Dearborn Equipment Transmission Bushing Reaming Tool

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Dearborn Equipment Transmission Bushing Reaming Tool
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 02:01 pm:

As promised in another thread here are photos and descriptions of the Dearborn Equipment Model T Ford transmission bushing reaming tool. Steve Coniff owns this tool and took the photos.
The Dearborn tool is designed to provide both radial and vertical alignment of triple gears and transmission drums when reaming the bushings. Radial alignment is obtained by internal gears which align with the Pitch Diameter rather than the outside diameter of the gear or drum aligning them with the accurately machined surface of the tool body. Any inaccuracy caused by worn teeth, eccentric wear and warping is thereby eliminated.
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This photo depicts the tool and all its fixtures. (The transmission drums and triple gear are not part of the tool) You can see the main body of the align reaming fixture, the wood box and four different size reamers, the various gear or drum indexing fixtures and the fixture for clamping a gear or drum to the main tool body for reaming
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These two photos depict the alignment fixture and itís installation on a triple gear. There is also an alignment fixture for each transmission drum.
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This photo depicts the triple gear and fixture installed on the tool body using the clamping fixture
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This photo depicts how a reamer is installed on the bar for reaming a bushing. All the reamers have a #2 Morse taper shaft.
Here are additional photos of the tool that will help show how it works.
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As you can see this is an excellent tool for reaming Model T Ford triple gears and transmission drums.
If you should stumble onto one of these tools, check to see if all the fixtures are there and grab it.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 02:47 pm:

Ron,
How is the shaft spun--looks like a Morse taper on it too.
Neat tool, now to peruse the junk places. . .
T'
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 03:01 pm:

Dave
Steve does not have the original handle for this tool.
There is a square cut on the end of the bar and it also has a Morse taper.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 03:05 pm:

There is a drawing of the original handle on page 13 Figure 7a in the MTFCA Transmission book.
Ron the coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Sutton on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 07:00 pm:

If one of our super talented T enthusiasts ever reproduces that tool, they'll be my hero.

Ron, thanks much for posting all the photos. I'd love to have one of those!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Brownsburg,In. on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 07:05 pm:

Steve has a rare gem there.If you ever find one and it isn't complete,you would spend the rest of your life looking for the missing piece. Many of the old tools are like that. They got pitched out when Model T's were no longer being used much.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 07:18 pm:

Ron,
No handle, eh? Gee Steve, without the handle, I'd say it's worthless--but I'd pay the shipping to have it here as a "wall hanger."
Hey, it's worth a try guys!
:-)
T'
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Loso on Wednesday, December 28, 2011 - 07:03 pm:

Ron,

I am thinking out loud here and may offend some. Being these are fixed reamers and they were made to ream the original bushing material and not today's reproduction bushings, isn't this just a shelf piece? Unless of course, you use the original bronze material and make your own new busings. From what I understand today's bronze bushings expand more than the original.

Just thinking out loud and rocking the boat a little.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 03:42 pm:

Andy
The idea of this tool is to align bore bushings concentric with the gear pitch circle. It is not like the KRW tool.
Depends upon whose transmission bushings your using. They are not all equal. Give me a call.
Ron Patterson


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 07:51 pm:

Andy, the reamer dosn't know what type of bronze, or brass it is reaming, it just reams. The Dearborn using the center to align from, and the Wilson uses the out side to align. They will both do a like job, but you have to spin the drums, before, with an expanding mandrill to see if any part is sprung, and after to see that something didn't slip when the bushing was reamed at 90 degrees. The reamers in either machine, are NOT like a drill Bit, that will follow a given Hole, the Dearborn, and Wilson reamers cut where the end takes them, they Do NOT follow the hole. Herm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 08:28 pm:

Herman
Both reaming fixtures are piloted, but they index the part to be reamed differently.
The KRW tool indexes the part being reamed to an unknown work surface that may or may not be concentric with the gear pitch circle.
The Dearborn reamer indexes the part to be reamed with the gear pitch circle which should be reamed concentric with all the other pitch circles roaming about inside the Model T transmission transmission.
Everyone knows what a straight line is so I will leave it to readers to determine how gear pitch circle concentric straight line is created.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Loso on Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 09:10 pm:

I understand why the dearborn unit is much better for concentrically reaming the bushings. I am just stating the reamer is fixed and will only ream to Ford's original specs, but with the bronze bushing of today, more clearance is needed so the reamer wouldn't be right unless you use the original type material.

I wish someone would reproduce these, but I imagine the cost would outweigh the benefit for a small home shop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 10:04 pm:

((Ron's Quote)) Both reaming fixtures are piloted, but they index the part to be reamed differently.

(( My Quote)) The Dearborn using the center to align from, and the Wilson uses the out side to align. They will both do a like job.

Isn't that what I said Ron. As far as a Wilson doing a better, or lesser job is just plain A%% not true. I have used a Wilson a long time, done 100's of drums, and the only way you can be off any is trying to use bent, or out of align parts. Besides Ron, how much closer do you need with Zero run out.


Andy, again a bushing don't care what it is made of, they need the same running clearance of any given size, any bronze, or Brass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 11:23 pm:

Herman
Once again I respect your opinion, but I disagree and will say it again: The Dearborn reamer indexes the part to be reamed with the gear pitch circle which should be reamed concentric with all the other pitch circles roaming about inside the Model T transmission transmission.
Think about it!
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 11:38 pm:

It would seem to me that unless the reamer itself is rigid and both reamer and drum are rigidly supported the reamer will follow the hole in the bushing. The reamer is not a boring bar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 12:13 am:

Ted
Look more closely at the design of the Dearborn tool.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 01:15 am:

The only way a reamer can follow the hole is if the shaft is flexible, they are end reamers, end reamers do not follow a hole, they bore dead center of the shaft that holds them. Milling bits also cut on the end, they DO NOT follow a hole. A reamer, and milling bit work the same way, except all reamers have more flutes



If you slid the bushing off to the side by .005, the finish hole will be off by .005. You are smoking your socks on this one Ron, and how many of the Wilson transmissions sets have you run Ron, and how many transmissions drums have you reamed and found out how the Wilson won't cut true?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 02:18 pm:

((Quote)) Herman
Once again I respect your opinion, but I disagree and will say it again: The Dearborn reamer indexes the part to be reamed with the gear pitch circle which should be reamed concentric with all the other pitch circles roaming about inside the Model T transmission transmission.
Think about it! ((End Quote))


Ok, Ron, I did as you said, I looked at it, and thought about it, guess what, your Premise is wrong. The alignment has nothing to do with the gear teeth, except to keep the gear from turning. The O.D. of the gear is where you get your alignment. You could cut all the teeth out of the Dearborn holder Jig, except .020 thousandths, on the IN Side, and it wouldn't change the centering of the gear AT ALL. The Dearborn is NOT centering off the teeth, it centers off the O.D. of the gear,just like Wilson does on the triple gear. The rest of the Wilson drums, are centered in reverse of the gear, Off the outside of the drum, but still comes out the same, if you don't try to build Junk. How did you miss that Ron?


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