Very very temporary spoke fix. Whadayou's think

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Very very temporary spoke fix. Whadayou's think
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 04:36 pm:

I have my 12 spokes, which I have primed today with Sherwin Williams A-100 exterior primer. When they are dry, I will be hand painting them with Sherwin Williams super gloss black, oil based enamel. I have the fun projects spoke press all made and will be installing the spokes after Christmas.

Tomorrow is our Christmas party at work. My Model T is here at work and I wanted to park it at the company Christmas party for everyone to see. Only problem is, the spokes are very dry rotted and loose so that you can hear them click as the wheel turns and the rim moves independent of the spokes about 1/16" in each direction, to and fro when shaken by hand. probably as bad as it can get before total collapse. I consider myself verrrry luck that I discovered it before it shattered (due to fine brown powder on the rim, all around each spoke).

I have the car parked in the warehouse, undercover until the spokes are done on that front passenger side wheel, but I really would like to drive it over to the Main Office and park it for the Christmas party tomorrow. If I drove 10d nails into the end of each spoke tenon, do you think that would provide enough strength for this one move or is it worth the risk? Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 04:40 pm:

How far do you have to drive it? Is it all on company property or will you be on public roads?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joncrane on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 04:41 pm:

TRAILER IT


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - Lyons, GA on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 04:52 pm:

If it's just across the parking lot, I would not be afraid to drive it slowly. Again, if it's not far, you and a couple of other guys could push it, if you're not comfortable driving it. Ultimately, it is your call, but If it weren't far, I know what I would do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 04:52 pm:

Don't risk it if you have looked at them that close, and now have second thoughts (and second opinion requests too ).

Spokes at the felloe need to be firm, and at the hub too.

These look like tack or nail in the spoke end, but not, just the centering turning nub.



This style with the dome metal cup is a bit different, but you can still check by rubber mallet bumping.



Pretty clear to not roll a T very far on this wheel :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 05:23 pm:

Jim,

For the short distance you have to go.
Instead of nails I would use a washer and some big wood screws. Put the washer on the screw and screw it into the end of the tendon. You may only have to do the worst spokes.I had an old timer about 30 yrs ago said that's what he did and it worked OK as a temporary fix.

Good luck.

Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By willie k cordes on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 05:26 pm:

What is the worst think that could happen if you are driving 5 MPH on the company parking lot. The wheel collapsed and you had to winch it on your trailer to get it back to its storage spot???????????????
You might not impress your fellow workers but no real harm was done at a very slow speed.
I have heard cars on tours come creaking across the parking lot. I usually try to politely tell the drivers that those wheels will collapse if they keep driving with those loose spokes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 06:21 pm:

It would be driven no further than 50 feet to the office and 50 feet back when the party is over. Sure would make a lot of people happy to see the old girl. Especially one of our very young 16 year old workers, Cody Corpin (working during his school holiday). He saw it when I drove it to work last week. He had never seen a Model T and yelled across the rail yard "I'M IN LOVE!!!" He could be a future T party member. I'd like to show him how they used to have to start em up. From the front. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 06:55 pm:

100 feet; drive it, if you are not crossing any railroad tracks. Being a front wheel keep the sharp turns to a minimum, and go slow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 06:56 pm:

Jim, since you have 2, why don't you borrow a wheel from the other one?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 08:54 pm:

Bad advice time (okay I admit it). I won't explain just how I know this, but you would be amazed at how bad a wheel can be and not break. Well, maybe I should. After driving about fifty miles to get home on a wheel that didn't like the fast turns on an Endurance Run, I tightened it up and drove it several hundred more miles. They were 21 inch wheels and I was replacing them with the earlier and more correct 30X3.5s. After replacing all the wheels on the car, I took that one and tried to break it by laying it flat and putting the felloe on some blocks. Then I jacked the back end of my dad's pickup almost off the ground from the T wheel's hub. It didn't break.
However, please be careful. I love the dusty brown rings that show up on painted felloes. They warn you of a future serious problem before it gets serious. There are good ways to tighten wheels if you get to them early enough and if the wood isn't rotted. Trailering is a good idea. And drive slow, forces go up exponentially with speed. (I drove slow that 50 miles.)
Happy Holidays, And definitely, drive carefully, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 10:37 pm:

That would be a good idea John, but the wheels on my Fordor are red :-).

Well I tried to nail a nail in the end of one of the tenons and the pieces split, turned to powder and chipped off. It reminded me of a piece of wood that was burnt until it was charcoal and just like the pieces of brittle charcoal would easily chip off, so did the end of the tenon. No matter how deep I tried to nail into the tenon, the pieces chipped off, so there is no way I'm going to chance it. There will be plenty of time to show it off after the wheel is fixed, but I just can't take the chance. I had no idea it was so bad. From now on I'm going to keep a close watch on my remaining three wheels. Right now they are good, solid and tight. Jim Patrick


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration