No heat in the T?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: No heat in the T?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle USA!!! on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 11:17 am:




http://www.ebay.com/itm/MODEL-T-FORD-NOS-ARVIN-MANIFOLD-FLOOR-HEATER-FITS-ALL-YEARS-ORIGINAL-BOX-/220900691941?hash=item336eb50fe5&item=220900691941&pt=Vintage_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&vxp=mtr

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http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ford-Model-T-Accessory-Heater-Pipe-/250942322733?hash=item3a6d53f82d&item=250942322733&pt=Vintage_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&vxp=mtr


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http://www.ebay.com/itm/Model-A-Model-T-Style-Antique-Auto-Buggy-Heater-/230710142437?hash=item35b76565e5&item=230710142437&pt=Vintage_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&vxp=mtr

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 11:35 am:

Interesting that the least effective has the highest bid.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez - Templeton, CA on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 02:02 pm:

The foot warmer was used in offices, cars and any where one needed a space heater. My Dad once told me that when he visited the Pullman Car factory in the 1940's, he watched the custodian come around with a bucket of coals from the furnace room and recharge them to keep the office workers feet warm in the winter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 02:02 pm:

Steve,

I agree. We have one of the third kind but I've never used it. We have one similar to number 2 in our Tudor and it really works quite well.

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum - Webster Groves, Mo on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 02:11 pm:

I have a foot warmer and it really works. During the St. Louis Christmas parade on Thanksgiving I had it fired up at my wife's feet, then we put a blanket on our laps over the warmer and we were nice and cozy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode - Onalaska, WA, USA on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 02:11 pm:

The more effective manifold heaters have a much larger heat exchanger then the original manifold.

This one is missing the sheet metal:



Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 06:44 pm:

Death traps for closed cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 09:05 pm:

Why do you make that statement, John ? I've been running the same heater as posted above (with all the correct tin in place) for the better part of 5 years now in our '19 Centerdoor and have never had any exhaust fumes problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 09:58 pm:

I agree Steve.......the air that blasts into the car is the same air that is funneled from the manifold anyway.
There's probably less crankcase fumes from the valve cover opening too....... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 10:10 pm:

We have one on our Tudor ( for five years) with no problem. The only problem would be if there was a significant manifold leak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Or on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 10:41 pm:

I think he meant the charcoal/ember heater.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks_-_Surf_City on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 10:41 pm:

Carbon monoxide detectors are sold by www.AircraftSpruce.com and other aviations supply houses.

from wiki:
Toxicity Main article: Carbon monoxide poisoning
Carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common type of fatal air poisoning in many countries.[19] Carbon monoxide is colourless, odorless, and tasteless, but highly toxic. It combines with hemoglobin to produce carboxyhemoglobin, which is ineffective for delivering oxygen to bodily tissues. Concentrations as low as 667 ppm may cause up to 50% of the body's hemoglobin to convert to carboxyhemoglobin.[20] A level of 50% carboxyhemoglobin may result in seizure, coma, and fatality. In the United States, the OSHA limits long-term workplace exposure levels above 50 ppm.[21] Within short time scales, carbon monoxide absorption is cumulative, since the half-life is about 5 h in fresh air (see main article).

The most common symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning may resemble other types of poisonings and infections, including symptoms such as headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, fatigue, and a feeling of weakness. Affected families often believe they are victims of food poisoning. Infants may be irritable and feed poorly. Neurological signs include confusion, disorientation, visual disturbance, syncope and seizures.[22]

Some descriptions of carbon monoxide poisoning include retinal hemorrhages, and an abnormal cherry-red blood hue.[23] In most clinical diagnoses these signs are seldom noticed.[22] One difficulty with the usefulness of this the effect is that carbon monoxide merely corrects what would otherwise be an unhealthy appearance, since the chief effect of removing deoxygenated hemoglobin is to make an asphyxiated person appear more normal, or a dead person appear more life-like, similar to the effect of red colorants in embalming fluid.

Carbon monoxide binds to other molecules such as myoglobin and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase. Exposures to carbon monoxide may cause significant damage to the heart and central nervous system, especially to the globus pallidus,[24] often with long-term sequelae. Carbon monoxide may have severe adverse effects on the fetus of a pregnant woman.[25]
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Be careful, ya' hear?

rdr
home again


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum - Webster Groves, Mo on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 11:43 pm:

Carbon monoxide on my touring is not a problem, even with the side curtains on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 01:50 am:

I don't think carbon monoxide poisoning would be much of a problem on my '25 coupe either. It ain't very tight! Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George - Cherry Hill New Jersey on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 06:47 am:

Actually a carbon monoxide sensor is a great idea for a T :-)

When I fist got the '15 it ran horrible and was known for the previous 20 years to be both a mule and a 2-mile special. After 2-miles it just wouldn't run :-):-) Bought it and got it home, wheeled it out of the garage to methodically work through it, eventually got it to idle smooth at the top of the driveway...or so I thought. Pleased as punch that I could hear just about every cylinder firing at minimum idle, I heard the garage door to the house and turned to smile my accomplishment to the missus.

She just shook her head and I asked why. "You may want to rethink what you are doing, the CO sensor up in the bedroom is wailing its' head off!" I didn't smell exhaust, there was no smoke, I was outside with the car and no eye burn...but was glad to have had that CO sensor as I would have just been dumb, fat, and happy that I got it running smooth! The future test for my tuning ability was to do it the same way, missus out of the house, and if the CO sensor stayed quiet, I figured I had success. :-):-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 08:38 am:

I have KUNKEL heater in my 26 touring, it has a flex pipe that surrounds the exhaust pipe starting about six inches back from the ex manifold. It has two registers, one in the front floor and one in the rear and a fresh air inlet that funnels air from behind the radiator. Works great!!


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