Gas Tank Sealer

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Gas Tank Sealer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Pacoima, CA on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 06:04 am:

OK, here's the deal.

Back in '79 when I first started my project, the gas tank I got was in pretty good condition (overall) with the exception of being very rusty on the inside. I was afraid of having it boiled out, for fear that all I might get back were a lot of holes all over the tank at best or just the brass thread fittings at the worse. So I asked members of the club what to do and their advice was to use gas tank sealer to coat the rust to keep it sort of glued down and keep it out of the gas line.

Back then it was fine, most of the gas you bought back then was leaded. But now with the advent of the Ethanol's being the standard, it's eating my old sealer off the tanks walls. I know this topic came up before, but I can't remember what was suggested to remove the old sealer. I figure once I get the tank cleaned out I'll just buy one of this in tank filters from Lang's to keep all that old rust out of my fuel line.

So, is there anything I can just slosh around in the tank to dissolve the old sealer and then pour out the goop?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - SE Georgia on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 06:51 am:

I've heard acetone or MEK, but frankly don't believe you would ever get it all out. For a cowl tank or something that is not being reproduced, I would try, but for a round or oval underseat tank, I'd just buy a new one. I think they are about $150. You'd probably spend nearly 1/4 of that in solvent alone just trying to get the old sealer out and don't know if you would succeed. I probably wouldn't have the patience to keep trying.

Of course, if ethanol is cutting it, get some E-85. Only problem is that I don't believe it just instantly turns the stuff to liquid. I think it is a matter of long term exposure turning it into a thick goo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 07:16 am:

With all the baffles inside a cowl tank, you might have to open it up to be sure you get it all out of the corners and seams. Here is what you will find if you do that. You can still get regular non-ethanol gas. There is a website that you can go to that will give youall the gas stations in your area that supplies it. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 07:17 am:

With all the baffles inside a cowl tank, you might have to open it up to be sure you get it all out of the corners and seams. Here is what you will find if you do that. You can still get regular non-ethanol gas. There is a website that you can go to that will give youall the gas stations in your area that supplies it. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Pacoima, CA on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 07:56 am:

Jim,

I wouldn't count on it here in California for finding anybody selling non-ethanol gas, they'd have the bloody EPA down on them in a heart beat if they tried. Haven't your heard, were supposed to be the leading the nation as the "Green State" (what a load of happy horse s... that is!) There used to be a joke about Hollywood, "what wasn't fruits or flakes were just NUTS!" Well that pretty much describes the entire state of California these days.

Hal,

My tank is the oval type, for a '22, and you're right it probably sat in the tank for about a couple of weeks if not longer before it turned to glop (and only half a tank at that). I was just hoping that there was something that removes it, rather than filling the tank with gas and letting it set for a week or two (kind of expensive that is)...looks like I'll have to opt for the new one. :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode - Onalaska, WA, USA on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 10:15 am:

Here is a site that list ethanol free gas stations by state:
http://pure-gas.org/index.jsp?stateprov=CA

California has very few (only 5) compared to other states.
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 10:58 am:

Would it work to reseal the tank with some of the new sealer leaving the old sealer in place???????


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 11:07 am:

I wouldn't use a sealer in my gas tank! There are good originals out there that don't need anything! Clean out an original and use it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Dupree on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 03:44 pm:

If it is a 26/27 tank, it should be cut open like Jim Patrick says. If it is an earlier tank, those are available brand new for a reasonable price. I would not waste my time trying to salvage a tank unless I could clean it out properly. I just did the fuel tank on a Farmall Cub. Cut the bottom out, sandblasted and wire brushed the entire interior, then used Bill Hirsch's sealer to seal and protect the tank. I did two applications of the sealer to provide proper protection. From what I have seen, either the Hirsch or Red Kote are probably the best sealers to use.

Ron Dupree


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - SE Georgia on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 03:57 pm:

I've used sealer in the past, but unless I'm trying to plug pinholes on something rare, I doubt I will ever use it again. A 'standpipe' made of brass screen soldered into the shutoff valve body of most anything will keep any rust or trash from getting into the rest of the system. For underseat T tanks, these are readily availbale from T parts suppliers. For my antique outboard motors, I make them myself from a fine mesh brass screen available from McMaster-Carr.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 04:52 pm:

Por-15 and Kwik Poly both are impervious to alcohol.
I never saw a thin film that has the strength of Por-15........it's amazing stuff.
I think most people err by not allowing enough cure time no matter what they use.......bad mistake.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 05:01 pm:

Also good is Caswell's epoxy sealer

http://www.caswellplating.com/aids/epoxygas.htm

They say the tank doesn't need to be completely free of rust, just get all the old sealer out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 05:43 pm:

Let me second John's suggestion of Caswell's epoxy sealer. I've used it on 3 motorcycle tanks now, two had multiple pinholes. It does a phenomenal job, no more rusting, no leaks.

Cheers
schuh


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