Clayton paddison and Chris Becker build a speedster in 6 months #2

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Clayton paddison and Chris Becker build a speedster in 6 months #2
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By chris becker on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 11:18 pm:

*UPDATE*
The Spare Tire Carrier is FINISHED!!!

That is right all, The carrier is finally finished....and probably way over built, but so what

Chris tackled the last of the bracing Saturday morning got it all bolted in place...now it is stout enough to hold me up...standing on the spare







The inner bracing ties and triangulates the spare tire carrier to the rear cross member...



Chris also took advantage of the nice weather we had Sunday to get a few outside photos for our forum audience....




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy J Williams on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 12:33 am:

Looks good. I rather have something over built than under built.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 04:42 am:

That's going to be quite a rig when you guys get done. We old guys could learn a lot from your creativity. You guys would have a ball with this thing.

There's absolutely nothing 'stock' about it. Trying to repair anything is a 'research project' because like your car, it's one of a kind. It looked like this when it was new. Not even the rear wheel wells are 'stock'.

Model T guys, there's a plus to this. Now that my inner "Hot Rodder" as this thing to play with, 'Lizzie', My 27 Tudor, will forever remain one of 'Henry's own'.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By chris becker on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 10:43 am:

Thanks Dennis. Seeing as Clayton and I built this thing from all of our spare parts as Christmas gift for my dad. We are really happy with the way it's turning out. Nice looking little custom there. Like you Dennis our 1919 touring will remain just as old Henry made it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By chris becker on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 11:12 am:

Tim, I agree with you. Last thing I wanted to see was those dual spares skipping down the highway on our way to Bonneville!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bernard from San Buenaventura, Calif on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 12:55 pm:

I've been following this built on the H.A.M.B. and it's right up my alley and goes a bit in the direction of what I am doing, sort of. That is to say, among this remarkable built there are a few things I don't like and I will mention them, not to be a party pooper, but to get some feedback.

1) The plywood.
It may be a personal thing, but how much more money and effort would it have taken to buy some reclaimed (="old") hardwood and use that as the base. I have been dealing with the same issue on my Speedster, and in my not so humble opinion the old hardwood makes all the difference when it comes to present a car that was built in period versus 90 years later). It's a bit like a Shelby Cobra. If you're not sure if it's real or a fake, you don't just look at the details; you'll find out if its body is alloy or fiberglass. If it's alloy, you really have to scratch your head. Same with a 1910s car. There was no plywood floor board on any of those, so it's a dead giveaway.

2) The fiberglass.
I understand perfectly why you guys went the fiberglass route, and that job you did is truly breathtaking. Seriously. But looking at the steel skeleton you built for the fenders (pure art!), the rather flat top surfaces, and calculating the enormous effort you had to put into making these fenders from glass, you might as well have used some steel sheets. Am I wrong?

3) The stance.
While even the Mercer looks low, your car is so low that the pan is asking to be ripped off.

4) The upholstery.
Can there be anything else than leather?

5) The dashboard.
You guys basically started from scratch. I understand that you had these genuine old seats, which is why making ones that look the unique Racebout seats didn't make sense, but I wonder why you didn't make an dashboard that is angled like that of the Mercer? Did you consider doing that and it was simply not practical because of the way the pedals are mounted?

I hope you take this the right way. I know that you got nothing but encouragement from fellow enthusiasts, and I admire what you've been doing every bit as much, so I hope you will not be upset that somebody brings up a few points that made me wonder why.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 05:27 pm:

Bernard,

No offense taken in the least. There are reasons for everything on this car...some more thought out then others, but all planned out just the same.

1) Plywood- While using older hardwood would have been preferred to make this car perfectly period, the reason for the use of plywood was time. If this car had been a 2 or 3 year build and we had scrutinized correctness, I would have insisted on building the body as it would have been before 1912. In reality Chris and I were racing the clock to build this entire car in just 6 months and desperately trying to have the car finished in time to present to Chris's Father, Bill as his Christmas gift from the us. Sadly Bill passed away in October last year and never sough his "toy". After his passing Chris and I slowed down a little on the schedule. Plywood was simple, strong, and readily available in big sheets at the local Home Depot.

2)Fiberglass - While a little on the unothodox side, the glass fenders do have a story behind them.
Chris and I did the fenders in this fashion because I had talked about doing a T in fiber glass (including the fenders) much like a Corvette. Bill had seen the idea (cardboard sealed with glass) in use on my father's R/C ship models and was fascinated by it and if it could be applied in a full-size application like the T I had talked about. When I originally planned to make a set for my roadster, he couldn't wait to see how it all would work.

Since he passed away before we could make a set together, I figured the "Special" was the perfect "guinea pig"

....after all, this car was for him.

3)Stance - When Chris and I started this car, we both agreed it should be low, but we also had to keep in mind Bill's limited mobility at the time which prompted this car's creation. Since this was his "toy" and we wanted him to actually be able to drive it comfortably, we decided on the current lowering style and stance to get the car as low as possible to allow him to easily get in and out of the car. While it is on the low side and scraping the hogshead is a threat, I have seen several other T's that were equally as low that have never suffered that issue.

4)Upholstery - The "Special" was originally intended to be upholstered in either leather or a vinyl to simulate leather, but in the effort of time and finance, we opted for some durable canvas.

5)Dashboard - While this car does resemble and mimic the legendary Mercer Type 35J raceabout, it was never intended to be a Mercer clone. The Mercer "look" was more of a theme or a guid line to give Bill's "toy" the feel and spirit of a Type 35J...which was the subject of one of Bill's favorite stories and one his most favorite rides of all time. As a young man, he was privileged to get a ride in the '13 Type 35J that now resides in the Harrah Auto Collection in Reno. The mechanic who had been asked to take Bill for a spin, took him for a "good ride" ...Opening up the Mercer to well over 90 mph on I-80 before putting the car into a full 4-wheel power slide down in the industrial area of Sparks, NV. It was a ride Bill would never forget and this was what we aimed to recapture for him.

The angled cowl/dash much like the Mercer was originally part of the design, but was later removed due to conflicts with the pedals and leg room for Bill which was far more important. In that light, I took a design cue from his favorite car, his 1909 Brush runabout and patterned the body after this instead...to make him feel more "at home" in the new "Special".

As I said before, no offense taken. It never hurts to ask a question that makes you scratch your head a bit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By chris becker on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 10:57 pm:

Quick update:

Well we made up a front license plate bracket...



We didn't like the way the hood sides turned out before...We moved the hinge line on the hood sides down about 2.5" I think it make things look more in proportion...
New pattern for the monocle windshield...




New pattern for the monocle windshield...



Well we keep making progress hope to tear it apart for paint before Christmas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By chris becker on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 11:02 pm:







Couple more views of the aforementioned parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 03:42 am:

Keep em coming. I'm sure I'm not the only one that's interested in seeing how this turns out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 12:07 pm:

We certainly will Dennis!

You are not the only one interested in seeing how this comes out.....Chris and I are VERY interested ;)


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