OT... other hobbies?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2012: OT... other hobbies?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael grady on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:11 pm:

I've also been busy building a large HO scale Model train system. "for my sons"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:21 pm:

Z scale for me and sometimes G


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach & Big Bear on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:23 pm:

running a 21 foot long steam powered yacht on Big Bear Lake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:34 pm:

wood working,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:40 pm:

I enjoy my 50's and 60's FORD cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:42 pm:

S scale - American Flyer and flying "low & slow" !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Skip Anderson on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:46 pm:

One cylinder, chain driven autos over 100 years old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:46 pm:

Ham Radio
Lightning detection and plotting (blitzortung.org)
Designing and building wooden boats


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lee on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:51 pm:

Wood working,I'm building a speedster out of red eucalypus (a florida wood) I'll try and put up some pics.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:57 pm:

I ENJOY lining the pockets of oil speculators
who help export U.S. refined diesel to European Markets
while helping keep #2 diesel at a
record high national average of $4.00
or more a gallon for just about (3) months now ....





I don't have much money left to enjoy
anything other than an occasional ' Tres Equis ' beer ... :-)



Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 06:59 pm:

Ford Memorabilia, Citrus Industry collectibles, collecting Y-block Ford speed equipment, Florida History, Photography, Concerts & Chasing Women.

I have others but these get most of my time & money. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David A. Siver on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 07:14 pm:

Woodworking, hunt (mainly pheasants), fish, brew beer, trap and rim fire target pistol shooting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 07:16 pm:

Chemistry, Electronics (basic), Metallurgy, Metal Spinning, Metal Forming, Tool & Die making, Welding, Painting, PC Building, 50-60s Music, Pre-War autos, Gardening, Hemiptera, Rattlesnake hunting, Small Engine repair, and most recently; Farm Tractor, Implement and Dozer repair. And that's just in my stare time. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 07:26 pm:

I run an underground FM radio station over the air (107.7) and online in the evenings when I have nothing better to do. I'm producing content for said show at other times. If you want to listen in sometime, ask for the link...grin.

I also love the new genre of 3D, first person shooter video games.

Driving my Trans Am out in the country.

Anthropology and archaeology.

Metal detecting.

Writing.

Former hobbies - Ham radio, scuba diving, backpacking, hang gliding...

Drinking hard liquor when none of the above are happening...and sometimes even when they are.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Adair - Chelsea, Ok on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 07:36 pm:

Ham Radio KD5EWO, metal detecting with my Whites Spectrum XL detector, wood working, fishing, spoiling my granddaughter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 07:37 pm:

I used to model railroad: both HO scale and 1 to 1 scale (Prototype)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 07:42 pm:

Gardening one acre with old fashoned tools Hoe, rake, pitchfork, compost pile, hand saws, clippers and lopers etc. That gives me something to do almost every day to keep it up. It would be very boring to use weed eater, tractor power saws etc. And then I wouldn't have anything else to do other than feed the oil tycoons. In early spring, prune the fruit trees, then cut weeds until the rains are over about May 1. Vegetable gardening Then Model T trips interspersed with watering and picking fruit and making jam. This time of year it involves digging up the remains of the vegetable garden, and raking leaves. Always something to do. It has begun to rain off and on, so the weeds will start growing. Anyway, I don't know what I'd do if I lived in snow country! I have always lived in Southern California, so snow is something you go to when you want to and then come home.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep NZ on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 07:42 pm:

No, Only cool people have them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 07:49 pm:

Playing guitar. Started playing when about 13-14 yrs. old after listening to Chuck Berry on American Bandstand in 1959 and thinking I gotta do that!
Playing on and off in bands since then. Playing classic rock and country since about 1971.
Also Ham Radio from time to time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 07:54 pm:

Dave,

I also work with Marklin Z model trains. It's not for children.

I was the first one to put a micro-TV camera and S-band transmitter in a Z gondola car. It's quite thrilling to run a Z-tain while looking at the TV monitor.

Jim KG4ZGZ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ronnie Wehba on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 08:00 pm:

woodworking and pen turning


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 08:04 pm:

Ronnie

Made any pens yet with old Model T spokes?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 08:36 pm:

Music — Play keyboards (including accordion). Ran a dance band for nine years, playing resorts and weddings. Tried twice, but couldn't get the hang of guitar. Drums were easier (and there's a definite visceral satisfaction in beating the living daylights out of something with a piece of wood—with two, it's twice as satisfying). Couple of years ago, I built myself a set of drums because I couldn't afford a new set, but needed it for music ministry. You can see it here:

http://www.drum-building-secrets.com/homemade-drum-set.htm

Aviation — Private pilot, former airplane owner, aviation history. Wrote and hosted aviation safety presentations in AOL's aviation chatroom, Wright Hall. Last president of the P-47 Alumni Association (retired designers and builders of the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt). Radio-control model airplanes.

Writing — Mostly comedies, some aviation stuff. Now writing a science fiction novel that will never get published, but hey, it's fun.

Commercial Artist — 30-years of experience in advertising art. Name a product, I'll quote you a slogan or sing you a jingle.

Photography — Used to have a B&W darkroom in the basement—all the fun you can have with three trays, a pair of tongs and a red bulb.

Archery — The old-fashioned type of bow, with a string that deli-slices the skin on the inside of your forearm. No compound pulleys, laser sights, gyro-stabilizers or digital, heat-seeking, 2-stage arrows.

Story-telling. Gimme your e-mail address and I'll send you a downloadable audio aviation adventure or comedy.

Sailing — just little boats like this...

http://www.castlecraft.com/images/Snark-Sunchaser-one-two-lake.jpg

And my kid thinks I'm no fun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 08:40 pm:

I try not to hit cones.



Sometimes they get in the way.



The Chevelle is mine. It did have a 300hp smallblock, but is currently apart while I work on swapping in a fuel injected 600hp aluminum LS1 stroker.

The Miata belongs to a friend, and he let me try to drive it. It has a 500hp Corvette LS3 and gobs of torque... with no weight and small tires, driving it isn't easy. I slid it through the finish backwards on that run.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ronnie Wehba on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 08:46 pm:

and my older hobby,built this homebuilt great plane not fast did 70 mph,but fun


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 08:59 pm:

Collect neon signs, neon light bulbs and putter around with things electrical.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 09:02 pm:

Photography, Real radio ("Around Dodge City and in the territory on west...", "I dood it!", "No, no McGee, not that door!"), Other old stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John W. Oder - Houston, Texas on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 09:05 pm:

"Instructing the world" (sez Caroline)- 17,300 posts at Practical Machinist.com

Instructing the wooden Lockheed owners in their restorations (and providing original drawings and the knowledge of 40 years study)

http://www.aeromuseumservices.com

Plus still working four days a week at age 72.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 09:42 pm:

Amazing, John! I had never heard of the Altair. Will send PM.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 10:11 pm:

playing ragtime piano....since age 7


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 10:23 pm:

Latest creation. Done about 7 of them. All different. All walls wall papered. Wired for lights. On a board with a turntable under it. Complete with lawn, bushes, stone foundation. The works. Problem is nobody appreciates the work that goes into this so I've kind of stopped building/selling. Did 2 "on commission" as birthday presents. In both cases the mom's told their daughters: "You're not playing with this".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 10:34 pm:

Here's my N scale model railroad in a coffee table with a glass top. Complete town. mountain, waterfall, a lake, houses. Even a cemetery. Roughly 20" X 34".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 11:03 pm:

Among a variety of non vehicular items are a couple of 1930’s Rock-Ola pinball and slot machines, as well as a collection of motion lamps.
Here are most of them . . .



And some (‘useable/collectable’) small lathes, including a few Unimat mini lathes, with one being NOS and the others used
(but usable as needed) including many of the hard to find Unimat accessories for them. . .



Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 11:20 pm:

Author and inventor.
The Light in Dorky Walker, a Christian Youth novel
The Golden Scimitar, an aviation adventure story
"I Learned About Boating From This..." Boating experiences from readers of Burgee Magazine (My 40-year old boating publication).
Available at barnesandnoble.com and amazon.com. By R.E. Robb
1919 Model T Speedster & '65 Mustang with a rumble seat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ned Protexter on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 11:21 pm:

Any shotgun shooting (five-stand, trap, skeet) My buddy got this picture that I think is pretty neat. http://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?fbid=3854499319249&set=a.1403341921846.2049623.1181280477&type=1&the ater

Boating. We have two Century Arabians, one of which will be this winters project, We have to replace the stringers as they are rotten. When done it will make a great boat.

Also try to keep the girlfriend happy. http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1403341921846.2049623.1181280477&type=3 #!/photo.php?fbid=3114375581736&set=t.1181280477&type=3&theater


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ned Protexter on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 11:22 pm:

first one should have been this. http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1403341921846.2049623.1181280477&type=3 #!/photo.php?fbid=3854499319249&set=pb.1181280477.-2207520000.1352866907&type=3&t heater


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ned Protexter on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 11:23 pm:

Well...those links didn't work how they should have


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 11:28 pm:

Cars were my main hobby for twenty plus years until I rediscovered my love of motorcycles (dual sport riding). Before I inherited the T that's all I did for the past six years. Sold my cars to buy a bike. Love camping with the family also

Haven't been out for good ride since last March but hope to go out over Christmas for three or four solid days of riding in the California desert.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 11:31 pm:

Well,if it rust and used to run I mess with it.
I restore old radios sometimes,mostly old engines and garden tractors.Take a few to shows.I also build my own trailers to use like the 1 here in the center of the picture.Here is my Page tractor and behind it is my Planet Jr Tuffy.
Working on my Model K some in the shop.No not a car.A 1934 Briggs and Stratton model K.:>)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Leming on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 - 11:47 pm:

Lionel, ho guage and radios - lots of good old radios, the older the better!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Clipner-Los Angeles on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 12:35 am:

Refurbishing ant.furniture (inherited), ant.firearms,prepping urban redoubt,placer mining and just enjoying the outdoors when I'm inclined.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 01:41 am:

Who has time for hobbies??? I work all the time. When I do have time I like to play music. Been in bands off and on for almost 60 years. Traditional Country & Western Swing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 01:55 am:

Very cool Stan, and to the rest of you musicians.

I was in an amateur metal band in the 80s, playing guitar.

These days, I am content to jam on my Hohner Special 20 with a few old friends, playing the blues.

ANd what's that old joke? There are musicians, and then there are drummers and blues harpists...ho ho ho


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 01:58 am:

Love that pic btw, up in the plane, Steve.

ALso, Phillip, is that the upper Mojave you're riding in? We lived at Edwards AFB for a few years when I was a kid. Learned to ride a honda trail 50 (55?) when I was seven there - sort of. My dad would run along beside the bike holding the bars until it got going because I couldn't operate the clutch lever and pedals. That would have been around 1970.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 02:35 am:

Danial, to steal the lyrics from a great Ray Pennington song I've sung a thousand times or more.

I've watched the different music come and go,
And I have played a little Rock and Roll,
I've sung the Blues and Bluegrass and a thousand different things,
But if I had my druthers, then I'd rather play some swing.

I like a steel guitar, two or three fiddles,
Some horn men that can play most anything,
I like a big dance hall, a lot of happy people
Then turn me loose and let me sing.

Glenn Miller's in the Mood still turns me on,
Bob Wills and the Rose of San Antone,
They both played great music, they just called it different names,
If you put it all together, it would still come out the same.

I am never so happy as when I am on stage with the dance floor full of people out having a good time dancing to my music. I've had a couple bands with twin fiddles and a steel guitar, played one time on a concert with a 14 piece Western Swing band, two other fiddle players and me, twin steels, horn men -- the whole deal. I was the vocalist and one of the triple fiddle players. A thousand people out dancing to our music. Now I just play once or twice a month at the geezer jams where a bunch of us old guys get together and play the music we love. Other geezers come and dance. But I'm teaching my little friend Savanna to play backup fiddle and guitar. Maybe she and her generation will keep it going. I've taught at fiddle camp a couple times, that's pretty fun, too.

I'm playing a Peerless Custom Arch top with a Venetian cutaway through a Genz Benz 300 ProLT Acoustic and a Scott Cao Amati fiddle through an Acoustic Image on stage, play my old Martins at home but I don't take them on the road anymore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 02:43 am:

This is the top on that guitar. Purty ain't it??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 02:53 am:

It just doesn't get any better than that, Stan. Very very cool. Beautiful f-hole arch top there, too. Do you have any of your music online I could check out?

My great uncle is named Stan and up until about ten years ago or so he custom, hand-made mandolins and fiddles mostly (and a few guitars) called, appropriately "Stan" instruments. As my grandpa tells it, he sold many of them to Grand ol' Opry folk.

A second cousin of mine, Rick Christensen, played one of his fiddles for Tom T. Hall back in the 70s and early 80s for a time.

I love all music. In the past few years I have begun learning to really appreciate true bluegrass music. The history behind it just fascinates me and helps me to appreciate it even more. Bluegrass is one of the earliest roots of almost all American music made today. Southern black blues runs a close second.

I can go from listening to Flatt and Scruggs to Leon Redbone to Metallica all in the same night...grin..

I have smooth jazz playing on my underground radio station as I type this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sam "POPS" Humphries on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 06:52 am:

Ham Radio-WA4KKV since 1972, Wood turning, tending 50 rose bushes, watching old movies, and naturally tinkering with the Model T.

I also have a great deal of vintage lionel trains and accessories.

Here are pics of the turning I have done and Eleanor has taken as her's.

Samt 1t 2t 3t 4t6t7t8


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Ashton Rosenkrans on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 10:00 am:

I'm into a number of things besides work, otherwise I'd go nuts. Model A and Early V8 Fords, Aviation history, model building (mostly 1/72 aircraft), WWII living history, 40's swing dance, 4th degree black-belt in Tang Soo Do karate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Sullivan, Powell WY on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 10:10 am:

Fly fisher, fly tyer, rod builder and rebuilder. Father of 4, which utterly wipes out the prior sentence.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Holcomb, Watertown WI on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 10:12 am:

Let's see...
Model T's, model A's, V-8 flathead cars, Volkswagens, 15 of them! Beer signs, Juke boxes, pinball machines, player pianos, Antique farm tractors and equipment, camping, camping lanterns, auctions, And I know I've forgotten something!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob from Nova Scotia on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 10:33 am:

Scotch Whisky and Cuban Cigars


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 10:40 am:

I collect nostalgic/historical Missouri Ozarks postcards and original photographs; books and ephemera connected with author Harold Bell Wright; books by Ozark writers and on Ozark history/culture; Anything from the “Purity Oil Company” of Springfield Missouri; original movie posters (mostly 1950-60s Disney and westerns); memorabilia connected with Branson, MO, history and tourism. Part of my collection is currently displayed at the Branson Centennial Museum (and my kids do not want any of my old junk when I’m gone).

I write Christian historical fiction novels (none published yet) and non-fiction historical articles for my hometown newspaper, the Houston Herald (of Houston, Missouri). I am currently writing articles about Sylvester Pattie and the first sawmill on Piney River; and Jesse James’s ride through Texas County, Missouri, in 1872.

I like camping, hiking, canoeing, and exploring wild caves. I am very interested in Biblical history and archeology. For many years, I have been researching my family history and genealogy. I have researched an unbroken lineage of the GUNTER family going back to the 1400s.

My wife told me long ago, “No more new hobbies unless you give up one.”


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 10:46 am:

Volunteer motorman (driver) for the two historic streetcar lines operated by the Edmonton Radial Railway Society in Edmonton, AB. http://www.edmonton-radial-railway.ab.ca/

The photos are my late Mum and me in front of ex-Osaka Japan #247 (1921), my driving partner Jim in front of Edmonton #33 (built St. Louis 1912), and Car #33 some 17 years, 35,000 volunteer hours and $151,000 earlier.

Our High Level Bridge line runs over the highest streetcar river crossing in the world, roughly the same height as Niagara Falls.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 11:34 am:

Guitars I always wanted to collect acoustic guitars. I wanted to own a Gibson, Gretsch, Guild, Martin and Taylor. I still have to get the Gretsch and Guild. I like to try to pick them when I get a chance. I use to do a lot of stained glass. Especially leaded. I repaired a lot of church windows and worked for a fellow that's been doing it for over 30 years. He taught me a lot but after the divorce my ex-wife got the glass studio and the tools. I also did a lot of woodworking. I rebuilt a '38 Ford pickup. All of it's gone now. I still do a lot of shooting handguns. My favorite is my Colt Officers. I just bought a medium format camera and started studying film and print development. I have a large walk-in closet in my house that would work very well for a dark room. My favorite though is my model t's. I'm learning and enjoying working on and driving them. I enjoy touring and being with Great Northern Model T Club members I also like polishing and driving my Corvette. And I like my animals. They're my companionship and have great personalities. Although there are a couple old veterans that live close and we get together just about every day and talk about anything but the war. I guess I'm not dedicated to any hobby. I just like burning my time as I want. Retirement is good. I do enjoy being on MTFCA and Facebook. I use to love to hunt but my health physical health is to the point where I can't hold up to it. A broken back and poorly healed broken leg took me out of that game. I'd love to find a dock somewhere to throw a fishing line in. I collected Marx trains and toys at one time but ran out of room so sold a lot of it and the rest is in the closet. I have several diecast and older tin toys. And I have a small collection of diecast farmall tractors. I also enjoy swapping stories and telling lies with my friends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 11:54 am:

For me, it's mostly electronic work. Here's Killovolt I, my homemade guitar amplifier:

Killovolt top panel
The top panel, consisting of all the tube sockets and the amplifier main board.

Killovolt bottom
Here's the bottom, consisting mainly of power supply components. Notice that I wound all the transformers myself. Saves a lot of money!

Killovolt I
And the finished amplifier, hooked up to a cheapy speaker.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way, Wa. on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 12:08 pm:

The Model T Snowmobile attachments have been in the four front of my T hobby, now going on 33 years.
In the past,model Airplanes (U control,Early radio control, model railroad HO,and of course some real railroad restoration narrow gage and logging. All has been fun and enlightening) Just enjoy tinkering with old things.

Bob
First snowmobile starter car

Org. and my clone.

Orig. rail car as found.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 12:30 pm:

Antique phonographs, scale model steam engines (building & collecting them), antique music boxes, old tools (to use, not just collect), antique radios (1920's) & rusty things.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 12:49 pm:

"Just enjoy tinkering with old things."
Bob, I think that's the ultimate statement for most of us. I just like old stuff --- like most of you, I have stuff I should get rid of, turn it in to money, but I dunno, I just like it. I've got old trucks, old tractors, old signs, old whatever and I just like to fool with it when I have time. I like new stuff, too, but I like "Tinkering with old things." Good on us all!! I'm amazed at the variety of things we are interested in and what we do with the hours not consumed with providing food and shelter for ourselves and those under our protection and care.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 12:56 pm:

Antique machinery like hit and miss engines and old tractors. Also like live steam. I do not own any steam engines other than models, but will some day. The whole family has been to school on steam operation and volunteer annually at the Old Threshers Reunion in Denton, NC.

One of my other hobbies is not so politically correct, so I will refrain from bringing it up. Let's just say I am prepared.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 02:34 pm:

Stan down here in Texas as far as Western Swing goes 'Asleep at the Wheel' is the best thing going. All of the folks in the band are accomplished musicians and just plain good. The band leader is Ray Benson who is 6'7" and all Texan in every way. They do a great job with 'Route 66'. They are the Bob Wills band of this Generation as far as I'm concerned.
That Peerless looks really nice by the way!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Cook on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 02:50 pm:

What a versatile bunch of people! I have a collection of guitars (mostly Martin's) and fiddles and 5 string banjos. Have worked with the same bunch of guys playing music for a living for the last five years.http://www.myspace.com/chriscookcountry Had the the pleasure of driving of driving the Ford to a couple of close gigs recently. Chris.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 02:53 pm:

Daniel,

Kinda, that picture was was taken near Saline Valley rd going east towards it. Saline and Death Valley are on my favorite places to ride.

My first trip to the hot springs was two years ago and all I can say is "Dude cover your junk"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 04:29 pm:

Chris has a great CD that I played a couple songs from on my radio show not too long after I got it. He's the bard of Australia.

John, I've known the Wheel for years -- through their good times and some not so good. Dennis Ludiker, a hot fiddle player from Spokane is their go-to fiddle player when Jason Roberts is off doing his own music. Known him since he was born.

One time years ago, Ramblin' Jack Elliot was spending a week or two sobering up at my cabin and we went to Bozeman to see the Wheel as some joint they were playing. We hadn't been in the door 30 seconds when Ray saw us and stopped right in the middle of the song and said on the mic, "What are you two sorry bas-----s doing here?" They didn't get me up to sing but they didn't even finish the song and got Jack up to sing. That was the end of Jack being sober for a few days. It was the start of an all night party with Jack, Ray and the rest of the Wheel. I'm still in love with the chick singer they had working with them even tho I can't think of her name right now. Katherine McPhee was with them last time I saw them about a year ago. She is pretty wonderful.

I love that music. "No matter who's in Austin, Bob Wills is still the King."

Played a show at Pearl's in Fort Worth about 5 or 6 years ago with Randy Brown, Dickey Overbey, Jake Hooker, Tommy Alverson and some other guys, a benefit for a steel man that had fallen on bad health and hard times. Randy's recorded a couple of my songs and invited me to come down to his CD release party that was on the same day as the benefit. Lotsa fun.

I'm in love with Amber Digby and her music. Went from the Chickasha swap meet to Mingus, Texas several years ago when she came out with her first album just to meet her and listen to her sing. She is my favorite girl singer. Bobby Flores is my favorite singer right after Ray Price. That's my kind of music.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 04:41 pm:

By the way, John, did you know that Ray Benson is from Philadelphia and moved to Austin from San Francisco where he was being a hippy and playing swing guitar with Don Burnham and some of the other rebels in the 60's??? Yup. After they moved to Texas they were living on some abandoned farm that didn't have plumbing. They were looking for a name for the band and one of the band guys was sitting in the smallest building on the farm but the most useful and he all of a sudden came running out of there pulling up his pants and yelling "Asleep at the Wheel." It stuck. At least that's the story Ray tells.

Chris, I have a D35S-1975, a D28-1963, a 00017-1934 that was a gift from the Louise Massey family (My Adobe Hacienda) & a D-16 Custom-1994. The D16 I won from American Songwriter Magazine for being Amateur Songwriter of the Year in 1994. It's only been out of the case probably 20 times in all the years I've owned it. I also have a Mossman Timber Creek Custom that I won in another deal. I mostly play my Peerless's on the road, they are a lot more replaceable than my old Martins. I have a 1910 John F Stratton that is really a cool little guitar and several others including the 1939 Singing Cowboys Guitar that I bought myself for $4.50 when I was 9 years old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 04:51 pm:

I have my grandpas old Gibson he bought when he was 14.Gota have some bridge work done to it.Aint a real big guitar.I think it is a L? Aint sure.I might pop a picture of it and post,maby you all can remind me


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 05:07 pm:

Stan,

"No matter who's in Austin, Bob Wills is still the King."

Amen to that! I also like Milton Brown and his Musical Brownies, which as you probably know, got started with Bob Wills while they were both with the Light Crust Doughboys, (from the Burrus Mills). Have you heard Brown do "The Wheel of the Wagon is Broken"? I played that over and over when I was a kid. My mother absolutely hated it.

I should have added country & western swing to my other hobbies as well. Unfortunately, for me, my interest and abilities puts me on the other side of the microphone from where you stand Stan. I sure wish I could play. I can and do sing however, but it sounds terrible!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke Dahlinger on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 05:24 pm:

Danial,

I too was in an amateur metal band, during the early mid 90s.

Did my best with the bass, but as a whole we were never successful enough to play anywhere worthwhile. Hell none of us were of legal drinking age anyways.

We mostly did covers- I can still recall most of the setlist from one of our only 2 paying gigs.

1) Ministry - Just One Fix (Still a big Ministry fan)
2) Testament - Demonic Refusal
3) Ozzy - I Don't Know
4) Slayer- Seasons in the Abyss
5) Metallica- One
seems there were a couple more but can't remember them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 05:29 pm:

I've just started to upgrade in engine size:

It's one of a total of 9 diesel electric locomotives that was build by the danish locomotive factory "Frichs" as an all round locomotive for the danish private railroad companies. All 9 have survived and the local railroad club have two of them.
They are equipped with two 6 Cyl. 500 HP turbopowered diesel engines of Frichs on design and production, driving a generator each. The power from the generator feeds two electro motors in the boggies for traction.
The one engine in Litra M8 om the picture have been torn apart because it knocked and now they need help to get it back together. This is where I came in!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darren J Wallace on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 05:50 pm:

I restore antique music boxes and antique phonographs. I enjoy playing stand up bass in a rockabilly outfit. I also collect and play vintage electric basses from the 1960's.
I currently own:
1965 Mosrite "Ventures" model
1966 Vox Phantom IV
1963 Hofner Beatle bass
1958 Hofner 500/1
1967 Gibson EB-2
1951 Fender precision bass

Check out my rockabilly band on Youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGba2nuX25w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p26Sob_T5vM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpx_jhM_hH4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNL4jaORPpM&list=UULMzap2BsnvcS6DPshdM_dQ&index=1 &feature=plcp

I also am a tool and die machinist and make many parts for others in the hobbies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 05:58 pm:

I collect dust. I keep it under the bed, sofa, and on some shelves.

Stan, I too can listen to any type of music starting with Country, Classical, Blues, Rock, etc. It just depends on how empty the bottle of Jack D is as to what I listen to.

Back in the 60's and early 70's I sang in a folk group. We cut a couple of records and sold about 10 copies...the groups parents bought them I think.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 06:51 pm:

All this "Asleep at the Wheel" talk has me waxing nostalgic for the 70's here on Fayetteville's Dickson Street, specifically the Swingin' Door Saloon. The Wheel played at the Door a few times, and they were some of the most enjoyable concerts I ever attended. The Door was a fairly small place, and Ray Benson had to remove his 12-gallon hat to get on the stage. :-) They were always great, and the place was always packed when they were there. Delbert McClinton played there often, as well as many others I can't remember now. Come to think of it, there are a lot of things I can't remember about that time. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 07:55 pm:

Grounds Keeper. Not that I want to. Just more yard than I want. Want even less as I get older. Used to dabble in electronics. Now enjoy working on the antique cars. Building things such as tools to work on the cars, small antique replica car, speedster, depot hack (current project). Help wife with her hobby raising and showing small breed dogs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Amara on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 08:28 pm:

Here goes:
Accordion/Harmonica playing.
Toy Trains (Pre Postwar Lionel).
Ham Radio (Vintage and Modern).
Radio Control Airplanes/Helicopters/Cars.
Full-Scale Flying (1966 Piper Cherokee).
Vintage Motorcycle (1967 Aermacchi Sprint SS).
Shooting (Rifle and Pistol).
Married (36 years and counting).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 08:33 pm:

Mack Cole, That old Gibson is probably an old L1 flat top. You probably wouldn't want it real bad so go ahead and PM me and I'll send my address back. Then I'll go ahead and send you the money to send it to me and take it off your hands. After all it was those old Delta blues guys that liked to play those L1's and all they really ever did was drink a little canned heat and pick and sing. Canned heat is sterno. They use to strain it through bread and drink it. When you'd hear of someone with a name that started with Blind like Blind Lemon Jefferson or Blind Blake it was probably from drinking canned heat. So if you don't want to end up on some street corner down in Clarksdale Mississippi and making deals with the devil maybe you should send that guitar to me.
Ok, so that's another thing I like to do. Sit back and listen to good Delta blues. My favorite player is Blind Willie McTell. Tommy Johnson, Lonnie Johnson and of course Robert Johnson were some I like to listen to. Also Johnny Shine and Cnarlie Patton just to drop a few names. When Memphis Minnie recorded with Blind willie McTell in Chicago some real music was made. I love those Blues.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 09:02 pm:

Am I the only one here who collects grenades?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 09:09 pm:

I have the rifle and Gibson guitar that my grandpal took with him when he and a few other fellows rode to tennesee from statesville nc on horse back when he was 17.
Both have some scuffs,he didnt have a case for the gibson till in the 80's.
But I do want to get it fixed.Forgive the storage room :>)



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 09:14 pm:

Gustaf,Uh if there is any grenades around here,you are welcome to them sir!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 10:21 pm:

Mack, my guess is your guitar is a depression era J45 jumbo. It's very sought after because it's a solid wood guitar. It's a kind of a plain instrument though the majority of them were made with a sunburst finish. Your's obviously isn't a sunburst but the purfling gives it away. If it doesn't need major repairs it's probably worth a minimum of $2000.00 to start with. You should find a good luthier and have them look at it. The older Gibsons are very much in demand because they have a very distinctive sound. I'm very envious of you for having such a beauty. Hang on to it and treat it with care.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 10:28 pm:

(Note to self - Self, never tick off Gustaf.)

Love that vintage Gibson, Mack. Cool back story, too.

Great set there, Luke. I may be verging on being an old fart now, but I still consider Metallica's "Master of Puppets" album to be the greatest metal album of all time. Saw them live in about 85 or 86 in Stuttgart, West Germany about a month before Cliff Burton died in the bus roll-over. They were opening for Deep Purple. (Another great act)

You ever listen to Metal Church? If you haven't, check out their album "The Dark" on You Tube. Great stuff for the metal fan.

Every now and then, I do a metal show on my radio station and play a lot of old school and new school hard rock. Tonight is smooth jazz night.

www.offbeatradio.listen2myradio.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 10:33 pm:

Mike, I had a Gibson classical guitar in the mid 70s that to this day, had a sound I have not heard duplicated by any guitar. I bought it used from a mom and pop music center. The sound was pure golden honey when you plucked the gut strings. Sad to say, I traded it for a couple bottles of Jack Daniels when I was in high school.

I learned my first chords on that thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 11:21 pm:

Drift alert!

All the mentions of Texas music made me think of Don Walser, one of the people I miss.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Cook on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 11:34 pm:

Mac, love your Gibson but it looks like it needs to be played!!! Mike, might be smaller than a Jumbo or may just be the photo. I once owned a Kalamazoo that was about this size. I haven't seen many Gibsons of that era in this finish. Chris.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 12:59 am:

Don Walser was great. The fiddle player in the background is Howard Kalish, great Austin fiddler. Don's favorite joke. "Feeling kind of bad this morning, I lost my wife." Ray Benson, "That's terrible Don, did she leave you much?" "Four, five times a week when we wasn't gettin' along too good."

Told that on every show I ever saw him on. Friend of mine, Terry Michaels played steel for Don for a couple years. He had a great time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep NZ on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 01:02 am:

i wish i could collect grenades...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 01:08 am:

I like doing this. This is the same pic as posted under Spoke Fun (or whatever)

.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 01:10 am:

I agree with Chris. I've never seen a J45 that wasn't sunburst. I think that is a smaller guitar than a J45. The J45 is a slope shoulder guitar that came out after Gibson dropped the gold "Only a Gibson is good enough." pennant on the head stock. The J 45 also had a longer pick guard. Mack's Gibson has the older standard teardrop pick guard.

