Identify T Tractor conv.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Identify T Tractor conv.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way . Wa. on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 11:09 am:

I had these pictures sent to me a couple years ago, He wasn't quiet sure what conv. kit it is,
any help.

Bob



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 11:35 am:

I dunno but I sure like it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way . Wa. on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 12:31 pm:

I just looked on the back of one picture and it said Shaw conversion, I haden't heard of it before. Thanks for the note ,I'll visit Him.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Hagstrom on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 12:40 pm:

Yes Mr. McDonald, it is most definately a Shaw conversion. They were produced by Shaw Manufacturing, Galesburg, KS. The city of Galesburg still hosts a Shaw gathering the first weekend after the 4th of July.

One can positively identify a Shaw by the external teeth on the bull gear and the one piece cast iron front wheels.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way . Wa. on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 01:13 pm:

Thanks Donald

This one is in Maine, I need to contact him again, Don't know how we meet one of the good old
collector and car hobbiest things.What year did thay start making them?

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 02:25 pm:

Bob, 1923 Produced Shaw Tractorized Ford using Model T Ford and cast iron wheel kits. Produced through 1931. Using Model A Ford, Chevy and Dodge. Most were sold as a do-it-yourself wheel kit.



Read more: http://gasengine.farmcollector.com/Farm-Life/Shaw-Manufacturing-History.aspx#ixz z1boqg7hSv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Martin on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 08:49 pm:

Interesting to see that the rear axle is turned upside down to drive the tractor forward.
How would you drain the oil at service time.
Keep these articles on iron comming.

Neil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 09:48 pm:

There is no drain plug in a T axle and I doubt that anybody ever changed it. Added to what was left, maybe, but not change it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way . Wa. on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 11:29 pm:

Thanks John & Donald

I'll try and contact the owner and give him the Info. If he dosen't have it.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 12:34 am:

Pretty interesting company and a cool little car. Howdja like to have one of these to run around in?


http://books.google.com/books?id=JtsDAAAAMBAJ&pg=RA1-PA175&lpg=RA1-PA175&dq=shaw +speedster&source=bl&ots=zLK_ICNAr2&sig=bJaHQGMOZmUshWoIFBsfLceWIx4&hl=en&ei=-gW nTu6NDpPXiQKaotWlDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CE8Q6AEwCA#v=one page&q=shaw%20speedster&f=false


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joncrane on Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 01:20 am:

Stan
With those gear ratios you don't RUN aroound in one..best you do is a jog!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stanley D Pierson on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 03:05 pm:

Hi guys, as of 8/1/2011 I now own the yellow
model T at the top of the page that Bob sent In.
Yes it Is a Shaw conversion. I would like to
correspond with other T and Shaw owners

Stan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Hagstrom on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 04:05 pm:

Congrats on acquiring the Shaw. Ask away Stan, we'll help however we can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stanley D Pierson on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 07:02 pm:

Thanks Don,I belong to the Shaw club and every year I get as maney Shaw owners togather as I can
for our annual meet. I would like to add all
conversion tractor owmers to the registery.
I know you live to far away to come to our meet
but there must be others that could come. Any way
we could keep In touch
My T has been remolded In the back and I'am
trying to put It back,I could use some pictures.
I have a good idea what it should be just want
to be sure.
Stan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stanley D Pierson on Saturday, December 24, 2011 - 09:23 am:

Merry Christmas to all and Happy New Year.

Stan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Sunday, December 25, 2011 - 06:19 am:

Here is Ford's first attempt to develop the tractor.
1915 test drove it, this is the third test.
So here it is on the card I bought on ebay:

Ford Motor Co. - Tractors
Model T parts in model
Not produced commercially
Experiment # 3

Merry Christmas to all and Happy New Year.

Ake Osterdahl


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Sunday, December 25, 2011 - 06:21 am:

Here is the picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Sunday, December 25, 2011 - 06:34 am:

Ford Traktor 1915

I Try again, the picture for large before.
The left-hand circular tank for cooling water, and the right one for gasoline.
The steering column is the old 1914, 1915. etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren. (Australia) on Sunday, December 25, 2011 - 07:00 am:

Not his first attempt Ake, his prototype tractors date back before the T, one of then was in 1906, the Automobile plow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Sunday, December 25, 2011 - 10:29 am:

Thanks Kerry for the enlightenment, interesting that I have missed.
Where can I learn more about this?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren. (Australia) on Sunday, December 25, 2011 - 03:09 pm:

This is about all I have in a book called "The ultimate guide to TRACTORS" Jim Glastonbury, England.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By BOB TREVAN on Sunday, December 25, 2011 - 03:59 pm:

WHILE YOU EXPERTS ARE HERE --WHO MADE HIS TYPE ??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Sunday, December 25, 2011 - 04:00 pm:

Thank you Kerry
...I will look for this book and buy it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Hagstrom on Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 09:16 am:

Hi Stan,

This is the only close pic I got the other day. It didn't turn out very well as you can see. I will try and get some light where it is and get a pic of the axle attachment.

I have no idea if this hitch set up is "original" or not. I know I've done nothing with the hitch since I've owned it. The tractor kit was purchased by a guy in New Hampshire from Shaw in 1931. He assembled the tractor he said and it was used to pull a sap wagon in the sugar maple forests of New Hampshire all the years he had it.

There are actually two hitches on this Shaw. One is just a thick piece of flat iron across the two upper frame members. It's been there awhile because it is bolted to the frame flanges with square head bolts and nuts. It has three holes punched in it, one dead center and then one either side about three inches from center. It appears these holes were punched on an anvil and not drilled so this could have been done by a previous owner back in the day.

The other hitch is lower, and you can barely make out a double set of irons and a short swinging drawbar in the center. The drawbar swing is attached by two angled iron pieces you can see above the drawbar. The black thing at the very top of the pic is a model T toolbox attached on the back end. Just below that black area is the upper drawbar with a barely distinguishable round clevis in the center hole. The lower drawbar also has on either end two pipes located vertically with a square headed long bolt going down through it from the model T frame flange down to the double drawbar pieces. You can see that bolt somewhat clearly on the right side of the pic.

Again, my apologies for the grainy pic. My camera just does not do well where the tractor is stored. I'll try and see if I can get some closer and more decent photos for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stanley D Pierson on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 10:06 am:

Thanks Don I will print a copie of this for my files.
STAN


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