Magnet testing for North and South

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Magnet testing for North and South
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 05:32 pm:

OK l guess that title says it all except for what l need to look for.
I've given the magnets a good hard WHACK with the hammer and broken only 3, so l'll assume that the rest are ok to use.

I'll buy a cheap compass today and then do.......

If l hold the magnets with the V upwards, then place the compass on the left side of the top, will the magnet point to either north or south, then on the right of the top of the V, south or north.

Is it that easy ????

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 06:08 pm:

In the US southern magnets are gray and northern magnets are blue and only recently have unlike poles begun to attract one another.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 07:00 pm:

Pictures can show it....








Ted: I liked that one :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Stephan on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 07:57 pm:

Just read the book tonight... arrainge the magnets on a board, or assembled loosley on the flywheel. None of the magnets should be attracted to each other. If they are, flip that one over to reverse the polarity. NN,SS,NN,SS etc... ws


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 09:15 am:

"Bugga" - l have paint written the opposites, now l see l'll re do them again tomorrow.

Thank you.

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 10:00 am:

Bills suggestion on magnet arrangement has always been the simplest way to arrange the magnets for me. As long as the magnets dont attract each other its correct. And as always read the book. Everytime I build a transmission I 'refresh' my memory and read the instructions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 05:25 pm:

OK, one final question, magnet weights, mine range from 383 grams to 403 grams, thats only 20 grams ( not much in the scheme of things ) variance, should or does anyone, balance the flywheel more by standardizing the magnet weight ???

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 07:36 pm:

David
In my opinion you balance the completely rebuilt flywheel and get rid of all those assembled variances.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 03:39 pm:

OK, thank you Ron.

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 07:23 pm:

Dan, did you reverse the polarity, in your compass needle, or did you mark the ends of the magnets wrong, because your needle is reversed. Herm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 09:23 pm:

The polarity of the magnets as assembled from the factory was North to North and South to South, so every other magnet was opposite polarity. When you replace the ones that were broken, you need to find out which polarity they were so you will replace with the right polarity. When you recharge them they should be charged the same polarity as they were before. If you reverse the polarity, they won't retain the charge.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 09:48 pm:

Your right Herman. It is very easy to get the polarity of the compass reversed and just as easy to reverse it back to normal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher Lang - Brentwood Bay, BC on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 09:59 pm:

Meh, the earth's field flips, it's all relative.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 01:01 am:

I have succesfully ballanced a complete T flywheel on a regular wheel balancing device. Most of these have centering cones that will ensure centering the flywheel.
You will probably not be able to position the flywheel correct so you can do dynamic and static balancing as is, but with some fidling you may end up with both dynamic and static balanced flywheel.
Remember that where the device says you should add weight, you should remove weight 180 degrees opposite :-)
Then you can make the 3 gears weigh the same by turning i little off in a lathe so they weigh the same.
You can't imagine the difference and your bearings will love you :-)
I had some pictures from where I did it, but I can't find them now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 02:18 am:

David,
When balancing any muliples of similar components standard practise is to match weigh them. The closer they are to matched to start with, the less trouble you will have later when balancing the whole.

20 grams may not seem much but it is heading towards an ounce. Get two or three heavy ones on one side of the flywheel and you can see why T flywheels have those big holes drilled in them. What I don't get is they are drilled and then the magnets are added afterwards.

Balancing the triple gears is good practise also.
This re-inforces my belief that magnets should also be matched. 20 grams difference between triple gears is huge. Having that difference flopping about in the circles described by the magnets magnifies any out-of-balance.

All of this is just my interpretation. My old time engine re-metaller always had me match weigh
bare rods before pouring new bearings, making balancing the finished rods much easier. It sort of makes sense to keep things in order to start with to make the job easier at the end.

I have just finished balancing a transmission for a club member. By changing the relative position of the clutch driven plate on the brake drum, I could almost eliminate having to take any metal off to static balance the assembly. This is much preferable to grinding away on a more out-of-balance assembly.

Just my thoughts. Allan from down under.


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