Model T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Model T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Kelly on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 08:44 am:

How was the Model T revolutionary? How was it reformed to become better? How did people react to it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 09:11 am:

Mark

So many ways, in 1909 the T was instant success, by the early '20's, one-half of the cars on the road were Fords.

Until the revolution, only the elite had pleasure cars. Henry made his for the populace.

With the afFORDabilty....everyone could be riding in an auto, instead of a horse and buggy,....even pretty girls :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum - Webster Groves, Mo on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 11:34 am:

The Model T ended the era of the the horse. For about the same cost of a team and a wagon you could have a car that when not needed did not need the daily maintenance that horses do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 11:47 am:

The Model T was not the first car, and likely not the best made at the time, however it was reliable, and the parts were interchangeable and easy to replace. Even the common person could maintain it. The thing which was different about the Model T was the low price made possible by the production line. The other cars made at the time were assembled individualy with parts brought to a central point and assembled there. Many parts were hand fitted and difficult to replace if problems occured later. The parts would need to be custom fitted to the car. The Model T was different. The parts were interchangeable, and easy to repair or replace when problems happened.

So, several things about the Model T which made it desireable, were: Easy to buy, because of the low price and many dealerships through the world, parts easy to find, and easy to replace,
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john mann on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 11:49 am:

In my opinion, henry and his model T are directly responsible for ushering in an era of unheard of prosperity in America, not to mention, freeing up the masses to travel like they'd never had the opportunity to travel before. If you were raised in a blue collar household, one way or another, you owe mr. ford a debt of gratitude. He showed an entire planet the way. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dennis Fleming on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 12:14 pm:

The Model T was the average mans Pride and Joy.
Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dennis Fleming on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 12:15 pm:

And Women Also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 12:53 pm:

Dennis,
Do you have any more information on this great photo?
-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 01:19 pm:

Henry Ford is incorrectly attributed to the invention of the automobile. While he did not invent the automobile or even mass production, he did develop revolutionary techniques in mass production for the automobile manufacturing industry, in which the automobile was transported along an assembly line to the parts and assemblers instead of the parts being transported to each individual automobile, which resulted in the manufacturing of tremendous quantities of affordable automobiles to meet the demands of the masses. The more efficient this process became, the more automobiles were produced, resulting in an ever cheaper price so that virtually everyone could eventually own one. Until Henry Ford, automobiles were a plaything for only the very rich. Now every man could own the "Universal Car".

In 18 years over 15 million Model T's were made and along with them came a network of paved roads connecting town to town, direction signs, road maps, motels (hotels for motorists), gas stations and service stations. This not only put Americans on wheels, but for the first time, allowed the masses to explore their country, beyond the boundaries of their home towns, which would not have occurred without Henry Ford and his Model T. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 04:02 pm:

Very good question Mark. With just 2 posts, I see that you are a new member. Welcome aboard. If you want to find out about Model T's, this is the place to come. I noticed that you asked essentially the same question in another thread you started after this one, "Model T Revolution". If you ask the question only once, it will be easier for you, as you will be able to find all of the answers posted in one thread instead of having to look up all the answer in several threads. I can't tell how old you are by your profile. Do you have a Model T or considering getting one? Are you doing a school project? A report, or are you writing a book or simply interested in the subject. Again, Mark, welcome. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 05:11 pm:

I've always known that Ford didn't invent the automobile, nor mass production. However, he didn't come up with the idea of the efficient process of how the cars were assembled, either. Experts in time-study applied the methods to the automobile making process.

1/3'rd of ALL model T's were produced in the final 3 years of production.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dennis Fleming on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 07:08 pm:

Don,
All I can tell you is this photo was given to me by a gentleman with the last name Ford. He has told me the people in the photo are his ancesters and are all Fords.The title of the photo is" Four Fords in a Ford".I believe the family is from Indiana and from the looks of the photo the car is setting on a tract of some kind. Maybe the BRICKYARD??? That is all I know.
Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 08:05 pm:

Hi Dennis,
Thanks for getting back to us.
I'll tile MY copy of this photo "Four Ford's in a Ford" --that works for me
-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 08:38 pm:

Dennis,

On Thursday August 20, 2009 at 9:40 PM you gave us the following information:

"This is a photo of four Fords in a Ford. Front seat is Edward and Dora Ford and the back seat is Maxwell and Mabel Ford. I dont know much about the photo except the photo was given to me by a grandson Tom Ford who lives here in Luray VA. He said this photo was taken at a race track some where in the mid west. My question is what year is this car?"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 08:50 pm:

Dora and Mabel Ford were sisters and comprised half of the Vaudeville dance team The Four Fords. Dora was the mother of Roy Benson a famous magician born in France in 1914.

