24-27 Ton Truck Assembly Highland Park

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: 24-27 Ton Truck Assembly Highland Park
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Miller, Sequim WA on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 05:56 pm:

Maybe one of you guys could shed some light on the Assembly of the 24-27 TTs. As I understand it they were produced along side of the Fordson tractor line in the same building in Highland Park. Does anyone have Photo's they want to share. Also its seems to me that these were shipped with the cab attached as they were riveted to the frame.
Any thoughts?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 06:10 pm:

I do not recall ever seeing a cab riveted to the frame. Like the cars, they were bolted so the frame flex would not tear the body apart.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Hagstrom on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 06:24 pm:

Mr. Miller, hopefully Bruce McCalley can shed some light on your question. It is my understanding that the Fordson tractor was produced at Highland Park only from 1917 until 1921 at which time part of the Rouge plant complex was completed for Model F tractor production from sometime in 1921 through 1927. Tractor production was then moved lock, stock and barrel to Cork, Ireland.

Therefore the TT truck would not have been built alongside the Fordson tractor line at the Highland Park plant during the 1924 - 1927 time period.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 08:08 pm:

I am fairly certain that none of the ( Model T Era ) Fordson Tractors were built at the Highland Park Plant.

This picture below is of the very early Tractor Factory at Dearborn. All this area later became the Rough Complex. Henry Ford became interested in this area when the Ford Motor Co. were constructing the Eagle Boats for the U.S. Governnent. I don't thing any of the TT's or Tractors were ever built at the same Plant. Regards, John




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 08:28 pm:

The picture John posted is the old Tractor plant before operations were moved to the Rouge in 1921. This area didn't become part of the Rouge, this building was torn down and the EEE building was erected in it's place in the late 1920s.

The EEE building is a couple miles from the Rouge plant.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 10:00 pm:

Thank you Luke, I thought that you would have some good information on the subject. Regards, John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Miller, Sequim WA on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 06:28 pm:

Opps, I was thinking one place and listed the other. I meant to say that the TT was probably built at the River Rouge plant not the Highland Park plant. Some information I have suggests that the first TT,s were built in the Highland
Park plant before moving to the Rouge plant. The Fordson tractors were definitely built in the Rouge plant from 1919 through 1928 before production was moved to Ireland. It is interesting that the same office that was used for the Fordson Engineers was also used for the TT,s. I have also discovered that Ford intended to build a 2 Ton truck under the name of Fordson at the Rouge in 23 that was never put into production. Here is a picture of one of the twelve prototypes.1923 2 ton


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 06:46 pm:

Fred,

The Fordson tractor wasn't produced at the Rouge until 1921. From 1918-21 they were produced at the building John posted a photo of.


Ford Bryan's books "Beyond the Model T" and "Friends Family & Forays" go into detail about both the plant and the Fordson Truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez - Templeton, CA on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 07:41 pm:

Interesting design to the Fordson truck in the photo. Looks like Ford was thinking of a cab over design to improve weight distribution. I would love to see more of his concepts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 07:52 pm:

Fred, that pic of the truck, looks like they gave up on design and just banged the cab on a shortened drive train ......sorry me thinks that is ugly...

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Manuel Voyages on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 11:02 pm:

Those 'Fordson' trucks were mainly done in the UK.

Manuel in Oz


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Monday, December 12, 2011 - 12:29 am:

Manuel , As Fred mentions the Fordson Truck pictured above is a Prototype that was experimented with and never went into production. The English version was a later development. Pictured below. The two books that Luke mentions are both well worth having and give an insite to a lot more of the other areas that Henry Ford dabbled in. regards, John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Miller, Sequim WA on Monday, December 12, 2011 - 12:32 am:

Boy Luke you were right. I went back and read again the article I have that was written by Ford Bryan and he just says that Fordson Tractors were all made in Dearborn until 1928. I assumed that meant the Rouge since Ford Benson stated that the tractors were the first things to be assembled there at the Rouge. Anyway, I'm no expert on Fordson, I am just trying to track down some impossible to find facts on the TT,s mainly more info on where they were built. I,m with Dave and glad they never built those less than attractive Fordson Trucks .
If anyone has some TT factory assembly photos please share them with us..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Manuel Voyages on Monday, December 12, 2011 - 12:50 am:

Sorry John.
I meant Fordson tractors were converted into trucks in the UK. It started in the 1920s I think.
The Fordson and Thames trucks were not the same.

Manuel in Oz


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Monday, December 12, 2011 - 12:53 am:

These two pictures are from the Ford Motor Co. Copenhagen.
The pictures show both passenger and truck components.
In that particular Factory it would appear that both were assembled either on the same line or separate assembly line.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom J. Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Monday, December 12, 2011 - 11:27 am:

In regards to John Page's photo and Luke Dahlinger's comments, I can add the following.



There were originally three "ponds" on this property. They are the remnants of the clay pits that supplied the brick kilns that were formerly on this property before the plant was built here. Many of the homes in Dearborn were built from bricks fired here. In 1979, Ford needed more parking spaces. For a while they leased part of the parking lot from the Henry Ford Museum. This was before the Automotive Hall of Fame was built. To make the North Pond lot, the pit was partially drained and all of the fish (mostly carp) that were in that pond were located to the south pond. During the draining, a lot of antique bottles surfaced and were claimed by the workers doing the draining and paving.

To the east of the EEE/POEE Building, a small triangle of green grass is visible just below (south) of the triangular pond. The building next to that green patch is one of the original buildings from the Ford Airport. The rail line in the photo was split and the northern part is used for freight and the Amtrak to Chicago. The southern portion of the line is on the museum property and is used to store unrestored rolling stock.


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