New owner of a 24 TT

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: New owner of a 24 TT
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hermstedt on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 06:59 pm:

Hello everyone - I am the proud new owner of a 1924 Model T Ton truck. I am planning a total restore of the truck and have begun the teardown to the frame. Here a pic when we picked her up on 7/30/20111924 TT


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hermstedt on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 07:07 pm:

Here is a progress photo. I was able to geteverything off except the steering gear.

Then I am thinking engine and running gear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 07:47 pm:

Great looking TT William. Looks like it was all there. I'll be looking forward to following your progress.

Is there a manufacturer name plate or stamp on your cab or box?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 08:12 pm:

Looks like your truck is pretty complete and in relatively good condition. It should be be a real good looker when you're done. It may be nosy of me to ask, but have you done a restoration before? If not, I'll give you a heads-up from somebody who's been through this before.

1. Take lots of pictures before and during disassembly. Take pictures of everything, from several different angles. No matter how many you take, later you'll find something you'll wish you had shot. When you take apart an assembly (like radiator mounting hardware) lay out the pieces in order, like an exploded view in a parts book, and take a picture of all of them together.

2. Put all the nuts, bolts, and other fasteners from each component in a plastic bag and label it. It's a lead pipe cinch that you'll forget what at least some of them are. Include even the ones that are destroyed in removal, so you'll know later what you have to replace.

3. Always remember this maxim: Everything takes longer than you think it will. What you expect to do in weeks is more likely to take months. (I have one project that's twenty years old.) There is absolutely no chance that you'll remember everything. The more you document going in, the easier it will be coming out.

4. Have the Ford Bible


and all the applicable MTFCA books. They will save you a lot of grief.

5. Consult the Model T Ecyclopedia. It's available on this website and you can buy it on disk from the author, Bruce McCalley. Fifty bucks well spent.

6. If you don't find the info anywhere else, consult the forum. There's a vast wealth of experience and knowledge here. Somebody will probably know, even if their political opinions are delusional baloney. (Now there are a bunch of guys wondering, "Is he talking about ME?")


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 09:49 pm:

Hi William, and welcome to the joys of TT ownership!

If not already installed, I would suggest looking for an auxiliary overdrive gearbox to put in, just makes it that much easier to drive in faster traffic.

I enjoy my TT and certainly use it regularly, - don't be put off by any 'speedster' drivers' comments :-)

Cheers

Adrian
1926 TT Flat Deck truck (see my profile picture)


(ps - Steve has some good advice there too)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 10:34 pm:

If this is your first venture into Model T land, take what Steve Jelf just said as "Gospel".
Absolutely nothing on these "Horseless Carriages" works the way you think it does.
Ask questions of the form members here, no matter how insignificant (or stupid) you might think the question is. It will help you keep from making some costly mistakes.
I wish you had posted the first picture here before you took it apart. Some here (like me) would have told you to to leave it as is and only repair what you have to to make it safe and drivable. Original ones are often worth more than 'restored' ones because they are only original once.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim morsher on Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 10:41 pm:

it appears to be a #267B Martin-Parry Open Top Two-Unit Express Body ...........the cab by itself would be the #20B Martin-Parry Vestibule Cab ..........there is an almost endless variety of combinations when it come to Martin-Parry, but this is an easy one. great looking truck !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hermstedt on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 07:29 pm:

Hey guys thanks for the advice. Here is a pic of the cab manufacturer

I read it as Wager and Karpeles from Philly

Steve this is my first Model T adventure but I recently finished a 1974 VW Thing


Steve I agree that if a vhicle is in good shape it is better being original than restored.
I don't think that is the case here. The cab is in pretty could shape and I plan on reusing most of it. The bed of the truck on the other hand was all dryrotted. The metal parts will need some work to be straight but almost everything is there.

I will be posting progress pictures and I will be asking plenty of questions and refering to the forum often. I know that someone has done what I am trying to do.
Thanks in advance for everyones help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hermstedt on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 07:32 pm:

Sorry pics are not uploading. I have not mastered that yet on this site.

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hermstedt on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 09:06 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hermstedt on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 09:08 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 10:06 pm:

Well, you're off to a good start with your TT. You already know what a slow, square, '4 banger' that will go almost anywhere, is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 10:31 pm:

A little VW trivia: In the USA it was the Thing; in Mexico it was the Safari.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Thursday, September 15, 2011 - 04:30 am:

And don't the father of em all, the Kübelwagen.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_K%C3%BCbelwagen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim morsher on Thursday, September 15, 2011 - 09:52 pm:

William, that brass tag you show is very nice to have on the body, but is from the dealer that sold it, and not the maker of the body. Here is a picture of the catalog page out of an early Martin-Parry catalog, that i believe shows your body. if you look clsoely you can see a small oval decal on the sheetmetal behing the door. i would really love to see more detail pictures of yours. i have one, also, and am missing the bracket that holds the doors in an open postion, which your appear to still have. .martin-parry catalogmartin parry cab


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hermstedt on Friday, September 16, 2011 - 05:49 pm:

Tim,
That is great info thanks. Here are some pics I took for uou of the door catch. It looks like it would be pretty easy for a metal worker to make.