From Wiki: The J-45 is generally regarded as Gibson's most famous and widely used acoustic guitar model. Introduced in 1942 with a list price of $45, it was conceived as a replacement for the earlier J-35 model, which was an inexpensive, Great Depression-era flattop guitar. The J-45 initially only varied slightly from the discontinued J-35. Some of the changes were internal, such as strengthened bracing, while exterior changes included the new teardrop shaped pickguard, and a headstock decal with the Gibson logo replacing the old stark white 'Gibson' silk-screen logo of the thirties, and the slogan "Only a Gibson Is Good Enough." The J-45 also had a more rounded, "baseball bat" style neck, as opposed to the "V" shape of the J-35 neck. Introduced during World War II, the J-45 standardized Gibson's approach to the dreadnought guitar. The J-45 produced by Gibson today is substantially similar to the 1942 model.
Cosmetically, the J-45 was understated, intended as a durable no-frills "workhorse guitar" (its nickname given by the manufacturer). The binding was simple, the soundhole ring was austere, and the neck sported modest dot-shaped mother of pearl fretboard position markers. Gibson typically used the sunburst finish to cover up imperfections in the wood used on instruments, since it made the majority of the top of the guitar black. The J-45 was constructed of solid (as opposed to laminated) spruce wood for the top, while solid mahogany was used for the back and sides. In the intervening years though, the Gibson sunburst has become iconic to the degree that collectors prefer the J-45 to the higher end J-50s of the same era. Apart from a small batch of natural-finish J-45s produced in 1942, the model was offered only in the sunburst finish.

In my experience J45's are worth 2-10,000 depending on how they sound and what they look like, earlier flat top Gibsons are worth much less, especially the smaller ones. I'd put them in the range of $400-1000 for all but the rarest


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 01:14 am:

I agree with Chris. I've never seen a J45 that wasn't sunburst. I think that is a smaller guitar than a J45. The J45 is a slope shoulder guitar that came out after Gibson dropped the gold "Only a Gibson is good enough." pennant on the head stock. The J 45 also had a longer pick guard. Mack's Gibson has the older standard teardrop pick guard.

From Wiki: The J-45 is generally regarded as Gibson's most famous and widely used acoustic guitar model. Introduced in 1942 with a list price of $45, it was conceived as a replacement for the earlier J-35 model, which was an inexpensive, Great Depression-era flattop guitar. The J-45 initially only varied slightly from the discontinued J-35. Some of the changes were internal, such as strengthened bracing, while exterior changes included the new teardrop shaped pickguard, and a headstock decal with the Gibson logo replacing the old stark white 'Gibson' silk-screen logo of the thirties, and the slogan "Only a Gibson Is Good Enough." The J-45 also had a more rounded, "baseball bat" style neck, as opposed to the "V" shape of the J-35 neck. Introduced during World War II, the J-45 standardized Gibson's approach to the dreadnought guitar. The J-45 produced by Gibson today is substantially similar to the 1942 model.
Cosmetically, the J-45 was understated, intended as a durable no-frills "workhorse guitar" (its nickname given by the manufacturer). The binding was simple, the soundhole ring was austere, and the neck sported modest dot-shaped mother of pearl fretboard position markers. Gibson typically used the sunburst finish to cover up imperfections in the wood used on instruments, since it made the majority of the top of the guitar black. The J-45 was constructed of solid (as opposed to laminated) spruce wood for the top, while solid mahogany was used for the back and sides. In the intervening years though, the Gibson sunburst has become iconic to the degree that collectors prefer the J-45 to the higher end J-50s of the same era. Apart from a small batch of natural-finish J-45s produced in 1942, the model was offered only in the sunburst finish.

In my experience J45's are worth 2-10,000 depending on how they sound and what they look like, earlier flat top Gibsons are worth much less, especially the smaller ones. I'd put them in the range of $400-1000 for all but the rarest


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 01:15 am:

Those are the coolest pens I have ever seen in my life!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 01:22 am:

Mike, if you like Memphis Minnie you should check out a guy named Michael Hurwitz. He has a great song called "When Minnie Sang the Blues" on his Chrome on the Range CD. It was on my best ten songs of the year list three or four years ago on my radio shows and I still have people call and ask me to play it. He's from Alta, Wyoming, great writer and stylist. He might be on you tube or not but I know he has a web site.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 01:30 am:

Hey Stan! You're up late! Time to hit the bed. Tomorrow (today) is another T-day. You're not 25 anymore. Sleep tight ol' buddy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 04:07 am:

Stan and Chris, You're right it's not a J45. Actually it may be a very rare 1942 LG1. Though it was a lower line of Gibsons they're quite rare because only about 100 were built in 1942 that had the gold script and the "only a Gibson is good enough" banner. The line was dropped until after the war was over and when they started making them again in 1946 They didn't put the banner back on and they put a sunburst finish on them. The 1942 had the solid spruce top. The guitar is still a solid wood guitar. The purfling is still correct as is the style of bridge and the single circle inlay around the sound hole. Check out the attached photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 04:22 am:

Cleaned up and repaired if necessary with new strings and properly setup the value would still start at around $1500.00+. I still think it would be wise to take it to a luthier. It's as much a piece of history as a model t and deserves to be made right. I don't know how old your Grandpa was in 1942 but if he bought it after '42 it would substantiate my information even more. Your LG1 is still an excellent blues guitar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 04:30 am:

Oh Mack, one other thing, then I'm going to bed, I've got what I think is an old model K briggs and stratton motor on an air compressor I bought a few months back at an auction. I've been spending time tearing it down to get some spark out of it. I need to find a replacement coil for it. Or at least take the one that's on there and put a new plug wire on it and then find a new condenser. I'm pretty convinced I can make it run. The shroud on the motor (over the flywheel) is a real heavy cast piece instead of tin.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 05:29 am:

I like most everything old- cars, trucks, tractors, heavy equipment, steam engines, etc.,etc. Many years ago, I realized that I had to narrow down my interests to just one thing, Model T's. I still enjoy looking at everything else, I just can't afford to collect them! Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 06:09 am:

The coils for that vintage K are getting hard to come by.DONT solder the spark plug wire,just clean the terminal and twist it carefully.Spark will find it's way out of there by the wire.I aint sure on the condensor as far as mfd but 1 from a later engine modified slightly should do the job.
These K's and Q's share the same coil as the PB and other VERY old Briggs engines so nos parts are rare and no reproduction as I know of.
Mine has the cast shroud.heavy engine.I have to get help to set it up on the bench.
Also,Music was a hobby of mine till I got to working a regular job.Then I slacked off and when I got hurt,it has interfered with holding my left arm to cord.That is why I cried when I found out Mom's 34 Gibson lap steel and some other insturments were stolen from her when she got sick.I mighta could played that.
If you remember in the early 90's there was a blue grass band Common Ground.They made 1 cd and then a couple of them went to building houses and didnt have to time to practice,so they got mad and broke up.The bass player now is with Deeper Shade of Blue.
Anyhow,when Mike,glen and his uncle started picking music in the late 80's I tried to play guitar.I had took lessons from Ned Mullis for a couple years.IF only I coulda played like him.He could play any song anytime with your choice of glove on his left hand to make cords with.Amazing,thread drift I know.
I have a 1983 sunburst Fender strat,1 of the last handmade 1's.Aint been played 20 times since new.Gibson Heritage,and a couple others.

LG 1,that sounds like what I heard years ago.
I will have to check on grandpals birthday.I have his drivers license in the radio room.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike dixon on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 06:51 am:

i have about 20 collectible cars, in a 10,000 ft warehouse, one end houses a consignment auction, once a week, i have 50 rental houses, a sheep farm, im way too busy, oh my real job is the heating cooling business 30 years now, oh, teach a heating cooling class one nite a week too, at our shop im way to busy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sosnoski on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 08:42 am:

I started working on full size trolley, subway and elevated equipment at the Shoreline Trolley Museum in East Haven CT. when I turned 18. Became a motorman, conductor and ticket agent. Ran the cars for the public the first year, them moved into the shop when operations ended for the season. Spent virtually every weekend working there for the next 13 years. Worked on track, overhead wire, buildings, rebuilding the trestles, and on the cars. "My" car was Brooklyn Rapid Transit convertible elevated car #1349. It was built in 1906 by the Cincinnati Car Co. and ran on the elevated railways in New York until the early 1960's. I overhauled the two electric motors and rebuilt one side of the car. I also worked on Montreal Tramways rotary snow plow #5. This had been disassembled back in the 60's and abandoned. I located all of the pieces, reinstalled the electrical equipment and got it to move under it's own power again.

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/Locopicture.aspx?id=105157
http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/ObjView/86053021.jpg

Eventually I moved to Massachusetts, met my wife and the trolley museum kind of faded out. Around this time I began building O scale models of trolley cars - with the thought that some day I would have a trolley layout. I scratch built several cars - not from kits but built up from individual pieces of styrene. I used the plans for actual cars, then freelanced the design as I went along to make my own version.
Trolley Model
Trolley


I also collect antique tools. I started collecting tools in general and at one time had over 350 pieces. I decided I liked the wooden planes the best and would focus on those. Even wooden planes is a large category, so while I still collect various planes, I try to focus on 18th century planes which are imprinted with a makers mark.
Tools

I now spend most of my time doing software engineering, making parts for Model T's, running my kids around to wherever they need to go, and researching Model T's.

Dave S.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sosnoski on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 09:17 am:

Here's my guitar story - sorry it's so long. I started playing piano when I was 6 and tool lessons until I was in college. I always like the sound of the acoustic guitar. When my wife passed away in 2003 I decided I was going to learn the guitar. Went to the music store which had a whole room dedicated to guitars. Told them I was going to learn guitar and needed one, that I knew nothing about them but knew what sound I wanted. Took one sales person who knew how to play into the room and had him play every guitar there. After 2 hours I settled on a used Guild D4-HG.

Guitar

Took it home and tried to learn to play. I have very large fingers and had a lot of trouble holding down individual strings. I would play with it for a while, get frustrated and give it up, then come back several months later and try again. Eventually I just gave up altogether.

A few years ago I was working on the table saw, and in a moment of not paying attention I ran my left hand through the blade. It went through the index finger and 3/4 the way through the thumb. Lost the index finger but they were able to save the thumb by putting a metal pin in and fusing the remains of the bones together. The result is that I no longer have a knuckle joint in the thumb, so the thumb doesn't bend anymore.

A few years ago we went to see REO Speedwagon in concert. Kevin Cronin was playing "Time for me to Fly" on the acoustic 12 string and I noticed he was holding the guitar strange. At home I watched some videos of him playing this song, then did some research on what he was doing. He uses a 12 string tuned to an open D tuning (D major chord with all strings open). He uses his index finger to bar the chords, but because the neck is so wide, he reaches over the top with his thumb to pick up the top strings. After thinking about it for a few minutes, I though I could do that. Dug out the guitar and tuned it to an open D tuning and it worked - sort of.

The open D tuning is D-A-D-F#-A-D. To make a minor chord, you have to drop the third a half step - in this case the F# to an E. The problem is that if you have your finger across all of the strings, you can't drop the middle string one fret. Plus, since I was using my middle finger to bar the chord, I was missing the index finger which I would need to lower that string. The solution was instead of reaching around the bottom of the neck, I reach over the top of the neck. I can now bar the chord with the middle finger, then use the ring finger to lower the string to get the minor chord.

The next problem I ran into was that with this tuning, the third is the middle string. I can strum all strings for the major chord, but to get the minor chord I could only strum the top 4 strings. This made the minor chord sound not as full as the major chord. Plus, with all the strings open you get a D chord, but a lot of songs need the C chord. The "fix" was to change to an open C tuning C-G-C-G-C-E. This puts the third on the lowest string, which means all the strings are used for the major and minor chords. I can also get the sus2 buy dropping the lowest string 2 frets, or get the sus4 by barring the strings with the ring finger and using the middle finger to raise the lowest string 1 fret.

It actually works pretty well.

Dave S.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 10:28 am:

Dave, you met the challenge and overcame. Good for you. Your story is somewhat familiar to me. When my brother was in Viet Nam he was a M-60 gunner in the Marines. One day they got into a firefight and his Assistant Gunner and him went into a crater and setup. Charlie dropped a mortar into it and his A.G. took most of the blast and was killed instantly. My brother was hit in the back, shoulder and left elbow and the shrapnel destroyed the Ulna (sp) nerve in his arm and he lost the use and the feeling of three fingers in his left hand. About 10 years ago he was cutting a board with a circle saw. He was holding the board with the thumb and pointer finger of his left hand and had no idea where his useless fingers were on his left hand. As he was sawing, Well, you can imagine what happened. But I'm very proud of him and his ability to adapt. Though he of course didn't have use of those fingers he's still had to adapt to them being gone. He's nearly 66 years old and has driven truck his entire life. He's one of those that can't seem to find his way out of the truck. But to watch him work and do the things he needs to do causes me to be pretty proud of him. What's left of his hand is strong. He's got a grip that'll bring tears to your eyes. Because of his ability to figure things around his situation I can imagine in my mind what you must go through. Going to Open C was a great idea because of the bar chords that are used. When I pick blues I go to drop d and finger pick. When the stings are all in line on the same frets it's easy for me to fool people into thinking I can actually play.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sosnoski on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 11:49 am:

Thanks Mike. I had my hand bandaged up and the pin in my thumb for about 6 weeks. Actually went to Hershey like that (nothing gets in the way of Hershey!). Once I got the pin out it only took about 3 days before I was able to do just about anything without even thinking about it. Anything you can do with your index finger and thumb you can do just as well with your middle finger and thumb. I can still play the piano. I didn't even have to relearn that - just sat down and started to play (although I do have to sometimes drop a note from a chord in the left had as I just don't have enough fingers to play them all). Last year I fractured the middle finger on the same hand. That actually caused me more problems than the missing finger. But as my girlfriend said - "At least you didn't break that one off". :-)

Dave S.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders-Auburn Al on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 12:17 pm:

Barry Abernathy plays the banjo with no fingers on his left hand. I saw him several years ago when he played with Doyle Lawson...He can sure play!
Bob

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jc0eU8EsJvg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 02:53 pm:

One of the greatest Jazz guitar players in the 40's and 50's was Dejhango Rhienhardt if I got the name right.
He was missing either one or 2 fingers on his left hand( his fretting hand by the way).
He was really good and a contempary of Les Paul or around that time.
Les Paul had his right arm set in a playing position so he could still play after a car accident where he suffered physical injuries.
Amazing what people can do when they have a mind to.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 03:13 pm:

David: I'm not surprised you had to scratch build your trolley's. I was surprised the same way years back when a friend asked about setting up a layout with a short run for a subway train. There was nothing available in any scale. We talked about converting (possibly) box cars but he's not that handy and I wasn't that willing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 04:18 pm:

Looks like this thread has morphed into a guitar string...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 04:31 pm:

Ralph,

Very good, I like that!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 06:34 pm:

Well after some effort since my other computer croaked,I found my website thingy I have had for a while.Feel free to look around and join,post,whatever.
http://mackcole.multiply.com/
This way I wont clutter up the page here with photos of all my hobby stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 07:57 pm:

Here are a few pens that I just made. The one on the left is an actual 50 Cal casing. The one on the right is from an old (rotten) Model T Spoke. Two are from Myrtle Wood and two from an old Oak Burl.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep NZ on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 10:17 pm:

How come you people lead interesting lives?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 10:48 pm:

"We're the most interesting men in the world."

XX


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 10:52 pm:

Kep,Idle minds are workshops of the devil.You gota keep your mind busy or you will worry to much about things you cant change.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep NZ on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 01:09 am:

But how did you achieve it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 02:14 am:

Tractors.......OLD tractors......none of that new 30's and 40's stuff....... :-)

Old stuff


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 02:47 am:

I don't know if any of us are the most interesting men in the world, but I do know that I am the center of the known universe.

