What I learned today in Georgia - T related

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: What I learned today in Georgia - T related
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom J. Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 04:03 pm:

My missus and I are down in Georgia this week. Since her legs are particularly bad, I paid for the 90 minute tour and rode around Savannah in a bus. I made a few discoveries today.

The driver told me Henry Ford lived for a brief time in Savannah and this is where he designed and assembled his first Model T. She even showed me the building off Liberty street where this all happened.

She also pointed out the statue of a woman waving a towel. The story on that one was the woman "was nuts" and she spent some forty some odd years waving at ships. The funny thing is that another driver told me a completely different story about the statue to point where my wife is wrestling me for the computer so she can find out the real story of the girl with the towel.

I can't wait to see what I find out tomorrow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - SE Georgia on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 04:21 pm:

Never heard the Henry Ford story. Sounds bogus to me. There may a grain of truth to it. Henry Ford did own the Ford Plantation in Richmond Hill, which is just south of Savannah. I forget what it was all about. Trying to grow rubber trees for tires or growing soybeans for coil cases or steering wheels or some other experimental something that never really came to fruition. It is now an expensive resort for those who like to play golf. So, Henry did indeed spend some time near Savannah, but I find it hard to believe he built a car there.

As for the waving girl, the story I always heard was she was in love with some sailor who promised to come back and marry her, so she personally greeted every ship that came up the Savannah River to port. He never returned. She never married. I have no idea if the story is true, but there's probably more truth to it than Henry building a Model T in Savannah.

Hal
(Who lived there for 5 years and still lives only 75 miles away.)

PS, you should try the pizza at Vinnie van GoGo's in City Market. Good stuff! We sometimes drive that 75 miles to eat there. Don't look for any atmosphere. It's a hole in the wall, but the pizza is GREAT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St. Louis MO on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 05:27 pm:

Try this version:

http://gosoutheast.about.com/od/savannahgaattractions/a/waving_girl.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 07:20 pm:

Tom
For an ACCURATE account of Henry and Clara Fords tenure at Richmond Hill, Georgia get the book "The Henry Ford Era at Richmond hill Georgia" by Franklin and Lucy Long. ISBN 0-9667610-0-6. Copies can be obtained from Dr. and Mrs F. Leslie Long 186 Lincoln Circle, Richmond Hill, Georgia 31324.
It is a great book with complete details and many photographs.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom J. Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 08:44 pm:

Hal, Dick, and Ron,
After I got back from dinner, I e-mailed the tour company and asked if they can provide any further documentation. I'll be surprised if I get an answer.

Hal,
In regards to food, we ate lunch at the Shrimp Factory and I have to admit they've guzzied up the place since I was there 30 years ago. I also notice the navy no longer ties up next to the restaurants. Due to the parking situation, Sue and I walked from the hotel to a restaurant on the main street for dinner. It's raining so we didn't walk far. My wife told me Paula Dean has a restaurant on the block behind our hotel. When I walked by, I could hear my arteries clicking shut.

Dick,
Thanks for the website. I wonder how the lady managed to get schooled or have some semblance of a life. If the Asian container ships are any indication, this is a busy port.

Ron,
I have to bone up on Richmond Hill. For many years the Ford Museum had a mahogany model of the mansion. The pattern makers created it so that Clara could propose furniture layouts while she was up at Fairlane. They displayed it next to the dollhouses.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve in Tennessee on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 08:47 pm:

Story I heard was that her clothes line broke...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John W. Oder on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 09:21 pm:

Take the river boat tour up and down the river Tom - we did last year and enjoyed it.

J.O.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 09:23 pm:

I have spent months in Savannah while supervising work at Gulfstream on various aircraft projects. My favorite restaurant in Savannah is Saigon (link here):

http://www.allmenus.com/ga/savannah/27282-saigon/menu/

Second favorite is the Pink House (link):
http://www.frommers.com/destinations/savannah/D35841.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 09:33 pm:

Tom,

Be sure you see Fort Pulaski, just out of town. If I remember correctly, Robert E. Lee had a hand in building it when he was with the US Army. (That was before the later trouble.)

