Fuel Pumps?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Fuel Pumps?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Pacoima, CA on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 02:05 am:

Ok, I've been going through my catalogs looking for goodies I need and I come across fuel pumps. I know they aren't really necessary to run a T, but do they help any? Maybe when the tank is less than half full on a steep grade they would be handy, but under normal driving circumstances I just don't see it. Can you turn them off and on when you need it? Or is that not really feasible?

How about those overflow tanks? They either mount to the firewall or suspend from the firewall to radiator rod, how do you fill those? Or does that take a fuel pump too?

I don't really relish the idea of having to back up steep hills, we have a few round here, but since I've never tried them I don't know if it's really a problem or not. By the way what is the grade that will cause a T to have to back up it?

Oh and belated Merry Christmas eveybody looks like a lot of had a really good ones. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy J Williams on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 03:38 am:

I have a fuel pump on my speedster, and yes I can turn it on and off with a toggle switch, my carburetor is a Texas T modern one and they recommend a low pressure pump. I know most T purests hate the thought but it is what it is.

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joncrane on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 04:06 am:

Tim
What kind of fuel pump are you using on your speedster? I have one on my speedster and the rubber diaphram inside is failing due to the new gas. Any suggestions?
Thank you


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy J Williams on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 05:21 am:

I am using a 12v from carquest autoparts. I think it is a 2-6lbs pump. I haven't had any diaphram issues with mine and it has been on 4 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By earl bolton on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 10:58 am:

I recall reading that 18 degree,s was the pitch at which the gas flow was interupted and this also saves the front main from running without oil. I dont remember where i read it from . happpy NY


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P. Steele on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 11:10 am:

My little Model T racer has a 6V fuel pump with a regulator following set at 1.5 # of pressure. It has an off/on switch attached to it. You can still find these new for sale, but I don't know if they can be purchased from automotive stores or not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 11:52 am:

I am using a 12 volt electric pump with a regulator to replace a vacuum pump that was on an aftermarket bodied model T. The tank in in the trunk and I was worried about steep hills and since the vehicle had that vacuum pump, I figured that someone else also thought it needed a pump.
See my profile to view the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep NZ on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 04:46 pm:

Thought i would need a pump but found i only have to back up most hills when i have 1/8th of a tank or so. Any hill steeper than that cannot be climbed so i try not to go down them first.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevin Gough on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 05:38 pm:

After numerous embarrasing and dangerous incidents of being stranded on steep hills with traffic trying to navigate around my stranded T, I put a low pressure pump and regulator in my T.

I have never had another incident.

The pump is all but invisible and if it ever fails, I can put my car back to standard in minutes.

If I want to be a purist, once again, just minutes.

Do I sweat it out on a hill now, wondering if I'll make it? Do I still have a gas can in the back beside the picnic basket?

It is a great improvement and a safety feature too. Maybe if you live where it is flat, it's not neccesary, but it's not like that where I motor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevin Gough on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 05:47 pm:

The day the above photos were taken, we were climbing the Crown range, to the higest public road in New Zealand. The temperture was well into the 30's (centigrade). Many cars either ran out of gas, or had vapour locks. I was so glad to know my pump was there doing it's thing!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 06:05 pm:

My boat-tail has the fuel tank very low and way to the back. So a fuel pump of some type was in order. For me, it needed to be correct vintage. The trouble we had here was from some junk in the fuel tank. It would have resulted in a roadside tear down even with a modern pump.

Vacuum tanks date back to at least 1914 and can be troublesome, but generally work well once you get them working right.
Another option is a pressurized tank with a hand pump. My coupe has that.
Drive carefully, and enjoy the New Year! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White, Sheridan, MI on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 07:26 pm:

I've seen where you can tap your exhaust pipe to pressureize your gas tank. Supposedly it is quite safe but you can add a fuel filter in the line to act as a flash supressor just to be sure. Anyone doing this?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 09:29 pm:

Here's a couple of thoughts about electric gas pumps cause I've changed two for a friend while on tours.
6 volt pumps are not stocked in many auto parts stores. You may have to wait a day or two till they get one delivered. They've got several 12 volts on the shelf. Some make a lot of noise. Not many other T drivers will carry a spare pump so you may want to add that to your list. Of course this only happens when your out on tour somewhere, Right