Mabel Ford was Born in Ohio on January 1st, 1888 to John William Ford and Miriam Landau Ford. She was the youngest of 5 children. They were all taught to dance as soon as they were able to walk. Mable Ford made up 1/4 of famous Vaudeville tap dance team called The Four Fords which was made up of Max Ford, Edwin Ford, Dora Ford and Mabel Ford. The Four Fords were billed 2nd only to Sarah Bernhardt. They broke up in 1913 but the Ford Sisters continued to tour the US and Canada on the Palace and Orpheun circuits and toured Europe from 1914 - 1916. They came home and continued to top bills for another 10 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dennis Fleming on Sunday, November 13, 2011 - 09:48 am:

Tom Ford, the gentleman that lives near me and gave me a copy of the photo also said the group pictured were in Vaudeville. That is cool!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, November 13, 2011 - 06:58 pm:

Two of those people in that car I recognize from other Ford photos. I think they are in the one of the new '15 Coupelet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Kelly on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 04:31 pm:

School Project. 2000 words. If any of you have websites of newspapers anounncing the model t or advertising it, that would be great. Sometimes there are things you can't find on google. thanks again even for the responses. Background helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 05:02 pm:

Mark,
Try the encyclopedia section found on the home page of this website. It's chock full of good information. Bruce and Trent have included scans of original Ford advertizing, a history of the Ford Motor company and many other items.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By CharlieB Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 05:58 pm:

Frankly, in my opinion, the T became revolutionary as time passed. There were one or two revolutionary innovations very early on. Vanadium steel and the single cast (en-block) engine come to mind. The planetary was used on a previous model so that's kind of out. Assembly line and lower pricing also developed over time. Henry just had a good seller in the beginning and he learned how to make it pay. The car wasn't really a revolution in auto manufacturing. It became one over the years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 06:22 pm:

Ike, "You should go see that magician performing at the city auditorium. He can make a horse disappear."

Mike, "That's nothing. Henry Ford made 65 million of 'em disappear."

:-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 09:26 pm:

I was thinking about this subject as I was traveling around town recently. I realized that the supermarket, the mall, all fast food places, and many other things we take for granted are all dependant on the automobile. Henry no doubt started a revolution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker -- NW Ark. on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 10:38 pm:

Just as the automobile made the horse obsolete as a means of transportation, something else will come along to make the automobile obsolete. Maybe in our lifetimes, maybe not, but it will happen.

I often wonder what it will be and think about what a revelation it will be. Imagine seeing whatever it is, just as folks a hundred years ago saw the first automobiles come to their towns.

Every time I see a significant work of architecture torn down to make room for another parking lot, I think about this. The buildings being torn down to make the space available are gone forever. We are building highways, parking lots, and parking garages as fast as we can afford them, but they are for only a temporary use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 12:30 am:

The changing transportation scene includes railroads. For all the miles of track now in use, there are probably more miles abandoned. The Midland Valley ran from Wichita to Fort Smith. It's gone and all the tracks have been taken up. The Frisco ran from northeast to southwest here. It's gone and all the tracks have been taken up. The Missouri Pacific ran east to west across southern Kansas. It's gone and all the tracks have been taken up. All over the country there are towns that have an old station, but no railroad, and even more where the station is gone too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley near Melboune Australia on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 03:47 am:

It is my belief that the T was revolutionary, not so much because of any one factor, but as a union of many factors.
George Stephenson built the 'revolutionary' locomotive known as "The Rocket" If you examine it carefully, virtually every aspect of that engine was based on ideas and methods already tried. What Stephenson did was to build a locomotive embodying all of those features into one machine, making it a very advanced vehicle for its day.

So too, most of the engineering of the T had been tried out before, but Henry embodied all of those features into his one machine. That made the first T a very advanced vehicle for its day. The design of the car alone, though, might not have been enough. I believe that Ford's innovative construction methods that lead to the almost constant lowering of price were a very important part of the mix. Because of the Ford, the motor car was a device available to a huge market, not just the fortunate few.

The Ford ideal of building as high a quality as possible at as low a price as possible, must surely also be another reason for the success. Before the T most manufacturers were driven by the ideal of a high profit per vehicle built, I believe that Henry was responsible for changing that.

I am sure other forum members can add to the above, but rather than the car itself being 'revolutionary', it was the whole organisation around the car that brought that about.

Dane.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 08:43 am:

Ford said he wanted to build a car for the masses. He did that. It was the first car that was cheap enough for the average person to buy. Thats what made it revolutionary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 10:38 am:

"Ford said he wanted to build a car for the masses. He did that. It was the first car that was cheap enough for the average person to buy. Thats what made it revolutionary."

Actually, the Model T wasn't the first car for the masses. Ransom Olds beat him to it. He had the lightweight, inexpensive Curved Dash Oldsmobile on the market for a couple of years before the Ford Motor Company was formed. It was a runaway success. I'd argue that it set the tone for the feasibility of and demand for, a car for the masses. In 1904, he started the REO Motor Motor Car Company and began producing cars that were very competitive with the early Fords in both price and performance. For 1909, REO offered a one-cylinder roadster at $500 and a two-cylinder with either a touring or roadster body for $1000. The two-cylinder was faster, more comfortable and every bit as reliable as the Model T. The If I recall correctly, REO outsold Ford every year through 1910, but they lacked the dealer network and production capacity to compete after that and dropped the lightweight cars from their line in favor of larger, more expensive models. I don't believe that Olds had a big of a vision as Ford did.

So,I'd give the edge to Ford in production and business acumen. I think that Ford's aggressiveness in setting up a vast network of dealers that effectively put the cars and parts support in every town was a major key to the success of the T. In my mind, the other key was production. Ford's production methods were innovative in many areas, but I feel that their greatest success came from constantly improving the design without losing parts interchangeability. As evidenced by all of the "bitsa" cars out there, a part from any year T will fit nearly any other year too. Sticking to the same basic design for an eighteen year production run provided a great economy in engineering, allowing Ford to focus on improving efficiency of production rather than designing a whole new car every year or two. Volkswagen used the same theory with the Beetle.


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