovation, my father was always tinkering and building new things. He built what I think was one of the first rotary lawnmowerws back in about 1948. He made a square wooden platform of plywood and 2/2"'s and mounted a saw mandrel vertcally in the front bolted to a homemade blade underneath. It was powered by a belt from a 2 cylinder maytag washing machine engine. He used 4 wagon wheels and a push handle made of water pipes. The only safety feature was a piece of old binder belt nailed to the rear.
It was a great improvement for me for mowing our 1/4 acre lawn with a reel mower. However, it could pick up rocks and throw them afar! (OSHA?)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 08:40 pm:

"Necessity is the mother of invention"

Meaning:

Difficult situations inspire ingenious solutions.

Origin:

The author of this proverbial saying isn't known. It is sometimes ascribed to Plato, although no version of it can be found in his works. It was known in England, although at that point in Latin rather than English, by the 16th century. William Horman, the headmaster of Winchester and Eton, included the Latin form 'Mater artium necessitas' in Vulgaria, a book aphorisms for the boys of the schools to learn by heart, which he published in 1519.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - Lyons, GA on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 08:56 pm:

Mack,

Where's that picture of your TT dump and the steam shovel?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Hughes, Raymond, NE on Sunday, December 19, 2010 - 12:08 am:

My father added to that old saying. He said "If necessity is the Mother of invention then laziness is the Father.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers-Greenville Pa. on Sunday, December 19, 2010 - 09:16 am:

Notice in the closeup the man on the ramp does not have his thumb around the handle of the slip.
I remember our old school bus driver never put his thumb around the steering wheel.
I wonder if it is all from habit based on cranking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel(Indiana Trucks)Star City In on Sunday, December 19, 2010 - 11:12 pm:

Truck could be a Liberty but has anyone noticed the the lift for the dump bed behind the cab?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A.J. "Art" Bell on Sunday, December 19, 2010 - 11:34 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel(Indiana Trucks)Star City In on Sunday, December 19, 2010 - 11:54 pm:

Thanks Art.

While you are at it, could you maybe walk around in front of the truck now and take a picture of the emblem on the radiator?

Thanks in advance
Bob :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A.J. "Art" Bell on Monday, December 20, 2010 - 12:07 am:

I did that Bob and although the rest of the truck was nearly pristine, the emblem was missing. <g>

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Monday, December 20, 2010 - 10:25 am:

Here's a few more pictures. The truck is a Federal.







Federal logo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Byrne - Racine MN on Monday, December 20, 2010 - 10:31 am:

That's a great set of construction photos. . thanks for posting them!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel(Indiana Trucks)Star City In on Monday, December 20, 2010 - 10:19 pm:

John,
Thanks for getting back in your time machine and getting us more pictures. I guess Art just looked in the wrong place for the emblem. <g>

Please post more of these old trucks and things if you have time because they are very interesting to most of us because it not only shows old cars and trucks but gives little snips of everyday life back in the days of the model T.


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