13 Roadster Paint

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: 13 Roadster Paint
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darin Hull on Thursday, December 23, 2010 - 10:29 pm:

I've been thinking about this lately, a new paint job for the ol' T. I know it's a preference thing, but I'd like to hear what some of you have to say about it.

Color of the 13T. I've considered three different options for repainting the T.

1) I've been told the original color was probably a midnight blue with black fenders. So I could work towards making it more original looking. And I'm sure it would look sharp.

2) Even though the 13 T isn't from the black era, that's what people seem familiar with when it comes to Ts... how many folks would love to show their kids a black T and start the line, "You can have any color you want..." So, I could paint it all black, which can look good.

3) Keep it red (body)/black (fenders) as it is currently painted. Different looking but can also look good.

If I get it repainted... any suggestions on what to do? Do I take the whole car to a paint shop? Maybe take all the body parts off and just take them in? Could I take it anywhere? Or would it be better to avoid the "Maccos" and try to find someone that has certain experience? Or do it myself? :-) What would be a ballpark figure I could expect from the cost of repainting?

Alright, thanks for your time.

Curious,
Darin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, December 23, 2010 - 11:17 pm:

Does your car really need to be repainted?

If it has been kept in good dry storage, a good cleaning, polishing and waxing of the paint may be all it needs. In other words, old fashioned elbow grease instead of $$$.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Thursday, December 23, 2010 - 11:25 pm:

Darin thanks for the info and DOB,much appreciated johnd


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Friday, December 24, 2010 - 12:00 am:

I like black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, December 24, 2010 - 12:53 am:

First of all the tourings and the roadsters are the same color in 1913. Personal preference is the answer. Do what you want. For myself, I like to go the correct way, and that is midnight blue with black fenders. Wheels are also blue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darin Hull on Friday, December 24, 2010 - 02:07 am:

Anyone have a picture of a T with the best guess as what the midnight blue should look like? Because I know I've seen different shades of dark blue...

Darin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darin Hull on Friday, December 24, 2010 - 02:09 am:

Erik,

It's something I'll be looking into, but I'm all about saving money. Do you have a good recommendation of product to use in order to get the best results out of an barn fresh paint job?

Darin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darin Hull on Friday, December 24, 2010 - 02:11 am:

Ed, I like that picture... that really helps out.

Thank you,
Darin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Friday, December 24, 2010 - 02:13 am:

Some posts about blue for 1913

As for repaint cost, when you get an estimate from a body shop, you will probably keep it red!
A quality paint job will be many thousands on a T, most shops will do it right...and that costs in todays economy.

Do it yourself with lesser degree of quality would be more economical.


http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/125711.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/153793.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Friday, December 24, 2010 - 02:53 am:

Darin-

I agree with Erik. What does it really need? Let's have a look at what you have to work with.

If you decide to paint it, I'd say paint it with the body off. Here is my color choice for "midnight blue" that I used on my 1911.



I used Diamont Uno (their single stage) color 4635-A. Turns out it was a dark dark blue that was used on Mercedes Benz from about 1963-1967. The Mercedes color code is DB-332 (dunkelblau). It is truly a deep, deep blue that looks black until you get the light on it.

This is NOT DB-904, which is a very nice Mercedes blue that has been suggested in the past. My color is much darker.

: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By peter kable Kiama Australia on Friday, December 24, 2010 - 07:58 pm:

Hi Darin,

quick question.

Was your Model T your grandfathers car?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George...Cherry Hill, NJ on Friday, December 24, 2010 - 08:44 pm:

Darin,

The best you'll probably get is to research those past threads, and then pic which one your own eyes like the best. We simply are still stuck working from the old 'so dark it appears black most of the time and has a blue cast in light' discription.

No one knows the original pigment/varnish/suspension agent and both old blue and old green pigments can not be reverse engineered under an electron microspoe as both the blue and green pigments of the era oxidixe from the moment they were milled and today we have stabilizers to attempt to hold 'the fountain of youth' look, but they didn't have them then.

My guess and only a guess based on research that has been endless is that whatever Ford used was PROBABLY pure Prussian Blue suspended in an oil based varnish, that probably had a high ratio of black to begin with because of cost. I base this comment on the fact that paint was still an alchemy of the time based on how coarse or how fine the powder was made, pigment was still relatively expensive at the time, and therefore the economical answer for the early 20th century for the components (not the formula) would be Prussian Blue powder suspended in an oil varnish with no other 'carrier' added. Looked at from this perspective, I'll share that as Blue as we all see pure Prussian Blue, suspend it in oil and it goes 99% black when dried, but still reflects blue-black.