The exhaust pressure system will work and is very safe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 09:34 pm:

Here's a couple of thoughts about electric gas pumps cause I've changed two for a friend while on tours.
6 volt pumps are not stocked in many auto parts stores. You may have to wait a day or two till they get one delivered. They've got several 12 volts on the shelf. Some make a lot of noise. Not many other T drivers will carry a spare pump so you may want to add that to your list. Of course this only happens when your out on tour somewhere, Right

The exhaust pressure system will work and is very safe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JAMES STARKEY on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 09:55 pm:

What about hand operated pressure pumps? I am planning on using one on my Faultless speedster. I found these on line but at $250.00 I think I can make something similar out of brass in my home workshop for about 1/5th the price. Jimmy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 11:18 pm:

A fuel pump for a Model T looks like this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 11:40 pm:

We had a discussion about exhaust pressure fuel delivery earlier this past year (I think, it may have been farther back). They often have a couple vertical coils under the car to help cool exhaust and sparks as well as condense fuel vapors. Many high-end cars used this system in the early '10s. They are generally very safe.
My current project, a '13 T speedster, does not need help with fuel delivery. My next T project, waiting in the wings, is a '20s race car. I am very much considering using exhaust pressure to aid in fuel flow.
Again, I like to keep things as close to correct vintage as I can reasonably. That is part of what antique automobile preservation is about. The best place to tap off the pressure would depend a bit on the exhaust system. A full system with a muffler will have considerable "back pressure". The tap off can be a ways back from the manifold. A straight pipe releases pressure faster. The tap off would have to be close to the front of the pipe. The pressure could still be a little low, but the flame still hot. Make sure to cool it adequately. Also, remember that the smaller the inside diameter of tubing, the more resistance it provides across its length. I would use 1/4 or 5/16 tubing with at least two full vertical loops.
Drive carefully, and enjoy the New Year! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Pacoima, CA on Wednesday, December 28, 2011 - 01:55 am:

My car isn't a Speedster it's a Touring, I've never considered pressurizing the tank, not sure the tank could take it. But if I can hook up one of those 6v fuel pumps, like the ones I see in both Snyders or Langs to a switch, I could hide the lil gizmo out of sight and only use it as needed (like on a really steep hill). But it sounds like I need a regulator as well. The pumps in the catalogs say they provide 5-6 psi, is that too much pressure for my L-4?

And Steve, I like those gas pumps better than the electric ones we've got now. At least you could see the whole 9 gallons going into your tank and not back down the bloody hose into the stations tanks. My greatgrand dad had one of those on his farm, as I remember it had a big lever off to one side that you had to work back and forth to pump the gas up into that glass bowl. Then you put the nozzle in your tank and flipped the lever on the side and it dumped the bowl into you tank, nothing electric about that baby (gawd, I wish I had that thing today, along with the shoeing forge, the anvil and that hand cranked drill press, my dad thought it was all just old junk and didn't want to haul it back to California).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Wednesday, December 28, 2011 - 06:30 am:

Martin,

You don't need a fuel pump so long as you keep the fuel level above 2 gallons from empty. Any hill too steep to climb under that level is a formidable hill indeed.

We went on a local T "stroll" as we call them here in Texas and one of the cars broke down, a beautiful center door. It had a lawn mower carburetor and would not run except with the choke pulled. Sure enough his fuel pump had gone out.

So the root cause of the failure was the lawn mower carburetor, with an assist from the damn fuel pump. The right answer to problems like this is to never put lawn mower parts or fuel pumps on your Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks_-_Surf_City on Wednesday, December 28, 2011 - 06:44 am:

The 12v pump I have from Autozoner isn't free flow when shut off. It's the low pressure model, about 1 to 4 psi. As for those FP regulators, I found they stick shut if you run out of fuel, and you have to jiggle the dial.

I installed an exhaust pump. With my straight through cherry bomb muffler, I don't get enough pressure to get by the electric pump to the sidedraft carb on the Fronty head.

At least I'm getting free inerting of the ullage, the air space above the fuel.

rdr


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