Cast Steel Spoke Wheel

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Cast Steel Spoke Wheel
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russ Furstnow on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 09:14 pm:

I found this wheel in the rear seat of my 1924 Tudor when I purchased the car. Unfortunately, there was only one wheel. The wheel fits a 30 3 1/2 demountable Ford rim and uses a stock Ford hub. The six spoke center is very heavy duty and is riveted to the inner rim. I have no idea who manufactured this wheel or what application it could have been used for.

Does anyone have any information about this wheel?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 09:44 pm:

Russ if you want to sell it let me know as I have an accessory car I'm building, and I only have 1 odd spring wheel which also is a 5 lug 30 x 3 1/2, might as well have a mismatched pr on the rear danuser88@socket.net


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 11:25 pm:

Interesting!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russ Furstnow on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 08:15 am:

John, Thanks for the offer, but I really would just like to find out some information. Russ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 09:50 am:

Russ

That's a nice accessory wheel. Interesting that it uses the T rim, bolts on the same as wood wheel. Would think the time of mfg would be after the intro of Fords use of demountable. Maybe '21-'22?

Have looked thru my ref materials, and can't find a match. The Atlas brand was all steel, not cast, and is made more like a wood wheel.

My guess is the all iron was for strength and maybe yours was intended for heavy duty truck use?





A friend has this one, (only one) rather unique too, all steel with pressed spoke design. He is after another if anyone ever sees one, let me know. He thinks it would be great on the front of a cut down T lawn tractor or something.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 09:58 am:

Bill Smith at SPEEDWAY has this above wheel in his museum


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russ Furstnow on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 10:15 am:

Dan, We were thinking that it could be a front TT truck wheel also. It is very well built, and would make a great speedster wheel. You would not have to worry about breaking the wheel going over speed bumps, like Howard and Ed did on the AZ speedster run a couple of years ago. It is probably the safest wheel I have seen for someone wanting to go faster than 35 mph!

Russ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay-In Northern California on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 10:59 am:

Here's a link to the Atlas wheels on our 15 touring.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/128061.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 08:18 pm:

As I recall, Ed broke an axle. Steel wheels are more likely to break axles because they transfer more shock from the road through to the rear end. Which is what made that event truly unique. The wood wheel broke an axle and the steel wheel broke a spoke! Good wood wheels are okay up to 70mph or so under almost all normal conditions. Almost always, when they break, it is due to a collision or serious weakness that should have been easily seen upon a routine check.
That said, I really like most of the many accessory wheels for Ts. I wonder how many have had pictures posted on this site in the past few years?
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, December 12, 2011 - 04:35 am:

Russ, I have no idea for sure of the origin of that wheel, but it may have been made for a tractor conversion for a T. Just a thought. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks_-_Surf_City on Monday, December 12, 2011 - 07:57 am:

For a steel or aluminum spoke wheel to be as strong as a hickory spoked wheel, it would have to be maybe 50% heavier. Hickory yields and comes back to original shape. When steel or aluminium yields, it stays deformed.

Shock absorbing is particularly important with wheels. Before you invest in steel or aluminum spokes, go buy a sledge hammer with a handle of the same alloy, and compare it to one with a hickory handle.

Resilience is the property that makes hickory ideal for spokes. Absorbing impact is deceleration. A resilient spoke will deflect a few or many hundredths of an inch, decelerating that impact over a measurable distance. If a metal spoke deflects only half as much, the impact load will be double (or is it squared?).

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, December 12, 2011 - 03:00 pm:

rdr,
If I remember my physics math, from a very long time ago, I believe that multiplier is that the force (or stress) to the axle would be squared.
Thank you for an good explanation.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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