Hope that helps, Kep.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 09:11 am:

Kep,I had a low paying job,still liveing at home at 18 at the time.Started collecting antique stuff that was free or cheap.As time went by I was able to trade up to a little better stuff.My T's are built from parts I have be able to trade and barter for or buy cheap.
The radios I restore are bought in poor condition in the free to 20 dollar range then restored as budget allows.Some of the garden tractors and engines I restore were given to me by friends that knew I would fix them and preserve them.others I bought for cheap.I am willing to do the extra few hours of work to rework something that is rough,where as some folks have more money than time.
Now that I am disability retired and on a limited income,I work on neighbors stuff for a little money or for stuff they have that I want.My insurance settlement from my accident a few years ago built my shop and the tools I didnt have.It has been a good investment as working in there is much cheaper than theropy.:>)
It can be done,you have to be resourcefull.Help your neighbors, and you wont lack for what you really need or want.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 11:41 am:

I have been collecting gems and minerals for 53 years and have been a gem and mineral dealer since 1976. Here's a few photos of our booth space at a local gem and mineral club show last month. About a third of our stock of specimens have been mined by my wife and me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 12:26 pm:

Fabulous photos there Jay !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Mullis on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 12:58 pm:

Here's my ultimate hobby
its called being Pawpaw.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 02:40 pm:

Very nice, Michael. I couldn't agree more. I have two granddaughters. great pic there.

@ jay - Hey do you ever do the Gem and Mineral show in Eugene? We go to that every time it comes around. If you're going to be there next time, I'll stop by and introduce myself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 03:53 pm:

Jay sent me a moon rock. A real one!!! How is that for cool??

Jay, do you have any eastern Montana moss agate??? Two of my brothers used to cut them up and make jewelry from agate. It was a real craze when I was about high school age. Haven't seen much of it for years. I have a friend in Great Falls, Jim Rambur, who cuts Yogo sapphires for a living. He is just swamped all the time. I'll bet you have seen him at gem shows. Nice guy.

Michael, there's a reason to celebrate Thanksgiving right there. A healthy, happy, pretty granddaughter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 04:50 pm:

Stan - My Mom has been a lapidary for most of my life. She (and my late Dad to some degree) was cutting and polishing stones when I was a kid. On vacations from Chicago, traveling out west here where my folks eventually retired, I remember stopping at several locations enroute, doing the "rockhound" thing with my folks. A favorite area was around Terry, Montana as I recall, for what was one of my Mom's favorites, Montana Moss Agate. (hmmm..........to this day, I can still taste the horrible water at a campground we stayed at near Glendive). I never really did get into the hobby, so am not up to date with what rocks and minerals can be found, and where, nowadays, however, I remember my folks talking years ago about the fact that it was no longer possible (even then) to stop and pick up Montana Moss Agate as most of their old favorite "rockhound" areas had become closed to the public. I suppose nowadays, the answer is, ya' gotta' know somebody. Like maybe an ol' Model "T" guy that has a ranch in Eastern Montana!....ha,ha! Anyway, you and Jay and this thread kinda' "struck a nerve" with me and brought back some old memories,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 05:26 pm:

Danial ,We have never done the show in Eugene and have been sticking to more local events these days.

Stan, I had a stash of 20 pounds or so of Montana Moss Agate many years ago that were purchased in an old rock collection and I might still have a slab or two here.

We have also been Meteorite dealers and collectors since the mid 1980's.

Here's a basket of 20 kilos of individual stone meteorite specimens that are all from the same fall (NWA 869 ,goggle this). We let visitors stand in the basket so they can say they have stood on an asteroid!



Harold, I am glad to hear I helped spark some fond old memories for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 06:05 pm:

Jay - Me too! Here's another one:

Again, as a young kid, with my parents on a rockhound field trip someplace in New Jersey I believe, I found a huge (at that time) plate of Celestite crystals a couple feet long. We were there with a club of quite a number of "rockhounds" as I remember, and I really thought I was pretty important, as I found by far the biggest Celestite specimen of the day. Only reason that I was the one who found it was because it was in a sort of crevice under a ledge, and as a small kid, I was the only one small enough to crawl in there and find it and pull it out! I remember not too long after that, my folks found out that due to the size of this plate of Celestite crystals, it ended up in some sort of a museum. Oh yeah,....I be kool, right? ........harold

P.S. This memory prompted me to do a bit of internet research on Celestite, and lo & behold, wherever that specimen I that found back in the early '50's is today, I'm sure it's no longer considered very big!....oh well......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 06:17 pm:

Jay,does this look like a piece of a meteorite to you? It came out of a coal mine here in western Pa. It has about the same weight as a hunk of lead of the same size.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 06:27 pm:

Dale - I'll bet Jay will know for sure, but with my limited (very limited) knowledge, it looks like Galena mixed with something else. Those little perfectly flat surfaces make me think of Galena which always has that characteristic. Metalic tho' for sure due to the weight, huh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 06:55 pm:

Dale, I believe what you have is man made and appears to be ferro silicate. The melted surface in your second photo is the tip off that it's a furnace product.
I have a collection of "meteor wrongs" here that I use in lectures to help show people the differences between earth rock and space rock. I have several pieces of furnace products such as yours in that collection.

Harold, To this day kids still manage to out do adults when it comes to finding treasures out rock-hounding.
Ohio limestone quarries have produced huge celestite specimens especially around Clay Center


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 07:16 pm:

Harold, in Montana the river beds to the high water mark are open to the public regardless of who owns the surrounding land. In most areas this means that the hunting of rock specimens, fishing, camping, etc., cannot not be prohibited by the owner of the land along the banks of the river. (Camping is the most easily restricted--it's a long story full of court cases) You can hunt agates in eastern Montana and the Calypso Bridge (see Herman & Freida/Freida learns to drive for a photo of the Calypso Bridge) which crosses the Yellowstone on the old Milwaukee railroad bed is the starting point for many agate hunters every spring when the water goes down enough to expose the rocks that have been disturbed during the winter. Custer creek is also a popular spot. It was always difficult to reach due to their being no road along the Milwaukee in that area but now that the old rail bed is the county road it is easy to get to and many agate hunters scour the mouth of Custer creek where it joins the Yellowstone. Hunting rock above the fence is prohibited due to it being on private land.

That IS the WORST tasting water in the state. I've tasted it, too. They probably have better water now, there is a water supply line off the river system.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 07:18 pm:

My first thought was Galena too.
Grandma call leftovers from the furnace "clinkers", and yes the end of it does look like one.

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 07:34 pm:

Jay - Makes sense about kids "outdoing" adults on rockhounding. After all, their eyes are younger and closer to the ground, right? Ha,ha,.....harold

P.S. Not to totally lead this thread further "OT", but of all of the "rockhound" activities I've done, I think my favorites were sapphires in Western Montana, Moss Agates in Eastern Montana, and my favorite of all was always hunting Lake Superior Agates along the north shore of Lake Superior! I'll bet other "T" guys and their families on this forum have done some of that too!

Yeah, I know; this is supposed to be about MY hobbies, however, I have to say, even tho' it was my Mom's hobby, it does seem to "rub off" somewhat, because to this day, I can't walk very far across any rocky area (including RR ballast when I was still working on the RR) without looking down to see what I might find.

Speaking of Lake Superior, we used to get Thompsonite nodules in one location on the north shore of Lake Superior too. That is until some "knothead" decided that "dynamiting" those large boulders for the Thompsonites therein would be more productive! Of course, because of that, the area has been closed to the public now for many years!

