OT B17 photographs

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: OT B17 photographs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Hansen on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 06:14 pm:

The pictures in this link IMO are some of the best photographs of B17ís I have seen, particularly the interior. I think you War Bird guys will enjoy

http://home.comcast.net/~szee1a/Al_overcast/Al_overcast.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way . Wa. on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 06:32 pm:

Great shots Jerry Thanks. I flew in and worked on B-29's from England to Japan ( Korea )But that was 56 years ago, How times flyes when your younger.

Bob



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Rapinz--Garrettsville, Ohio on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 06:50 pm:

All the different "nose art" is a study unto itself! Thanks for the pics and link!
Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way . Wa. on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 07:09 pm:

Dave
That is only 3 of the 24 that I have, taken the end of the Koren CONFLICT. They were removed by order of Mrs Ike, she didn't like them.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 07:17 pm:

Jerry, thank you very much for posting those great pics. Really nice.

Bob, I enjoyed seeing the pic of the nose art of B-29, "Lady Be Good". The original LBG was a B-24D which failed to return from her first mission in April, l943. After her wreckage was discovered in the Libyan desert in 1959 the fate of her crew was gradually uncovered during the following months. Fascinating story. I've made a study of it for many years.

Thanks again, guys. Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve in Tennessee on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 07:26 pm:

Either there were two Lady Be Goods or that is a B-24. I suspect there were more than two aircraft bearing the name. But the more well known was a 24 that overran her ADF signal with a tail wind and was lost in the Sahara. I once saw one of the 50 cals recovered from her. A guy in Nashville had it. He said it functioned perfectly when they found it...I think in the 70s. I remember first hearing the story when taking "Theory of Instrument Flight" in college. The instructor used it to illustrate the maxim "always trust your instruments." Then while in ROTC we visited a small shop that was making M2 Brownings and the owner had one of her guns. Was sobering to hold it and reliaze what happened to its operator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - SE Georgia on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 07:45 pm:

Nope, that looks to be a 29 to me.

I had the pleasure of shading myself under the starboard wing of Aluminum Overcast a few years ago while watching the air show during Sun-n-Fun in Lakeland, FL. When it was her turn to taxi out, the co-pilot warned us that they were about to start her up. Everyone cleared the props, but didn't wander too far off. I was still under the wing when she fired up. The sights, sounds and smells......unforgetable. So was the resulting sunburn from losing our shade.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve in Tennessee on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 08:02 pm:

you are right. look at the nose gear.

wonder how many Lady Be Goods there were.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 10:38 pm:

My cousin Mary's late husband, Paul Satterlee, worked in a photo lab in the south Pacific during the war. Here are three pictures from his collection.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 10:51 pm:

Here's another bomber. This is a B-25 on the ground in Kansas City, 1942.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 11:17 pm:

We used to have a factory in England. The chief engineer told me that when he was a small boy, there was a junk yard nearby that had lots of US bombers in it. The boys would sneak in thru a hole in the fence & play "army" in those planes. He said many of the planes had artwork on the inside of the hulls as well as on the nose. He wished he had been old enough to take pictures of them. One day they got the bright idea of sneaking home a 50 cal machine gun out of one of them & the parents had a fit & turned them in. That was the end of their great playground.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 04:55 am:

My late mother was a Capt. in the Civil Air Patrol in the early 50's. She's the one in the dark flight suit.

She was very fond of B-17's till the day she died.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 08:20 am:

The B-17 has always been amazing to me. I always marvel at the size of that tail.

Here is a local B-17 and this is the only time you will see one in the same room with a plane that makes it look small.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bruckzone/4149778900/in/set-72157622914023642/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 09:35 am:

At first I thought it was a "Peacemaker" but the tail didn't look right. Had to google the museum to find out it was "The Goose". Back in the stone age, by dad's cabin cruiser was moored down by the Summa hanger. I remember when they rolled it out for the first time back in about 1980, I think.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration