Child car seat photos

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Child car seat photos
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mattthew G California on Tuesday, December 06, 2011 - 01:59 am:

I know that I have seen at least on child car seat photo from the T period. Can someone either post on here or give some links?

Thanks,
Matthew


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Tuesday, December 06, 2011 - 03:50 pm:

Here's a few shots of ours. Actually fits better in the front door because of the door opening shape.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Tuesday, December 06, 2011 - 05:05 pm:

That looks kinda unsafe. Were they very popular in the day?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Sutton on Tuesday, December 06, 2011 - 05:11 pm:

I don't think there's much of a difference between these 2 scenarios during an accident:

1. Kid flys out of the car seat, hits windshield, mother follows and crushes kid when she hits windshield.

2. Kid is held in mothers arms and is squashed against windshield when they both slam against it.

If that sounds harsh, I'm the safety director at work and those are facts not my feelings. Back then the results of accidents were accepted differently than they are today so we look at things from an almost opposite perspective.

Craig


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Tuesday, December 06, 2011 - 05:33 pm:

A few Child Seat patents from the 20's.

Patent number: 1407408
Filing date: Aug 29, 1921
Issue date: Feb 21, 1922
http://tinyurl.com/7np3hzj
http://preview.tinyurl.com/7np3hzj

Patent number: 1448841
Filing date: May 13, 1922
Issue date: Mar 20, 1923
http://tinyurl.com/7x2yef9
http://preview.tinyurl.com/7x2yef9

Patent number: 1616349
Filing date: Jul 14, 1924
Issue date: Feb 1, 1927
http://tinyurl.com/6pghnru
http://preview.tinyurl.com/6pghnru

Patent number: 1664958
Filing date: Feb 9, 1925
Issue date: Apr 3, 1928
http://tinyurl.com/83c5ml9
http://preview.tinyurl.com/83c5ml9

Patent number: 1623259
Filing date: May 11, 1925
Issue date: Apr 5, 1927
http://tinyurl.com/7v79rcj
http://preview.tinyurl.com/7v79rcj

Patent number: 1747831
Filing date: Sep 4, 1928
Issue date: Feb 18, 1930
http://tinyurl.com/83nplez
http://preview.tinyurl.com/83nplez

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Tuesday, December 06, 2011 - 08:14 pm:

It's a Model T - if you all are that worried about the kids - take the Volvo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 03:23 am:

In last years forum Chris Bamford posted this pre 1906 Orient buckboard advertisement, showing the optional $25 child seat:
child seat

I've seen some type of crib hanging from the top bows of a Model T in an original photo, but I can't find it now..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 03:24 am:

In many states, children in antique automobiles are a bit of a legal problem. I can't really say that is a bad thing. Small children really should be in modern safety seats and properly belted into the back. This statement from someone who refuses to even put seat-belts in his '24 coupe where they might help, but they ruin that authentic feeling. But in that, I risk my safety, not a child's. Even in a rollover, a good carseat could save a small child. Generally, I would no more put seat-belts in an open T than I would on a motorcycle.
Realistically, children riding in an antique car are not in anymore danger than they are holding your hand walking down the street.
Another aside, way back in the day, it was not uncommon for a child to fall out of a moving automobile. Most often, due to low speeds and dirt roads, they were not seriously injured. With speeds and traffic these days, it is a little different.
Always drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 03:27 am:

Here is a 1950's version - some T connection, only the body shell, though;
http://justacarguy.blogspot.com/2010/02/life-magazines-gallery-of-norms-little.h tml


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks_-_Surf_City on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 08:16 am:

"Another aside, way back in the day, it was not uncommon for a child to fall out of a moving automobile."

I saw that firsthand when I was about 4-5 years old. A toddler fell out of the back window of a sedan, apparently hitting face first on the gravel shoulder, as it had many cuts. We were walking along old Hiway 66 in Ashland, Oregon, and it happened just in front of us. My Mom said he wasn't hurt real bad, because he was crying loudly.

To appreciate how far we've come in personal safety, you have to read Nader's "Unsafe at Any Speed." He described a kid losing an eye on a radio knob in a Buick making a fast stop from 15 mph, truly unsafe at any speed. A GM engineer defended lack of restraints by saying he trained his kids to put their hands forward for bracing when he yelled, "Hands!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 11:32 am:

My dad fell out of my grandfather's 1919 touring when he was a boy. He dusted himself off and jumped back in. Factor in that the car was probably doing 10 mph. Another time, probably in the 20's, my grandfather got a speeding ticket for doing 12 mph in downtown Detroit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 11:35 am:

The child's seat in the family's 1926 Fordor was two little wooden chairs on the back floor. Not fastened, just sitting on the floor. They were a family of 7 at the time. Still have the car, wish I had the chairs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 02:12 pm:

My comment above was not to be accusatory about the nostalgia of the old car seats or towards anyone who owns one - it was surprising to see how close the bottom of the seat was to the side of the door. All it would take is one rough bump and the kid would bounce onto the ground.

Growing up on a dryland wheat farm that had been in the family since we homesteaded in 1888, there were many old pieces of equipment without safety in mind; however, that did not stop my family from not using them or modifying them.
I realize it was a different era and that there were many unknowns with the advent of new technology. Common sense just doesn't apply to that type of seat in Steve's photo, from my viewpoint, at least.

I take my daughter all the time in the Model T. The car had seatbelts installed in the rear seat prior to my ownership and she always is strapped in with her carseat - I'll post a picture later in the day. It still won't be as safe as a modern car, yet I try to make it as safe as I can for all of the family, while still retaining the look and feel of the era. To take the modern metal would not do my daughter any favors. What appreciation would she gain for antique automobiles? Because we take the car to family outings and club events, I hope my daughter comes away with the same enjoyment and fond memories that I did as a child. I loved the HCC tours and riding in my dad's Michigan. It was one of the highlights of my youth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 02:55 pm:

Whe I was a kid, child seats in cars didn't exist—at least not as safety equipment—and those that did were not attempting any pretense of protection because nobody had yet come up with the idea of crash tests. Rather, such metal frameworks were clipped to the backrest of the front seat and the toddler inserted therein so as to keep the kid more or less stationary. For purposes of maintaining such static positioning, a distraction in the form of a cute little plastic steering wheel was attached and the child actually believed such minuscule gadgetry would impart directional control to the family behemoth. There was a little horn in the middle and beeping away at it was more fun than repeatedly whining, "Are we there yet?"



Older children could lay down on the rear deck, pressed up against the back window, or sit on Dad's lap, sharing the driving duties, four hands on the 24-inch, finger-knurled wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 08:17 pm:

I'm not sure what is meant to happen if the car should stop quickly with this design:
seat


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L. Vanderburg on Wednesday, December 07, 2011 - 09:09 pm:

I used to stand up in the front seat as my dad whizzed down the road at 55 miles an hour. Those were the days....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren W. Mortensen on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 08:06 am:

Will, I did much the same thing. Some folks today would be shocked that we survived our childhoods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks_-_Surf_City on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 09:45 am:

I remember standing between my 17 year old brother's legs and steering the '36 Chrysler Imperial Airflow sedan when I was no more than four. He said we once went 100 that way. BTW, he joined the Navy not long after, and was one of the decorated heroes of the Franklin after it was hit 100 miles off Japan in March, 1945. He was interviewed for a DVD just released: "USS Franklin, Honor Restored."

The Ashland cop couldn't catch my two brothers with his '36 Ford, so convinced my Dad to sell the Airflow.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mattthew G California on Friday, December 09, 2011 - 10:57 pm:

I posted this because somewhere I remember seeing a touring with a basket for a baby that was held out over the back. Has anyone seen that?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Or on Friday, December 09, 2011 - 11:44 pm:

Ya 5 kids, 2 adults all in a cab over or fighting to see who got to sit on the motor facing the front and one facing the rear in a Ford van with the other three on floor,later we did get a rear seat. Or 2 moms and 8 kids in a ranch wagon! :-) Ah the good old days!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mattthew G California on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 01:56 am:

Okay I did some research and found these:





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mattthew G California on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 01:58 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mattthew G California on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 02:00 am:

This is my favorite:


Anyone up to use one of these?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 04:35 am:

My friends and I used to ride in the back of pickups hauling hay, grain trucks hauling corn, wheat, soybeans, etc., you name it. I don't see how we survived, we didn't even have helmets to wear while we rode our bikes! We also used to ride car hoods upside down in the snow pulled by a car on snow covered roads on a long rope. I don't know how I survived as a helicopter door gunner in Viet Nam without OSHA. Being prepared for an accident is one thing, but I think we have forgotten one very important thing in todays society, that is how to avoid the accident in the first place. In MHO, there is a lot of emphasis placed on how to be prepared for an accident, which is good, but it seems to me that accident prevention has taken a back seat. When I drive, I still watch for possible problems.JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tman on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 08:22 am:

Just had to post thisModel T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 06:41 pm:

That certainly was a cool looking car. One of my favorite shows, too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tman on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 09:44 am:

Here is a version I would like to build someday.limo?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 10:26 pm:

Sounds like a lot of us have a story about unsafe cars. Hard to imagine in today's environment.

As about a 4 year old, my mother was taking me to a Dr. appointment in the family 1940 Chevrolet sedan. I was in the back seat (suicide doors). Evidently I had my hand on the door handle, because when she stepped on the brakes at an intersection I braced myself on the door handle and next thing I knew I was standing in the middle of traffic watching my mother drive away. She quickly realized that the door was open and looked around to see if I was OK. She later said she was in a state of shock when she stopped and waited for me to get back in the car.

We continued on to the Dr. appointment. He was an asthma doctor, but said my cuts and bruised should heal fine.

Moral of the story: I've been a Ford man all my life.

Dick Fischer

Dick Fischer


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