Demountable clincher rims: Hot dip galvanizing?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2011: Demountable clincher rims: Hot dip galvanizing?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 02:07 pm:

I've been thinking of getting some rims galvanized, and I wonder if anybody here has done it. Specifically, I wonder if they survive the 800 process without warping. Any comments?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 03:06 pm:

I think the hot dip finish would be too rough.
T'
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 06:18 pm:

I had it done on my 1918 TT front rims Which are incorrectly demountables about twenty years ago. A TT doesn't go too fast but I neve have noticed any problems.
The inner rim around the end of the spokes is black so it is not affected and it draws any warpage back in line.

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 07:23 pm:

I have done it. About 30 years ago, we had to build some custom antenna mounting equipment. It was required to be galvanized. The plant in Oakland at that time, handled orders by the pound, with a fairly high minimum. Since the antenna brackets only weighed about two hundred pounds, I was able to throw in a couple hundred pounds of rust. So, among other things, I added a bunch of marginal (some were VERY marginal) clincher rims. I did no preparation whatsoever. I was shocked at how well they came out. A couple of rims that were rusted away enough that I had no plans of ever using on a runnable car, came out filled in enough to file the remaining sharpness and use. One rim with two bullet holes in it filled in nice enough that with just a little hammering it looked great.
I ended up using most of the rims on a couple of cars.

Some advice, though. Check and file the inner edges of the rims before taking them to be done (those edges need to be smooth or they can cut the bead in your tires). There will be some cleanup necessary after the galvanizing is done. It will be easier to do both the galvanize cleaning and the sharp edge filing if they are done separately.
Also, a few rims had slag end up in the clincher of the rims. It was easily cleaned out using the acetylene torch.
I thought the rims looked great, worked great, and the heavy coat salvaged a few rims that otherwise may have been scrapped. Sounds to me like win win win. I wish I knew of a place here to go to.
Drive carefully, and enjoy the New Year! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 07:30 pm:

Steve, one issue you may have to deal with is sharp little bits which occur in the hot dip process, much like soldering can produce. They will need to be carefully filed down to maintain the galvanised coating. They will most likely be on the edges of the clincher rim, depending on how they are lifted from the dip. I have seen some originals in Australia which were hot dip galvanised, but most were electro-plated zinc, which is thinner but much smoother.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 07:43 pm:

Steve, I have had a number of rims galvanized in the Houston area, but as the years go by, the enviroment boys are forcing some out of business.
I think there is at least one left and yes they do a good job with very little clean-up necessary before using.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Friday, December 30, 2011 - 10:37 pm:

I did a search for galvanizing outfits this afternoon. I started with the nearest big city, Wichita, and found zero. In the KC area there are two, but that's a drive of more than four hours. Then I looked at the Tulsa area, about three hours away, and found four! I talked to a couple of them, and it looks like I'm going to pick five of the best rims out of the pile and take them to Claremore. When I told the guy what I wanted to get dipped he was very interested and want to get pictures of the rims on the car. So we'll see how this works out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Saturday, December 31, 2011 - 11:53 am:

Rims were zinc plated, not galvanized. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Saturday, December 31, 2011 - 12:03 pm:

Galvanize
...
2 [often as adj. ] ( galvanized) coat (iron or steel) with a protective layer of zinc : an old galvanized bucket.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield, KS on Saturday, December 31, 2011 - 12:12 pm:

A little further explanation: If "plated" means electroplated, I'm consciously avoiding that because of my experience with nails. I have modern "galvanized" roofing nails on my porch roof that have turned to rust spots after just five years. On the other hand, I reuse eighty-year-old hot dipped nails because they're good as new.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, January 01, 2012 - 05:26 am:

Steve, this is my opinion, take it for what is worth. Galvanizing is indeed a hot dipped process, and has been mentioned, it may leave some pointy things that will have to be removed. It also will leave a much thicker layer than zinc plating will, and it is much more prone to chipping off than the zinc plating when mounting the tires. Although the zinc plating is correct, I just sandblast my rims and paint them with Rustoleum primer and then paint them with Rustoleum silver. Not correct, but very easy to maintain. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, January 01, 2012 - 09:17 am:

Rustoleum also makes a spray called "galvinoleum" (sp) which is a spray coating of galvinize type finish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Sunday, January 01, 2012 - 11:13 am:

Mine were cad plated 50+ years ago. Still look like new today.


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