Just an opinion...somewhat of an educated one...can't prove it...but I think I'm very close to being right!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darin Hull on Saturday, December 25, 2010 - 10:02 pm:

Guys, here's some pictures of the barn fresh T. She obviously needs attention and some new paint, eventually. But if I do wait on the paint, is there any product you guys suggest I try in order to make the best of what's there?

DarinSideBackFront


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Saturday, December 25, 2010 - 11:55 pm:

Peter Yes it was his grandfathers car Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from the Danuser's in Fulton Mo, we've been snowplowing for two days and have another days worth tommorrow, bed is calling tell Sally and the Kids Hello and Best Wish's


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darin Hull on Sunday, December 26, 2010 - 01:58 am:

Peter,

Yep, John is right. This is grandpa's T and he wanting me to take over its care. It'll be a chance to keep the T, and its memories, in the family and form new ones with my children, his great-grandchildren.

Darin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Sunday, December 26, 2010 - 05:10 am:

Midnight Blue has about 15 different variations to it and maybe even more, you'll need to go way down the bottom of the range , just before it turns to black.
Again this color is always a personal choice, some like the lighter version, but like Larry, l prefer to be as close as is possible....almost black.
CLICK on my name and see how dark my blue is.
It does confuse people and l too have had people talking about the black T, until they stand in the right position and bang, not black at all !!
Then again, if you like "your"T red, then who's to argue, red is a cool T color.
Hope this helps.

Cheers David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker - Sumter, SC on Sunday, December 26, 2010 - 08:35 am:

Darin,

It’s great that you have your Grandfather’s T. It can be a lot of fun telling stories about the car that he has shared and that you may have experienced yourself.

I would assume it is the old style paint that did NOT put a clear coat on top. If so, the article at: http://classiccars.about.com/od/maintenancetips/ht/paintcare.htm has some good advice. If it was painted in the last 25 years or so check to make sure it is NOT clear coat. Recommend ask your Grandfather when and what type of paint he used (I still have empty cans of the paint my Dad and I used back in the 1980s so I won’t forget what we used). Lots of folks used the old style lacquer paint prior to the 1970s because it was easy to paint and you could very easily sand out any runs while you were learning to paint. The older style paint can be polished and if oxidized really bad you can use the rubbing compound – but I would not use a motorized device with the rubbing compound as it is very easy to rub through the paint especially on and around the moldings. And of course before you do any of that – try washing and waxing the car or at least a spot on the car to see if it shines up some before you use any of the more aggressive methods. If the car was stored inside away from the sunshine the oxidation should be a lot less than if it was stored in the sunlight.

But if you are planning to paint it – I would recommend avoid anything with silicon in it – as it can be hard to remove it all and it tends to mess up new paint jobs if any is left on the body. See Fisheyes on paint at: http://www.customclassictrucks.com/techarticles/0903cct_troubleshooting_truck_pa int/fisheye_gas_bubbles_and_paint_bleeding.html Note grease and oil can also cause the fisheye problem – but I believe it is easier to remove than the silicon.

Again – great looking 1913 and welcome to the forum.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Sunday, December 26, 2010 - 09:22 am:

Darin,

Great looking '13 roadster.

If you just want to enjoy the car for a while, but still plan to paint it someday, I would recommend you stay away from any polish product that contains any type of silicone (not silicon).

I assume Hap meant to say the same thing!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, December 26, 2010 - 12:54 pm:

I will be embarking on painting my 13 Runabout in the near future. I am going to paint it all black. Steps I am taking-bare metal, epoxy primer, primer surfacer, single stage paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By peter kable Kiama Australia on Sunday, December 26, 2010 - 08:35 pm:

Darin,

I first met your grandfather when he traveled to a tour here in Australia.

My wife and kids traveled with him in the roadster at different times way back in 1983 on a tour with the MTFCA and then afterwards stayed with him at his house in Dayton.

I'm not sure if it was at that time I saw you as a baby or on subsequent trips but we all have fond memories of those visits.

When my wife and I visit next year we look forward to seeing you grandfather again which if my memory serves me right he will be celerbrating his 100th birthday.

Your grandfather has quite a long Model T history and his wooden car trailer is a legend in Model T circles.

One story I often tell is of being in a modern vehicle traveling behind your grandfather and his friend Nan late at night after a tour dinner in Kentucky in 1991 . It was pouring rain he has the roof folded down as usual on the 1913 Roadster. They were both soaked to the skin when they got back to the Motel but neither of them was fazed about it. When I see younger people complain about getting a few drops of water on them it makes me think how soft the younger generations have become.

Good luck with the roadster what even color you decide to paint it I'm sure you and your family will have lots of fun in the future


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