Who to contact to appraise '21 Model T coupe

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Who to contact to appraise '21 Model T coupe
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Melanie Benham on Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 07:20 pm:

Who would one contact to get an appraisel on
a 1921 Model T coupe in Texas?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 12:46 am:

Melanie.......if any appraiser you might get in Texas is on par with the one who evaluated the '19 touring T I bought on ebay save your money.
Post some photos here, check out the classifides>>> http://www.mtfca.com/showit1/index.html and check ebay completed auctions for some real world information....... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 01:03 am:

I haven't had a lot of cars appraised, but from my limited experience I agree that professional appraisers are sometimes a bit optimistic about what a car is worth. Craig's suggestions are on the mark.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Melanie Benham on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 06:01 am:

Well, my mother is in one state and I'm in another and it's time she sold the car. They purchased it about 15yrs ago, it needs to be restored and they never had time. I know what they paid but that means nothing at this point - it was in someones barn when they went to buy hay from them. I just need advise on where to begin. I have no photos and very limited info.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 06:22 am:

With the limited amount of information you can give us, I'd suggest starting here.
http://www.antiqueautoappraisers.com/
But... If you could get your mom or somebody to take a few good pictures of this car (front, side, back, engine, interior) and post them here, the wealth of information on this site is next to none.
An 'appraisal' is only as good as the market available. Whereas, a few well placed pictures here, opens the car up to the Model T community, world wide.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George - Cherry Hill New Jersey on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 06:35 am:

Melanie,

The best way to go about it is to shoot a bunch of pictures and post them here as this group can hone in fast based on pictures alone with an average of averages for what it would be worth to someone presently into T's.

E-bay 'works' but it takes just as much work to get a posting up correctly to bring in a best price, and a simple price listing usually goes for much less.

The next best is to offer where the car is located and then see if someone who is a regular here is willing to take a run over and take a look. Most will do so out of curiosity and brotherhood and the answer will always usually be 'fair' along with passing the word to others in the region. Barn fresh 'hasn'r run in years' can actually be all over the map and a good eye will help zero in on what might be real and possible. As pointed out, a professional appraiser who is not part of the hobby just takes a guess and looks at what others have sold for...which may not be in the same class.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 06:37 am:

Location is important, but anyway, here are a couple of examples:
A non running 1919 coupe with a seemingly good body but modified in the rear end and with an uncertain mechanical condition didn't sell at eBay for $4000, but sold later to a poster here (Illinois): http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/247634.html?1322981371
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/VERY-RESTORABLE-1919-FORD-MODEL-T-PICK-UP-TRUCK-N O-RESERVE-/200675868767

A 1923 coupe, unrestored body but with the mechanicals restored for $5000 in recent years sold for $5101 at ebay saturday (california): http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Model-T-Ford-1923-Coupe-/170736773271?pt=US_Cars_ Trucks&hash=item27c0b46897

So your mothers coupe would likely sell for less than the examples above if it's in typical barn condition. Most critical for the price of an early closed car is the condition of the body wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 08:59 am:

What year did the coupe doors change the way they opened?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 09:33 am:

Front hinged doors came in august 1923, with the 1924 model (high radiator)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 10:06 am:

There is a '20 Coupe listed on ebay with the doors opening at the rear.It has RH drive. Ebay 260909425376


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 10:11 am:

Melanie, where are you in Texas? Where is the car? If we knew that we could probably find you some one close by to take a look at the car. It's a long way from El Paso to Corpus Christi and there is a lot of Texas in between. I've bought and sold a few Model T's over the years and my best guess is this: If the car is complete and not particularly rusty, ie; no big rust holes or fenders falling off, doors off and in a corner etc., the car is worth from 3 to 6 thousand dollars. The mechanics of the car are not overly important as they will be rebuilt by the new owner anyway. Same with tires, they are probably not driveable. If you can get me one picture (stanhowemt(at)aol.com) I will try to get you some better idea of what it is worth. Might even be able to find you a buyer. There is quite a bit of interest in those coupes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker -- NW Ark. on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 10:29 am:

Richard -- That car's front-hinged doors, high radiator/hood/cowl and attached turtle are typical of '24-5 Coupes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 11:38 am:

Mike,
That's what I was thinking. I have a '20 coupe with the doors hinges at the back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 11:51 am:

Ross Lilleker,

He restores, repairs, buys and trades Model T Fords and Model A as well.

979-218-4083

sales@mrmodelt.com

8437 Turkey Creek Rd

College Station, Texas 77845

You can also find him on the web.

http://www.mrmodelt.com/lilleker_antique_auto_home.htm

Another good source are the Neunhoffers in Kerrville, TX

Julius R Neunhoffer Jr
2505 Lowerturtle Creek Road
Kerrville, TX 78028


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 12:28 pm:

Adding to Ted's last item:

(830) 257-8168

9hoffer@maverickbbs.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bernard from San Buenaventura, Calif on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 12:48 pm:

As someone who is in the business of selling classic cars, doing PPEs and appraisals, each of which cost anywhere between $350 and $500, I would advise you not to waste such kind of money on a relatively inexpensive car. If you merely want to establish the value of the car, do some research, for example, by going to eBay and searching for "Model T" under "completed listings only" in the "Cars and Trucks" category.

Without having seen even a single photo of the car, it could bring anywhere from $2,8K as a non-runner to $6K for a straight original that somebody thinks needs restoring when in fact that would be a stupid thing to do. So if you aim for $5K, it would be silly to spend 10% of this on an appraisal, especially since buyers don't care about what an appraiser thinks the car is worth.

The buyer will pay for the car a notch of what he feels it's worth. Keep in mind: a car is worth what somebody is willing to pay for it. Put it up for sale and let the prospective buyers tell you that number. If it works for you, sell it, otherwise hold on to the car 'til spring and advertise it free of charge in various publications.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 02:39 pm:

I agree about not hiring an appraiser. I have seen way too many "professional appraisals" done by stuffed shirts that know absolutely nothing about the antique car hobby. "Try to find another one just like it" is not a sensible reason for a ridiculously high price for something no one really wants. "It cost $50,000 to restore" doesn't make a car worth that much either. Nor does "it WILL cost $20,000 to restore and have a $15,000 car" make a car worthless. An antique automobile appraiser needs to be in the antique automobile hobby to understand these things. Owning a '57 Chevy or '37 Packard doesn't count.
My other main complaint about appraisals is that most collectibles, especially complicated mechanical things like automobiles, have a price range, not a fixed figure. There can be a large difference between the "finding the right buyer" and the "I need it gone". A proper appraisal should reflect that.
Several of the people mentioned above may be fine, a few I know are as they are regulars here and well known. This site is the best source of information related to model Ts. You can get the best information available for less effort than meeting with an appraiser. A few photos and some minor information posted and you'll get all you need to make a reasonable deal. Maybe even a buyer.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Monday, December 05, 2011 - 04:51 pm:

There is a difference in getting an official appraisal and running it by someone who is knowledgeable and asking them what they think.

I think Bernard's range of values is too small.

If one has little knowledge of what he is selling then getting knowledgeable input is valuable.

With all this in mind, start high on your price, you can always come down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel(Indiana Trucks)Star City In on Tuesday, December 06, 2011 - 10:10 pm:

A few years ago an appraiser came to look at my 1916 Indiana Truck and had never seen one or even heard of one before. The report I got back still is funny to read and he had no clue what he was looking at. I had seen a 1923 Indiana sell for $34,000 at auction but mine was worth scrap value to maybe $500. I know the $34,000 truck was in better shape but still was not a running truck and was not restored. The guy later sent me a note to say he now thinks the truck is worth a lot more than his appraisal because he has seen other old trucks in the same condition sell for thousands more than he thought.


I say your best bet is to post some pictures here where the people know what they are looking at are and let a couple of them go look at it if you feel the car is in better shape than the prices you get here. Don't waste your money on a so called expert. My truck is worth way more than $500 and way less than $34,000 in the shape its in. You wont find it in any old car book but a model T you can find. If you want to look it up yourself, buy an old cars price guide and read the part about how to grade the car and then look it up in the book. This will give you a good idea of about where to start on a price but it is not always 100% right all the time.

Good luck,
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, December 06, 2011 - 11:39 pm:

Julius and Ross are not "Appraisers" but they are both restorers, owners, drivers and very active in the hobby. If you have a Model T to sell, I think you would find their input very valuable. Posting the car for opinions on the forum costs nothing, will get you lots of input and might get you a sale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Melanie Benham on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 06:13 am:

I am going to try to get pictures in the next week or so and will post them. Thank you all for your input.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 08:23 am:

Melanie,

Where is the car located? Texas is a big place. A non running Model T coupe is not likely to be worth more than 3 - 4 thousand dollars. Probably less.

If the car is anywhere near Dallas I would be glad to help. My email is:

roycegte (at) earthlink (dot) net


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