One for the WWI tank enthusiast : a German Tank photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2010: One for the WWI tank enthusiast : a German Tank photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 09:53 am:

http://cgi.ebay.com/early-1900s-photo-Armoured-auto-German-made-capt-/2506525764 99?pt=Art_Photo_Images&hash=item3a5c0ecaf3

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By eric flower on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 10:05 am:

A model T "tank".....Or armor car...That's cool.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 10:17 am:

Tanks first appeared in WWI in 1917 on the British side. The Germans, who had never seen one, fled their trenches in terror and the British made great gains in that battle. The Germans quickly developed a tank of their own which made its' first appearance on the battlefield in April of 1918. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Saltsgaver on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 11:01 am:

It didnt' take long for the germans to convert elephant gun technology into anti tank rifles. The working conditions inside those early tanks was awful.

Weren't ambulances the largest role of the model T during the war?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Houston on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 12:06 pm:

Probably, The American Hospital in Paris had as many as 100 Model T's assigned to their staff as early as 1914. Most were Ambulances. I am beginning the restoration of "Susan". Anyone know where to get WW1 stretchers?

P1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Ohio on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 12:57 pm:

Fred,

I have a couple of old Army stretchers my guess would be WWII or Korea. I don't know if they changed much. They are heavy green canvas wrapped around wood handles and have very short metal loop feet. All non canvas parts are paint olive drab.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Houston on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 03:06 pm:

Denny, Beats what I got. What is condition, price, etc. email modeltgrg@cox.net. Fred


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 03:27 pm:

I saw the 1918 Ford tank at the Patton Museum in Fort Knox Kentucky last summer when I attended the AACA National Meet in Louisville.

I was also impressed by the Renault FT 17 tank also in display. It has a very interesting story. In 2003, two FT 17 tanks were discovered in a military scrapyard in Kabul, Afghanistan (of all places) by Major Robert Redding. With permission from the Afghan government, the two tanks were transferred to the Patton museum, where one of them was restored and is now on display.

The first four pictures of the Ford tank were taken by me. The pictures of the Renault tank are from the internet.

Tank 1
Tank 2
Tank 3
Tank 4
Tank 5
Tank 6


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 03:39 pm:

Neat stuff!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 03:58 pm:

Since the spring is upside down - does that make the whole tank unsprung weight?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 04:26 pm:

This is a bit off thread...customer brought these in a while back. Most Tinnies are pre WWII...thought some might enjoy these.
Bob




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Saltsgaver on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 05:33 pm:

All of the armor is being moved from Ft. Knox to Ft. Benning, Ga. We used to do ww2 reenactments at the museum, but I think those days are over.

They would let us reenactors into the museum after hours & let us crawl all over the tanks....really cool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack McRoberts - Perth, West Australia on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 08:00 pm:

"Tanks first appeared in WWI in 1917 on the British side. The Germans, who had never seen one, fled their trenches in terror and the British made great gains in that battle. The Germans quickly developed a tank of their own which made its' first appearance on the battlefield in April of 1918."


Close, Jim. :-)

The first battle into which the new tank was thrown, was at Flers/Courcellette on 15 Sep 1916. Of the 49 initially available, only 36 reached the start line. Despite this new weapon, the offensive by the British, NZ and Canadians, stalled. The British were keen to use this new weapon and in their rush to achieve much needed successes, they used these vehicles before sufficient numbers had been accumulated and before workable tactics had been devised.

It was not until the Battle of Cambrai (Nov/Dec 1917) which employed over 400 rhomboidal tanks, that some success over the terrain and the enemy was achieved.

Although the Germans were slow to accept the new technology and produced few of their own tanks during WW1, they made up for that in the next stoush.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Saltsgaver on Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 08:20 pm:

Even in the 2nd war, Germany didn't have superior tanks until they ran into the russian T34. They rushed the Panther tank into production & it, along with the tiger & king tiger were great tanks.

I've met 2 german vet tanker guys & neither got to use the newer tanks. They were stuck using the captured French & Chech tanks, which didn't stand up to the russian tanks very well.


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