Magnet recharge

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Magnet recharge
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 11:22 pm:

Try this one; charge the magnet like you always do, and do the lift test, adding weight until it will not hold. Now rap the magnet hard and while it's vibrating rush it back to the charger and energize. Now do the lift test again. The ones I've tried lift significantly more. I don't think I'm selling snake oil on this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Friday, December 16, 2011 - 12:00 am:

Bob
Here is a link to an excellent primer on magnet recharging.
Magnetic Hysteresis
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Saturday, December 17, 2011 - 08:20 am:

Ron, or anyone else that may know this answer, one more question please.

Is a 36 volt golf cart battery charger as good for recharging the Model T magnet set (with the flywheel removed from the engine and the coil ring placed directly on the magnets)as the 36 Volts available from six 6-Volt or three 12-Volt batteries?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P. Steele on Saturday, December 17, 2011 - 08:34 am:

James I tried a 36 volt golf cart charger and it did not work well trying to recharge magnets in the car. Three 12 volt batteries worked great. I have know idea if it's any different when you have it out of the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Saturday, December 17, 2011 - 08:56 am:

It is amps not volts that do the job. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Saturday, December 17, 2011 - 10:02 am:

James, I successfully used a 12vt battery charger on the 100 Amp Boost setting to charge individual magnets. It seemed to work well — after charging they picked up not only the cast iron piston but also all the hardware beside it. That was one year and 2,000 miles ago and the magneto still runs strong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Saturday, December 17, 2011 - 03:27 pm:

Perhaps if this mfg was still in business, we could get 'super' magnets for the Ford ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, December 17, 2011 - 04:08 pm:

Bill Stipe has super magnets on his T - rare earth cylindrical magnets: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/184572.html?1320869003


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare on Saturday, December 17, 2011 - 08:17 pm:

what is the difference between magnets and rare earth magnets ???

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Saturday, December 17, 2011 - 09:14 pm:

Made of so-called 'rare earth elements'.

Fields strength of rare-earth magnets can be in excess of 1.4 teslas, whereas ferrite magnets typically exhibit fields of 0.5 to 1 tesla. There are two types: neodymium magnets and samarium-cobalt magnets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Sunday, December 18, 2011 - 07:10 am:

I can not find a definition for a Tesla magnetic field. That must be a new one.

I found this information in Wikipedia:

The behaviour of electric and magnetic fields, whether in cases of electrostatics, magnetostatics, or electrodynamics (electromagnetic fields), is governed in a vacuum by Maxwell's equations.

In the vector field formalism, these are:

(Gauss's law)
(Gauss's law for magnetism)
(Faraday's law)
(Ampere-Maxwell law)

The Lorentz force law governs the interaction of the electromagnetic field with charged matter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Sunday, December 18, 2011 - 07:18 am:

In physics, Gauss's law, also known as Gauss's flux theorem, is a law relating the distribution of electric charge to the resulting electric field. Gauss's law states that:

The electric flux through any closed surface is proportional to the enclosed electric charge.

The law was formulated by Carl Friedrich Gauss in 1835, but was not published until 1867. It is one of the four Maxwell's equations which form the basis of classical electrodynamics, the other three being Gauss's law for magnetism, Faraday's law of induction, and Ampère's law with Maxwell's correction. Gauss's law can be used to derive Coulomb's law, and vice versa.

Simply put it is the E = IR of magnetism.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Sunday, December 18, 2011 - 09:23 am:

1 Tesla=10,000 Gauss
Tesla is normally used for very small magnetic fields and Gauss for larger magnetic fields.
The earths magnetic filed is measured in Tesla's and Model T magnets would be measured in Gauss.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Sunday, December 18, 2011 - 01:22 pm:

Thanks Ron! Now that you say that, I do remember it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Sunday, December 18, 2011 - 02:25 pm:

1 Tesla = 10,000 Gauss
I stated the last part poorly.
The Tesla is used for very large magnetic fields and Gauss for very small magnetic fields.
The earths magnetic field is approximately 1 Gauss or .0001 Tesla.
The Model T magnet would normally be measured in Gauss and measure in the range of 200-600 Gauss depending upon their state of charge and the many variables of the recharge procedure/methodology used.
Absolute Gauss measurements are highly dependent upon exactly how measurements are taken. For Model T magnets I generally rely on relative before/after recharge Gauss readings. That is good enough to see if you have fully recharged the magnet for use in the magneto.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Sunday, December 18, 2011 - 02:35 pm:

Ron, I have done some measurements with various Model T magnets that will or will not pick up a two pound weight. Right now it appears that about 375 Gauss will allow a Model T magnet to hold a two pound weight. I am soon getting another magnetometer that may be more accurate and I may have to revise that previous test result.


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