Timing cover year ???

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Timing cover year ???
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 04:12 pm:

Can anyone identify what year this timing cover is from, it has no recess for a seal either in back or front, no cast in lettering/numbering.

thanks in advance David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Brownsburg,In. on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 04:34 pm:

1911?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 05:15 pm:

Thank you Jack.

cheers David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 11:07 pm:

On the timer covers before 1912 the timer used was not the roller timer you have pictured. The 2 piece timer was used on those cars and the timer was thus held in place by the timer brush. These timer covers are hard to spot with the naked eye but they can be. Remove the timer and look behind it and measure the inside diameter of the cavity which you are using for the timer. On the early covers the so-called timer cavity was not machined to an exact diameter of 3.004 but mainly just not machined. The cavity was "as cast" with a casting radius in the corners of the "timer cavity". It will typically measure larger than the 3.004 and the roller timer being just under 3.000 will fit loosy goosy in the cavity. There is no secondary place for the typical neoprene oil seal to be installed into and in fact the main problem with the early timer cover when you attempt to use the later timer is that the "as cast" cavity is not precision located with regard to the camshaft hole since that cavity was just to hold a felt donut seal behind the back half of the 2 piece timer. Does this make sense? The first timer to not be held in place by the brush was the so-called "oiler timer" of very late 1911/early 1912 vintage. The next timer was the aluminum timer and all timers after the oiler timer were held in place by the spring arm to the timer cover bolt as you have pictured. If the car is a pre 1912 car and you want to run a later timer on it you will need to find a motor front timer cover that is 1912 or later that has the precision machined and precision centered hole for this later timer. Remember that the early (1911 and earlier) timer cover does not have the hole located absolutely concentric with the cam shaft center since with the 2 piece timer it didn't have to be. It only had to be basically centered and the "as cast" cavity only had to hold a felt donut - not a timer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Saturday, December 03, 2011 - 01:08 am:

And the spring tensioner instead of a bolt pre 1912?


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration