Towing a 13T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: Towing a 13T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darin Hull on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 10:45 am:

Quick question:

I don't have a trailer, so I'm going to have to rent one. I'm planning on towing a 13 roadster T about 400 miles this spring. Is a U-Haul auto transport trailer the best idea? Or is there anything that you guys know would work better? A 13 T weighs what? 1000-1200ish lbs?

Darin

U-Haul Trailer


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 10:58 am:

I have used Uhaul trailers, they are fine as long as they are serviced well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:02 am:

Can you rent enclosed?? What would the cost differance between a hauller or rent?? Longer haulls better! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By M. C. Hawker on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:05 am:

I would never, ever tow a T further than around the block on an open trailer. The buffeting from the wind, stray sand and pebbles kicked up by traffic can play havoc with your top, windshield and paint.

A good friend went and got my 27 TT for me as a surprise using his open trailer. Only 75 miles total. Succeeded in blowing a hole in the top.

Cover the car with a tarp? Ever see an open trailer covered with a tarp going down the road with the wind whipping the tarp into a frenzy, beating the daylights out of the cargo?

Please have mercy on your '13 and rent,beg or otherwise obtain a covered car trailer. You may be very sorry if you don't.

Sorry to be so negative. Just 55 years experience in hauling old iron.

Tony


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:05 am:

I bought a Model T Coupe at Chicksha, Ok. and rented a Uhaul like the one pictured above and hauled the coupe 1200 miles. Had problems with the tie downs because of the skinny tires but pulled like a dream.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darin Hull on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:15 am:

Tony,

No apology necessary, that's why I asked. I was going to try to measure the T, when I see it in a few weeks, and see what sized enclosed trailer would be required. The auto trailer is, of course, designed to haul cars... but common sense said it could pose a problem for an open T.

That's why I posted the question to you guys, to see what better suggestions might be out there.

Darin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:16 am:

I used a U-Haul trailer for a Tudor and drove about 500 miles- it was unrestored so it didn't matter- worked great. I bought extra ratcheting straps and tie-downs to really secure her. One for each quadrant of the car for sure and a "boomer" for the front frame to the front of the trailer just in case.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - Lyons, GA on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:17 am:

I have heard of people wrapping a car in stretch wrap to protect it from sand and rain while towing on an open trailer. Might be OK for the once in a lifetime move. Wouldn't want to do it every time I took one to a car show, though.

If the wind blew a hole in the top, I'd have to question the integrity of the top to start with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:28 am:

If your top is in a top boot you won't have that problem. Of course it takes only a few minutes to remove the top assembly from the car, so that is an option if no suitable top boot is available.

I've towed all over the country with my T on an open trailer. No issues except it gets wet and dirty. This trailer was made specifically for hauling Model T's. The tie down locations are specially placed to attach to the springs, which makes the car stable, and unable to bounce around. If the car is allowed to bounce the straps quicly loosen.

Be sure to never tie straps to the rear axle or front axle. You can damage the axle assemblies easily, or the wishbone, or the engine pan if the straps are tightened while connected to the axles.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By M. C. Hawker on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:28 am:

Well Hal, the old girl is original, unrestored and retired in 1950 when the farmer got his new 8N. Was moved from the barn to a leanto garage addition in 1970 where I found it two years ago. Strangely, the roof patch glued on the original hole held up just fine. Cleaned the windshield, fuel system, changed oil and put new tires on her and she runs like a Swiss watch. Even the mag works. This is my first T and I'm amazed at her mechanical condition. Those farmer brothers really took exceptional care of their equipment!

Tony


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By willie k cordes on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:43 am:

Towing a touring car on an open trailer requires a little application of "common sense".
A model T was not made to travel at 70MPH.
The top needs to be down and tied to prevent it from flopping in the wind (70MPH).
Seats, floor boards and even floor mats can fly out at highway speeds.
Even the hood and anything else that could come loose needs to be secured.
The straight up windshield on a 13 was not made to withstand that strong a wind.
Just some food for thought for open towing.
Have fun :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darin Hull on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:46 am:

Do those enclosed U-haul trailers even have the structural integrity in the floor to handle the wight and movement of a T? What is the weight of a 13 T?



Royce,

I do have a top boot. Thanks for the information on not using tie downs on the axle. No matter what kind of trailer I end up getting, guess I'll try to tie it down like you have in your pictures.

Darin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - Lyons, GA on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:47 am:

Tony,

That is a bummer to put a hole in the top of a survivor. I hope I didn't offend you with my post above. The top on my wife's 'new' '18 Touring is not original, but is old and I have my doubts about it's integrity. It has a couple of small holes. It is canvas and I have thought about using an iron-on patch.

I once saw a Model A Tudor or Fordor at a swap meet. It was unrestored, or at least a very 'older restoration'. The top material of the inset soft top had been ripped to shreds by towing to the swap meet on an open trailer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 12:15 pm:

I rented one of those open U-haul trailers in 2002 to haul my 1926 Model T coupe, 1,500 miles from York, Maine to Bartow, Florida behind a 1/2 ton Chevy 1500 pickup. The trip went without a flaw. At first I drove the recommended 45 mph, but it didn't take long to realize this was dangerous and I gradually sped up until I discovered that the trailer was easily capable of keeping up with the 70 mph traffic.

U-Haul will refuse to rent to you if they are unable to enter the car being hauled into their database and the Model T is not in their database, so when you go to rent it, go pick it up without your Model T and say you will be hauling a Volkswagon, then drive it away to load.

If you are hauling a long distance:

Prior to departure, after loading the Model T up and tying her down, I purchased a 6 mil roll of 20' x 100' clear visqueen (sheet plastic). I covered the Model T with a soft car cover and then wrapped the Model T with several layers of visqueen, under the car and over both shortways and long ways. I then used 3 full rolls of grey duct tape and tightly wrapped and wrapped, over and under and all around to keep the visqueen from coming off so the car would be protected from road debris. It is not necessary to remove your floorboards or hood as the visqueen and duct tape will hold them securely in place. You may want to remove your windshield and frame as they might get broken by the wrapped visqueen and duct tape. I would wrap it with the top down. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By M. C. Hawker on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 12:28 pm:

Good grief no, Hal! A very pertinent observation!

When I answered the door and saw my beloved "Henrietta" sitting naked on John's trailer I expected the worst! I have no idea how he tied it down or how fast he drove! Hopefully not over 70!

I was sort of mad because I considered it my responsibility to load and unload it and not have my friends do all the dirty work! But all turned out OK in the end. I have a new top kit but will most likely try another patch just to keep the "Beverly Hillbillies" aura intact.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 12:31 pm:

I once purchased a 1910 Oakland in west Texas, and hauled it to eastern Nebraska on an open trailer. Much of the car was original including the top and upholstery, so I was worried about wind and weather.

After removing all boards, brass, etc and tying down the top with bungy straps, it towed pretty good without evidence of flapping (watching in my mirrors as I met semis, etc).

The only problem was when I spotted a big thuderstorm ahead of me as I approached Amarillo. But I was prepared, and hurriedly wrapped the entire car in plastic wrap that I had along.

Of course, this was summer, and it was about a 100 degrees, and I had to repeatedly step up on, over and around the trailer as I wrapped the car. After about 45 minutes, and almost a heat stroke, I had the car wrapped (it looked like a "mummy" wrapped in plastic), and drove into the thunderstorm. Of course, the storm fizzled, and only about twenty drops of rain hit the car.

Bottom line, the plastic wrap held up very nicely all the way back to Nebraska, and if I had to haul a car on an open trailer any distance, I'd probably wrap it like that again. The only difference is, I'd wrap the bulk of the car before rolling it onto a trailer, so I could walk around it while wrapping it.

Good luck, sounds like a great car. BTW, I've found that most of your "better T people" own 1913 T's (see profile :-)),

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 12:59 pm:

I bought a '16 T Roadster from Mark at Model T Haven and loaded it on an open trailer. I stopped 20 miles from his place to check it out and found I had lost the door.
Oh well, it wasn't much anyway. (Bought it off Ebay)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 04:40 pm:

A friend of mine hauled my T on an open trailer 575 miles at 65 mph on the Interstate. No problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Harrison,Norco Ca on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 05:14 pm:

I picked up my 27 Tudor and towed it back to So. Cal (over 1600 miles the route I took)this November on a uhaul.Went very well no problems and it wasn't even covered,1927 Tudor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 05:33 pm:

I don't pretend to offer any wisdom on this issue, but can tell you my own experience. As I have sometimes remarked, Plan A was to win the lottery, buy an enclosed trailer and pull it with a Lincoln Navigator. Since the first step of Plan A never happened, I switched to Plan B, which entailed an open trailer and a Ford Explorer.

Since I don't tow it around town (I drive it if I have to be somewhere within 30 or 40 miles), I'm always on a highway, so I put the top down. Before I got a top boot, I used to secure the top with bungee cords. Now that I have the top boot, I put on the boot and then wrap bungee cords around it anyway. I put a brick on the rear floorboard and two bricks on the front floorboard. Sometimes the two sloping front floorboards vibrate out of place despite the bricks, sometimes they don't. As far as losing floor mats etc., I don't doubt anyone's stories about that happening, but it has never happened to me. (Once, as I was securing the car, I noticed a wadded-up paper towel on the rear floor, but forgot to remove it. When I stopped 50 or 60 miles down the road for something, the paper towel was still there.)

This is my experience only. Your mileage may differ... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Aiken, SC on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 06:09 pm:

Worked for me. For all 3 T's :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 06:30 pm:

Darin - I have to agree with Royce, I have towed my touring on an open trailer for thousands of miles. I do remove the floorboards and the seat cushions and On my 24 I tilt the top part of the windshield so that it is horizontal to the ground. I stack the top down and make sure that it is tucked in and stacked tight and strapped very tight so that it does not catch wind. I have never had a problem except that it can get wet and dirty. The Photo below is pretty much how I stack the top for towing on the trailer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 07:01 pm:

Heading for home after the 2006 Show-Me Tour...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Wells Western Australia on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 07:13 pm:

This trailer has been used for 3 return trips across Australia, 3500 mile, 4000 mile and 5000 mile. First with a 1997 Subaru Forester, second trip with a Hyundia i30 1600cc diesel and last trip with a Subaru Forester 2000cc diesel. Sitting around the 60 to 70 mph mark (don't tell the cops, not supposed to do more than 60 with a trailer). All up weight of car and trailer 2550lb. Measurement converted from metric for your convenience.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 08:12 pm:

Sorry,I think to many this will sound crass or rude but to tell the truth,im glad at 60 to 70 mph your haulling in Australlia instead of in the USA!! At 2550 pounds on a single axel trailer hooked to very small cars to me looks like a death trap going 60 to 70 mph!! Sorry,i hope you do well but i would not haul that way!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Wells Western Australia on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 09:02 pm:

Ken
The all up weight is 2550lb not 2550lb on a trailer. A long draw bar and trailing arm suspension gives a very stable trailing unit. No pitching, no bump steer. The suspension, wheels and tyres are all rated higher than that weight. The load is under the legal towing weight of each vehicle and the trailer has brakes. It doesn't jackknife under heavy braking. I have used a dual axle trailer behind a Landcruiser, not as good as my setup. The speed mentioned was on good roads. One section has no bends for 90 miles. The proof is in 7 years of trouble free use. Have a happy new year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 09:05 pm:

Dick L.,

I'd heard you were "a few bricks short of a load". After reading how you tow your T, I realize where the bricks are :-).

Sorry, I couldn't resist,

Happy New Year


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 09:11 pm:

Rob,

Yeah, but once I get home, they go back into the load... :-)

Happy New Year to you as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 09:13 pm:

I have taken My Fordor on at least 4 cross country trips and my runabout on at least 2. All consisting of around 5000 miles and all on an open 18 foot trailer. I sewed a bra for the cars and strap it tight and tie the car down with six 10,000 pound straps. So far so good, though when I was learning I didn't have the bra straps tight enough and the buckles did leave rub marks in the paint. I seldom go over 70 MPH but usually stay at 65. I have a 4 wheel trailer with brakes on all wheels. One more comment...my Fordor is a driver and not a pristine show car. My Runabout is also a driver, but is restored to an "almost" show car. I tow the Runabout with the top up, but I insert a thick slab of foam between the top bow and the top because the bra doesn't completely eliminate flop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 09:33 pm:

This is how we moved our 1919 wagon about 100 miles.
We kept the speed to about 60 max and had a great time waving at all the smiling people.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 09:47 pm:

"...because the bra doesn't completely eliminate flop."

Hal, I've known women who say the same thing... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Georgetown Ontario Canada on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 09:53 pm:

We pull our 27 Hack with pretty much the exact same set up as Fred has pictured.

I take out the seat cushions and floor mat and we are good to go.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 10:17 pm:

I tow my 24 Touring with the top up and side curtains installed with a Chevy 1500 pickup and my 16 ft flatbed trailer. I do remove the mirrors and wind wings. I have pulled it several thousand miles with no problem. The 24 windshield stanchions are more stout than the 13 and Royce's advice should be considered..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Rice- Houston on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:20 pm:

The tire straps of the UHaul trailer will pop off in time, as they slip off the skinny tires. I learned to put the strap netting over the tire, then thread the strap in and out through the wooden spokes to better keep it centered on the wheel. Then I added a bunch of my own straps. Worked like a charm! I kinda like the open trailer, you can count the number of friendly honks and thumbs up you get!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Rice- Houston on Tuesday, December 28, 2010 - 11:25 pm:

The tire straps of the UHaul trailer will pop off in time, as they slip off the skinny tires. I learned to put the strap netting over the tire, then thread the end of the strap in and out through the wooden spokes to better keep it centered on the wheel. Then I added a bunch of my own straps. Worked like a charm! I kinda like the open trailer, you can count the number of friendly honks and thumbs up you get!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Missett Wyoming, PA (NE) on Wednesday, December 29, 2010 - 01:36 am:

I've towed my 23 Fordor from PA to NH on a U-Haul trailer with no issues.

23 Fordor on a U Haul


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