Thanks Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnold Wallace on Friday, September 16, 2011 - 10:18 pm:

William,
As an owners of a '25 TT and a '31 Coupe, as time goes by we have learned that the unrestored body on an older car is admired with the patina, cracked paint, mud on the spokes, etc. Those checkbook restorations sure shine and look nice, but we admire the "10 footer" that is in top shape mechanically and ready to drive on that 200 mile tour...a daily driver.
Just my 2 cents.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim morsher on Saturday, September 17, 2011 - 05:22 pm:

bill, great pics and a great help ! the screw holes are in my cab, but never knew what the holder looked like. this will fix me up. if you PM me with your address, i will copy the catalog pages and send them on to you. again, many thanks ! tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hermstedt on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 05:00 pm:

I keep putting off posting updates my bad. I was able to get everything off of the frame.
bare frame
My dad built a wooden engine stand from a post I saw here.

Since the winter is coming I think my next step will be to restore the cab peices and have taht ready for the spring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hermstedt on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 05:07 pm:

I have alot of oil coming form one side of the rear axle. I will need to change the seals. Can any one give me some advice on the job? Is it easy or hard? How do you get the dust cap off?

I don't want to use the wrong method and damage something.
Thanks,
Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 05:27 pm:

William,

The dust cap is just tapped into place when it's installed. taking it off just requires gently pulling and twisting until it comes free. I very gently used a pipe wrench to twist/pull and it came right off.

I found the same thing as your photo show on one side of my TT rear end when I took it apart. The inner rear end seal, the inner bearing seal, and the outer seal had all failed.

A few of thoughts:

1. When you take it apart be sure to carefully examine the axle, particularly on the outer roller bearing surface. Mine was worn down nearly 1/8". I had to replace the axle and the bearing (and of course all the seals). My theroy is that the leaking oil washed away the outer bearing grease thus causing damage to the then improperly lubricated outer bearing.

2. If you're not planning to disassemble the rear end, you should reconsider. The oil seen in the photo is roof positive that the inner rear end seal has failed and must be replaced (it's the one that containes the oil inside the rearend and allows oil lubrication if the inner ball bearing.) Interestingly, the bearing sleeve was OK.

3. Don't be intimidated (as I was at first) when takeing apart the worm drive unit. Unlike a regular differential, there are no adjustments to make when putting it back to gether. As long as you keep track ot what goes where, you just bolt it back as it came apart.

Good Luck!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome R. Hoffman Hays, KS on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 05:32 pm:

Tim & Bill, I too want to see lots of pictures, my 1926 M&P cat does not show this cab.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 05:37 pm:

William, I used the modern replcement (lip type)inner oil seals that the vendors sell. I wouldn't use anything else, they work VERY nicely. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Stitt-Oregon on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 05:43 pm:

Can't tell much from pictures and what may be needed but I'm with you Arnold. What a great looking truck.
There is just nothing quite as beautiful as an old Model T with all its wrinkles. To each his own.
My T is not restored and I have little worries.
Sweet truck. Restored or unrestored.
Have fun with your project William.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Brownsburg,In. on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 06:01 pm:

Jerome,any chance your 26 M&P catalog has a picture of M&P all metal cab? We ran into a guy who has one couple years back and it is a real neat truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Sutton on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 06:32 pm:

Thats a great truck and it sure will be neat when it's done. If you don't mind some free advice, I will share my experiences.

DO NOT tear everything apart at once. Are you going to remember where all the fasteners go in the wood for the cab 6 months from now, while you're tripping over engine, transmission, and rear end parts? A long time ago a friend told me to strip the car down to the frame and put all the fasteners back in one part or the other, then clean/prime/paint everything while rebuilding from the chassis up. He also said to do the major rebuilds one at a time so it's fresh in the mind and easier on the wallet. You don't need to have your engine/trans apart at the same time as the rear end and the bodywork, etc. It just keeps everything easier and also takes less space.

The last thing you want to do is get it blown apart into buckets of bolts and piles of wood and parts and have no idea where half of it is. 20 years from now it would still be in the same condition!

All Model T'ers are still learning so don't worry about asking for help too. You might even find someone local that can help out with some visits.

And don't worry about rebuilding the rear end. It's all in the shop manual which is written for guys like us to understand, step by step. It even tells us how to tear apart and completely rebuild a Model T. How perfect is that?!

Craig


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome R. Hoffman Hays, KS on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 06:50 pm:

Jack, yes it does, but right now I only have my laptop, my desktop with scanner is down, but hope to have it working by the end of the week. I'll try and post some in a few days.

A quick question: his truck, is the front of the cab also metal?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Brownsburg,In. on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 06:56 pm:

Yes and it has a sun shield and metal M&P step plates in it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenny Edmondson, Indianapolis, In. on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 09:04 pm:

Heres a couple pictures of my future truck Jack is talking about. Not the greatest pics but you'll get the idea.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 09:31 pm:

I think that body manufacturer on the sills with the cross is one of the more desireable ones. There was a post about here somewhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenny Edmondson, Indianapolis, In. on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 05:04 pm:

Patrick, That is the Martin Parry insignia. Made in Indianapolis. The P on the step plate is hard to see in the photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 12:52 am:

Kenny,
I'd love to see more pictures of your M-P and any dimensions, as the one I hope to resurrect has nothing left of the vertical pieces.
T'
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenny Edmondson, Indianapolis, In. on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 06:23 am:

Dave, it's not mine yet. I've been working on the guy for a couple years though. I can get pictures at some time, but it will be a while since it's about 70 miles away.


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