Cleaning rust from tanks

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Cleaning rust from tanks
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Brown on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 02:51 am:

Reading in an old VF in tinkering tips and it btold on removing shellac from gas tanks with a paint thinner and putting rocks in then rolling it around
We have used nuts (threaded ) dropped in a tank and shaken around and it worked great to remove rust and debris. Also if there is any lip insidethe filler hole you can always try to center the remaining nuts in the bottom and retrieve them with a long magnet.
Sure miss the tinkering tips.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 11:48 am:

First, remove the sediment fuel valve and replace it with a brass plug. This brass plug will need to be removed each time the solutions are emptied out and screwed back in the outlet before the next solution is poured in.

I first cleaned the old gasoline sludge, varnish and deposits out of the bottom with a gallon of MEK, which I let sit for several days, sloshing it around to clean the entirwe interior. You will be surprised at what comes out when this step is complete.

Upon pouring out the black sludge, I saw where there was rust in the tank, so I made up a solution of 1 gallon of muriatic acid and 5 gallons of water and let it sit for several days, sloshing it around several times a day. Upon pouring the black solution of dissolved rust out, the tank was clean as a whistle.

I then mixed a 5 gallon pail of water with several handfuls of baking soda mixed in and poured that in and sloshed it around to neutralize the acid. Leave it in until it stops bubbling (a couple of minutes. Then rinse with water.

After I emptied it of all the water, I poured in a bottle of POR 15 "Metal Ready", Metal Prep and sloshed it around several times for 30 minutes to prepare the interior for the POR-15. After emptying it of the "Metal Ready" (back in the bottle for re-use). I rinsed out the tank with water once again and then quick dried it using a Milwaukee high heat gun all around the exterior to evaporate the water and moisture left inside. Heat the tank until it is too hot to touch, but not so hot as to warp it so the moisture is completely out.

After it cools, pour in a quart of POR 15 Fuel Tank Sealant and slosh all around, up and down, until the entire tank interior is coated. When you are sure the entire interior is coated, remove the brass plug tilt the tank and let the remainder run out the threaded outlet back into the can for re-use. Make sure you do not allow the POR-15 Fuel Tank Sealant to harden in the threads as it is dries very hard and is very difficult to remove from the threads. Allow a week to dry before using. Jim Patrick. www.POR15.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 02:52 pm:

I use Acetone to cut the old shellac. After draining I then pour in a quart of phosphoric acid and a hand full of sheetrock screws and slosh for about 5 min. to remove rust. The little points really scour the tank. After washing with water and drying, I then coat the tank with Phenol Novolac from Caswell Plating. (caswellplating.com). Far better results than the POR15 in my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Stitt Oregon on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 03:05 pm:

I have used Rusteco on cast iron gumball machines. It works very well. They have a tank cleaner as well. I like Jim's method but for those that are simple minded like me here is a link,
http://www.rusteco.com/

I used to work around airplane mechanics and they had great stuff, just cost as much as a gas tank..!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Conner - Sanford, NC on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 03:15 pm:

One method I used a couple years ago on a very rusty fuel tank was to plug the drain and put in a couple handfuls of fine sand. Then I took my air nozzle and blew it into the tank at a 45 degree angle letting the sand swirl around. Then I just used my shop vac to get all the old sand out and rinsed it with solvent to get anything I might have missed. It worked fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 03:21 pm:

Robert, I have found it is very difficult to get all the sand out... the reason sheet rock screws are the abrasive of my choice (and recommended by Caswell) is, they are sharper than gravel or sand and one can count them going in and coming out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Utphall on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 05:46 pm:

Not an option of course if you're restoring an "improved Ford" but for me with my 25 touring, the best money I spent was on a new gas tank- just happen chance- the old one had a loose baffle and it was cheaper to buy a new one than to cut the old one open and re-attach the baffle.

I suppose some day an enterprising person will begin making tanks for the 26 and 27's as well


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Conner - Sanford, NC on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 08:13 pm:

John, I'd never thought of sheet rock screws. I'll have to try it next time I need to clean a tank. I know it's next to impossible to get all the sand out, that's why I rinse the tank pretty thoroughly. I trust it to get 99% of it out, the rest gets run through the sediment bowl, it had a glass one, so I knew if I got it all or not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brian clark-Hamilton, Ohio on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 09:12 pm:

For $75 I had mine professionally boiled out.
It wasn't line originally, so I didn't line it after that. Why add a chemical liner that could fail and cause problems later on?

If I had it to do over again, I would simply buy a new tank. I didn't realize it was only another $50 or so.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - Lyons, GA on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 09:31 pm:

I like those little filters made of fine screen wire that go into the inlet of the sediment bowl. I may be wrong, but I'll bet anything that would make it through the filter would make it through the carb with no ill effects. Since the filters are about 1-1/2" tall, you could have a whole lot of sediment in the bottom of a tank before it would interupt the fuel flow from the tank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Hughes, Raymond, NE on Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 11:59 pm:

Jim,

Sounds like a very thorough cleaning, but what do you do with all of the waste product? Do you have an environmentally friendly way of getting rid of all of that stuff?


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