Ford related San Francisco 1940

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Ford related San Francisco 1940
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 11:53 pm:

Here is a group of pictures with a story about a visit to San Francisco. Scroll down all the way and see who wrote the story.
Norm
http://researchmaniacs.com/SanFrancisco/Visiting1940.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 12:02 am:

Very interesting, but I'm not so sure it's the same Henry. Henry was a non drinker, and the writing style doesn't match Ford's very well.

Wish they were able to figure out a date in 1940 when this took place.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 12:32 am:

I'm suspicious of the Ford attribution too. The photos have a professional look about them, and the writing style suggests a magazine story by a travel writer. Given the abundance of bogus internet postings, I suspect somebody took a magazine article and stuck Henry Ford's name on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 04:20 am:

It almost certainly is not written by 'our' Henry Ford. The style of writing is too different (compare My Life and Work, and news reports of the period). Plus, it is my understanding that Henry Ford did not drink (can someone confirm that?) - so he would hardly have 'gone to cocktails' or ordered wine with dinner, and joked that the waiter had been drinking.
John Stokes
New Zealand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 01:57 pm:

Note: He said you could buy a bottle of wine, not that he bought one.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 08:12 pm:

If this 1940, then model Ts must have been run off the road by this time....or they are relegated to back roads and farms. They are only 13+ years old at this time. I drove my '26 Roadster over the Golden Gate...once is enough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 09:10 pm:

I did not live in San Francisco in 1940, but in the Los Angeles area. There were 2 Model T tourings which went by my house every day, and I would see others from time to time. About like any other car 13 years old. There were many newer cars, but still many Model A's and a few Model T's being driven as daily drivers. In fact a few years later when the Model T Ford clubs and Model A Ford clubs were first formed, in 1957, we had a joint tour from San Fernando to Lake Isabella (east of Bakersfield). We actually drove the cars over the grapevine all the way. No trailering in those days.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 10:02 am:

When you get to a certain age everything reminds you of something else. Norm's mention of driving over the Grapevine made me think of my dad's "drag race" with a Model A. We were still in the city, not even near the Ridge Route yet, headed for camping in the mountains. We were headed north on Sepulveda Boulevard in West L.A. in the '41 Plymouth and stopped for a red light at Wilshire, across from the National Cemetery. A guy in a Model A coupe pulled up in the right lane beside us. I don't know if the A wanted to stall, or what, but the guy revved his engine a little. My little brother and I decided he wanted to race, and told Dad he had to beat the Model A. If you knew Dad, you'd appreciate the humor in that. He was Mr. Low Key, one of the least likely to race people on the planet. But the light changed and we took off. Dad didn't try to burn rubber or speed shift, but he did tromp down the footfeed. The poor old Plymouth was hauling two adults and a couple of kids plus all our camping equipment and supplies, and the last we saw of the A he was far ahead of us, heading up Sepulveda toward the pass. I'll have to ask my brother if he remembers this little adventure.


The old Plymouth at Cow Creek, 1946


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 10:55 am:

When I was deep into Model Ts in 1951, there was a '26 roadster PU that passed daily by my junior high school in San Jose, CA. It was driven by an old gent with a missing left leg. He rigged up an outside lever with a shaft extending through the body to the low-high pedal. This was the only active T in town that I knew of...except a bunch on ranches/farms, and of course, the T club folks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 11:14 am:

The HCCA local club in the bay area has an annual tour called the three bridges tour. Yes they go over all three bridges in pre 1916 cars.


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