Oil stains

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Oil stains
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ervin Mims on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 01:21 pm:

What is the best way to remove oil stains from a concrete driveway without renting a pressure washer, my T is leaking bad.thank


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 01:22 pm:

A T never leaks oil. It just marks its territory.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Holcomb on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 01:26 pm:

Shout laundry detergent and a scrub brush.
Let it soak in awhile then scrub and wash with a hose. I haven't found anything that completely removes the stain, but this is the best so far.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa in Poulsbo, WA on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 01:26 pm:

Ervin,

Try an auto parts store or home improvement store and look for Driveway Cleaner. They do a pretty good job of leaching out the oil from cement.

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Berch on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 01:54 pm:

A friend of mine told me this.

Use what ever cleaning method gives you the best results and let it dry thoroughly.

Scoop up a cup full of Portland Cement powder and sprinkle it on the stain.

Grind it into the surface with your foot, like you would "oil dry".

Sweep off the cement dust with a broom.

His theory is that it masks the stain. I don't know if it works. I've never tried it but it sounds logical.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez - Templeton, CA on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 08:08 pm:

If you own a Model T, Why are you worried about oil stains? The rest of the drive way is the problem!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By CharlieB Toms River N.J. on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 08:13 pm:

One thing I learned early on in my T'ing: never stop in the driveway! The clickers out and the garage doors up as I approach. Let her do her thing on the old rug inside.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Orlando Ortega Jr. Portales, New Mexico on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 08:31 pm:

When it's nice out, I like parking my cars outside on the drive. I don't like oil stains all over my drive. I get out the bag of "all purpose safety absorbent", comes in a small bag from the auto parts store. It works great, but you have to rub it into the oil stains.

After I rub it in, I sweep it up and recycle it over and over again. Works great.

Orlando


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George - Cherry Hill New Jersey on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 08:50 pm:

Back in my days as a young fireman and later Truck Foreman...long before it became sensible to use epoxy finish on concrete floors, we found that all Fords still leaked, including the F-1000's of the era used mainly on the imported Canadian Engine Pumpers built by Thibault :-) Just something about Fords marking their territory.

Our fix was regular clay Kitty Litter and a concrete brick as the scrub brush! A covering and polish in deep with the 'brick', sweep it up and all that was left was a very faint outline, and in about a week the clay 'dust' had all tracked out of the pores and the floor was good as new as the dust apparently took what was left of the oil with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 09:55 pm:

Years ago I used muriatic acid to clean up the concrete after my brother's old beetle left its mark.

On smooth concrete I have used 3M citrus cleaner in an aerosol can. It worked on my garage floor (spilt oil during an oil change, what a mess!) It worked nicely.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David ONeal on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 09:29 am:

Spray the oil stain with carb cleaner and absorb it with a paper towel immediately. Works for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks_-_Surf_City on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 10:35 am:

A well tuned Model T leaks just enough gasoline to soak the oil down through the concrete automatically...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 11:39 am:

At our shop, we pour gasoline on the oil stain to loosen it up, then spread a 1/2" high layer of Kitty litter (the old fashioned, non clumping type) on the gasoline soaked oil stain and let it sit. The absorbent kitty litter (also referred to as "Oil Dry") will pull the oil out of the concrete and leave it pretty much stain free. Prior to sweeping up the Oil Dry, our mechanic scrubs the pile of oil dry over the stain with a 12" long 2" x 4" board to break down the small particles of clay into a powder that increases its' absorbency. It may require a couple of applications. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 12:03 pm:

Good advice above but Charlie does what I do. I just can't let Lizzy sit on the drive. Start up in the garage, back out down the drive, and stop in the street for warm up time. Take the clicker with me and we go straight into the garage and park astride the O.C.D. (Oil Containment Device).

She is going to drip and there is no breaking her of it. I only know of one T that doesn't drip and poor Tom has to oil the pedal shafts from the outside.

Cleaning oil drips is good to know about, but a long term solution is to catch them or live with them.

We have had posts in the past that sowed off the painting talents of our cars. Lizzy is quite a painter as long as the medium is oil. She will do an occasional water color too, but those are much easier to clean up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David ONeal on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 03:22 pm:

In one of my past posts on my WW1 Ambulance there are pictures that I posted of my oil catcher device that I built out of a cookie sheet. It works good, you can drive with it installed and it is barely visible. It keeps my concrete from almost all of the oil drips.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 03:35 pm:

I use a drip pan, and for the oil which does not get in the pan, I just let it pile up on the floor until I am ready to do some work on the car. Then I first back out the car, and take some sand from the yard and sprinkle on the oil and let it set for a while, then sweep it up and dispose of it. Then I use some liquid washing detergent on the oil and hose off while sweeping it with a broom or mop. When it is dry, the stain remains, but most of the oil is removed so I can crawl under the car and work on it. All this is inside the garage. I have a gravel drive, so I don't worry about oil that might get on the driveway. It just helps settle the dust.

By the way, it would be helpful if you are building a new garage to put a glazed finish on the concrete, preferably dark gray or black.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Money, Braidwood, IL on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 05:49 pm:

How many have cleaned their floors and then sealed with a paint like an epoxy? If so, what have you cleaned the floor with to help with adhesion?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mitch Owen on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 06:16 pm:

I use lacquer thinner and an old rag. Cuts the oil & grease pretty good and gets rid of the slick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 09:27 pm:

kitty litter will soak up a lot of the oil. I use solvent and a brush.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Friday, December 09, 2011 - 01:27 am:

I also use lacquer thinner. Quickly brush oil stain with lacquer thinner using a small wire brush and dry with paper towels. Let the paper towels dry out for a couple of days so there are no lacquer fumes. Do not use lacquer thinner around water heaters or open flame. Extreem fire hazard! Use chemical resistant gloves. Works great on outside driveways!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew K. Deckman on Friday, December 09, 2011 - 06:07 pm:

I have a friend that used, to work on cars alot. His drive was oil soaked. He retired 2 years ago and I went to visit a month ago and his drive looked brand new. I ask was it a new drive way or did he clean it. He said nope rain and sun cleared it up over time. So if you can wait it out nature will take care of it.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration