Rebabbitt the ball cap at home?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Rebabbitt the ball cap at home?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 04:46 am:

I'm cheap & likes to learn old ways of doing mechanical stuff - that's why I tinker with T stuff :-)

I'm thinking the rebabbitted ball caps has gone way up in price lately (+ a core needed = double overseas shipping or $25 extra for me) so it just might be worthwhile to try doing it at home?

I have some babbitt, a oxy-acetylen welder for heat, Tintite is on its way & a friend has a lathe - so I wonder how much draft angle is needed for the mold/plug in the middle so it can be pulled after casting? Do you split the mold/plug in the middle to minimize extra babbitt thickness from the draft angle?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 08:29 am:

Roger, you have all the equipment. Use enough draft that a hammer tap will remove the core pattern. The amount is not critical, but you must have some. Don't be concerned by the amount of extra babbitt, pour it thick walled. You will remove anything that does not look like a bearing with the lathe. Be sure to tin the housing before pouring the babitt.
The ball cap needs to be centered in the lathe using a four jaw chuck. Center on the "ring", just behind the flange using a dial indicator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 08:37 am:

Roger: Email me and I will send you a picture of my jig for pouring the ball cap. Dan

danielh462@centurytel.net


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis - SE Georgia on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 09:09 am:

Good for you Roger and don't let anyone tell you that you can't do it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 09:14 am:

I have poured many ball caps. My mold had no draft; it was made of steel and it had an oxide surface to prevent bonding. It drives out quite easily when cooled. Machining method is your option. Plug drain/lube hole with a piece of asbestos and a band clamp.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 09:29 am:

I made a mold to produce my own main bearings for my Model N. They're a little different as they are really just a babbit bushing that gets pressed into the crankcase. The end bearings that is. Anyway, I made the mold out of wood with a piece of broomstick used as the "core". Just a bit of smoke when I did the pour. No draft angles on anything and it came apart fine. And, even if it didn't, it was just wood which I could cut away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 09:52 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 10:36 am:

Thanks all for great suggestions! Jerry: Wood - ok, why not :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 12:24 pm:

The same as what Bob does .

340R
341R
342R
343R
344R
345R
346R
Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bartlett on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 03:20 pm:

Jerry V-
I will assume the smoke was the burning wood. If so, next time coat the wood with oil, it will burn instead of your stick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 03:35 pm:

The wood was only slightly scorched and lightly discolored. Thanks for the tip!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Langevin , Grants Pass , Ore on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 08:23 pm:

If you coat a steel core pattern with carbon black , the babbitt will not stick to it . Use a torch burning acetylene only , or a kerosene lamp as a source , and lay it on thick .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep NZ on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 10:36 pm:

Interesting... Can you use high tin solder? There might be less pounding on one of these bearings that would make the lead crumble.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Friday, December 16, 2011 - 07:42 am:

There were at least 2 types of "4th Mains". One has 3 holes plus the oil hole in the babbitt area, the other has 1 oil hole. The one with 1 oil hole needs to be "tinned" with Tintite. The other uses the 3 holes for the "anchor" and I don't believe was tinned originally. My guess is the 3 hole type was earlier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Friday, December 16, 2011 - 02:55 pm:

The Ball Caps, with 4 holes, are after Market, ball caps, they came with lead babbitt, Many came with No Holes, but were good Quality, Ford, I dont know with out going to sales Lit. We don't mess with the 4 hole after Market, they are junk, and they also have a seam. Last, all call caps need to be tinned, and babbitt stuck to it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Saturday, December 17, 2011 - 09:53 am:

If you have any questions about the babbitt you are buying request a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) on it and I will tell you every metal that's in the babbitt by percentage. I've beeen lucky enough to find huge babbitt bearings at the scrap yard, and they have a tool that looks like a hand held scaner that also gives the metal compisition by %. I thought I might buy one of the HP tools, but at $26,000 I'll let them tell me the content.


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