My favorite part of Savannah is (are?) the squares in the original Oglethorpe part of town.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - SE Georgia on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 09:41 pm:

Paula Deen's restaurant is called The Lady and Sons. It's been a while since I've eaten there. It was OK, but no better than my wife's or my Mom's cooking. Wasn't a lot of atmosphere there either. There's another place called Mrs. Wilkes' Boarding House. Mrs. Wilkes is no longer with us, but she used to say if Colonel Sanders had her fried chicken recipe, he'd have been a general.

After reading Ron's comments, I did a little research on Richmond Hill and the Ford Plantation. Seems it was more a Winter home for Henry and Clara, but he did a lot of philanthropic work in the community, including building some schools and churches. He also built a bakery for a Mr. Wommble to experiment with soy based baked goods. Mr. Wommble's grandson is now the proprietor of the Georgia Fruitcake Co. in Claxton, GA and is the man from which I acquired my HCCT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Manuel Voyages on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 10:51 pm:

Wasn't there a song [in the 1960s-70s] about a lady waiting for her sailor/lover to return?

I thought Ford had a winter/holiday house down there somewhere with all the other rich people?

Manuel in Oz


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 07:25 am:

Manuel,

The song you may be thinking of is "Brandi Your a Fine Girl" by the group called The Looking Glass.

It's about a young girl who is a waitress in a bar and waits her whole life for a salior to return who promised to marry her.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 12:39 pm:

Tom,

"...this is where he designed and assembled his first Model T..."

Get her name and address, or that of the tour company, and I'll send them a brochure on the Ford Piquette Plant. Where, (as I know you're aware), the first Model T really was designed and built.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 01:29 pm:

Henry Ford did work on a Model T at the Richmond Hill home, he & Jim Newton scoured all the local junkyards looking for a Model T to take back to the house to tear down & rebuild, but this was in 1938 not 1908!

The Richmond Hill Museum is a neat place to visit and has lots of Ford artifacts and is housed in a Ford built building.

Alot of my family is from the area, one of my uncles worked for a construction company that renovated Ford's mansion into the clubhouse. Last time I was up that way, he gave me some pieces of wood floor. Supposedly they came from one of the upper floor rooms of Ford's home.

It shares space with a brick from the Highland Park plant, piece of steel truss from the old B building at the Rouge, and several other Ford architectural pieces in my collection.

As for Paula Deen, she's all show and her food sucks. It's Southern Food designed for the masses who haven't grown up around 'good vittles'. If you want real Southern cooking, stop by my house at suppertime. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - SE Georgia on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 01:31 pm:

Savannah, probably like most other touristy cities, has a lot of these "Tours". Walking tours, carriage tours, bus tours, "Trolley" tours. I understand that the "Ghost" tours probably have to do a little fabrication, but for your general interest and historical tours, it's a shame they have to stoop to that level.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - SE Georgia on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 01:43 pm:

Luke,

Kinda like Cracker Barrel. Country cooking for those who don't know any better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom J. Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 08:18 pm:

I got two very nice replies from the tour company today and learned the location of the building. No jokes, it's on Bull Street.



The gent who replied wrote back twice within two hours. The first reply suggested some further research should be done by me and he referenced the local museums and historical societies.

His second reply gave me the address of the building. Here's a Google photo and I'm thinking that at best this may have been a dealership at one time but not the birthplace of our Ts.

Some deja vu from home. My son told me that Dearborn is very flooded in places. The Rouge river by Fairlane is one of these places. The Southfield expressway is also closed in Dearborn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom J. Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 08:21 pm:

I got two very nice replies from the tour company today and learned the location of the building. No jokes, it's on Bull Street.



The gent who replied wrote back twice within two hours. The first reply suggested some further research should be done by me and he referenced the local museums and historical societies.

His second reply gave me the address of the building. Here's a Google photo and I'm thinking that at best this may have been a dealership at one time but not the birthplace of our Ts.

Some deja vu from home. My son told me that Dearborn is very flooded in places. The Rouge river by Fairlane is one of these places. The Southfield expressway is also closed in Dearborn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Manuel Voyages on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 08:29 pm:

I had forgotten about that song Dennis.
Have not heard it for a loong time.

Manuel in Oz


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