My Mom set some of the Thompsonites in gold (bracelet, brooch and ear rings) and that set was featured with her article and a full cover photo on the Lapidary Journal back in the '60's or '70's. (Memory not the best anymore) O.K.,...enough,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 07:51 pm:

Stan - Sounds like a couple good reasons for a "float trip". If ya' can't catch fish, you could float near the river bank and do the "rockhound" thing. Boy! There's one my Dad never thought of, or we'd have done it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 07:54 pm:

Jay, did you get in on that meteor that landed in Gold country early this year, or last? It was on local tv news here.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 08:14 pm:

I've been collecting Lake Superior Agates since I was old enough to tell what the a couple years I was polishing them with a small tumbler and gave them to kids. I actually live in an area that is part of the state where the majority of the agates lay. We're on one end and it runs from here over to a town called Moose Lake. There are people around here that have some pretty extensive collections. Moose Lake has a celebration every year that's dedicated to Lake Superior Agates. They actually take a dump truck loaded with agates and coins. Then they dump the load down the street in a long layer and the kids all run in and pick the coins out of the agates. I read at one time the heaviest Lake superior agate weighed around, as I recall, 105 pounds. I think the biggest I ever found was about 5 lbs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 08:54 pm:

Ralph, Yes That would be the Sutter's Mill Meteorite fall of April 22, 2012. And yes I was there the next day along with a bunch of other people and spent a week back and forth to the Coloma Gold Discovery State Park where a majority of the fragments were found. Just about every Meteorite dealer I know converged on the site and were paying $1000 a gram to finders since the material was a very rare type of primitive Carbonaceous Chondrite that has organized organic molecules in it as well as nano diamonds. Less then a kilo of this material has been found from this fall to date. Well needless to say I didn't find a piece myself but did manage to buy a tenth of a gram crumb for our collection. If you would like to find out more on this meteorite fall Goggle Sutter's Mill Meteorite.

Mike, Thanks for your story on Lake Superior Agates. We don't see to many out here on the west coast.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Crane on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 09:15 pm:

Mike Garrison

Two T's and a vette. My collection too. Anybody ever have any Petoskey stones? I'm from Michigan, Interesting thread wondering from airplanes to guitars to rocks and now back to Model T's.
Do the Metroite guys have UFOs too?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 09:15 pm:

Jay you're welcome. I sent my uncle by Tillamook Oregon 2 or 3 pounds of stones last summer. I have no idea what he'll do with them. He was making silver jewelry years ago. I think he told me something about giving his tools to a friend. I also sent him a bag full of natural turquoise and some other stones called Apache Tears. I think it was Apache anyway. I'm having a little bit of a brain fart trying to remember for sure right now.

We have an outstanding Rock Shop in Princeton MN. They have a really nice selection of stones and tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 09:26 pm:

Well, I guess I might as well wade into this one, too. Besides Model A and T Fords, my main passion is collecting original World War One German soldier photographs, 1914-1918. As history is no longer taught in public schools, I must hasten to point out that this is the Kaiser Wilhelm II era, NOT the Nazi Germany of a generation later. The photos I prefer were taken in photographic studios at Ausmarschzeit (literally "marching out time", meaning when the soldiers were leaving for the Front) and were mostly turned into cabinet photos mounted on cardboard, smaller CDV's and/or picture postcards sent from the soldiers to their loved ones back in Germany throughout the War with updates on their lives and health. Surprisingly, I'd say only 1% or less of these writings even mention the War. The soldiers instead express concerns about their families and children at home, what their fellow buddy soldiers are up to and complaints about the always lousy weather. Many just want the War to end so that they can go back home. Sound like what an American soldier might write? Fascinating reading, snooping into private writings almost a century old, but one needs to know how to speak/read German, especially the older Suetterlin and Kurrent handwriting of the era. Studio backgrounds vary from boring curtains or plain walls to exotic alpine scenes. It depended upon how much you wanted to pay the photographer!
The larger photographic example depicts a soldier from one of the Prussian Guard Grenadier regiments in 1914, while the smaller one shows a Baden infantryman from the 109th Regiment. Maybe they fought against your Doughboy grandfather in 1918??? By the way, the spike on top of the helmet (Pickelhaube) represents ancient Roman soldier spear tips. It was not intended to be used as a ramming weapon against the enemy. In fact, the spike worked against the German soldier in WWI trench warfare by revealing his presence as he slowly stuck his head up over the parapet. BANG!!! One less Heinie on the Western Front! :-)
MarshallGerman soldierGerman soldier 2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Prince Madras, Oregon on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 09:29 pm:

I am into old vehicles, blacksmithing, black powder, stained glass, model trains (z,n and ho), wood working and Oregon history so far, who knows what is next. Those of you that play musical instrament have my respect, I can't even play the radio but I love listening to music, especially live music of almost all kinds.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 09:40 pm:

Interesting, Marshall.

My step-great grandfather had been in the Kaiser's Guard. A picture of the Kaiser was given to the unit, and he said it should be hung in the outhouse. With that, he had to run for his life, and met my great grandmother in Colorado. He turned out to be a swindler, and left her after selling her prize horses.

Probably the first adult book I read was, "All Quiet on the Western Front."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 09:42 pm:

Hey Dennis, do you do leaded glass pieces or foiled? Though I've done some foiling I'm much more comfortable working with came. I've only worked with a few windows that were all zinc came. Though soldering is a little different I liked what it looked like when I was finished. My favorite part is designing, then cutting and fitting the glass the next would be cutting came and the thing I love to hate the most is puttying. I mix my own putty. I've got a recipe that was passed on from a past employer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 09:50 pm:

Ricks -
My grandmother was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1902. Her father (like all fit men) had served his required military duty in the army in the 1890's and had since begun a family. In 1904, he was called back to the colors, even though he now had five children and a thriving business. The next boat to New York City with all seven members of the Blass family aboard and the Marshall V. Daut story begins in Muscatine, Iowa - a GREAT distance from the Saxon king and his army! I imagine a lot of people in the USA of German heritage can claim their families left the Fatherland for the same reason!
This photo shows a Saxon soldier (an ACTUAL soldier!), whose mates put him up to posing for this picture, according to the handwriting on the backside. It says: "I didn't want the War!" and he's eating barbed wire from the can. Not ALL Germans thought the War was a good idea, you know!
MarshallSaxon soldier


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Friday, November 16, 2012 - 10:14 pm:

Marshall, I don't know the whole story but I can tell you there was a lake North of my Dad's farm named Munger Lake. The Story I remember is that there was a couple brothers named Munger who moved from Germany in the early 1900's to grow potatoes on the edge of this small lake. They farmed there for many years until things started to happen that kicked off the 1st World War. I don't believe the United States was even in the war yet and the brothers went back to Germany. I remember going to the little lake in the 1960's and was surprised how far it was from any passable road and I remember how big the fields were. Of course in that part of the state the trees are very thick and the forest covers the entire Northern part of the state. My Dad's hay field was barely able to give enough hay to support 20 milk cows, a few calves and a couple horses. And some years we had to put hay up on shares with out neighbors. If we could have gone in and cut hay on the fields the Mungers left behind we would have had an over abundance of hay. The problem we would have had was that there was no access to the fields. As I grew older I was shocked at how many farms with nice fields we would come across out in the woods from before the roads were put in. Now the whole area is full of housing and I can't tell you how disappointing it is to know of all that's gone. Forgive my rambling. I have a tendency to get carried away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Susanne on Saturday, November 17, 2012 - 12:53 am:

You mean there's something OTHER than old cars?? ;-)

Truthfully, since my early teens (thanks to the unknowing influence of some family friends - particularly this one couple - way back when) my life's kinda revolved around not just old vehicles, but living history, from Renfaire and SCA stuff to Gaskells Balls in Oakland and Dickensian events to the "modern" (OK, well T-era) Modern stuff. I restored my own sewing machines (a model 66 Singer treadle and a model 99 Electric - both from 1923), and learned to sew my own garb on them. It's probably the reason my ex and I bought a house that was built as a cover for a prohibition-era production still, and my current honey and I bought a mid 19th century cabin and smithy up off the Nobles Immigrant Trail. Regrets? Not on your life!!!

I'm also (don't fall over!) a former competition shooter, and still go out and burn powder when I get the chance. My first love (along with Fast T's) is Trap and 5-spot (Since about 13 or so), tho I'm getting more into bullseye pistol and steel silhouette shooting.

And motorcycles... tho recently I've gone from "modern iron" to older stuff, it's always been street bikes, from Honda 450's to Goldwings to FLT's to my current nemesis, a "rolling basket" '21 pocketvalve FD Harley.

I do other things too (nice having time once again!!), collect turn of the century books (particularly travel and highway related) and Radio Gear (AA-5's and earlier), do scenic photography, Ham Radio, yadayadayada...

Too bad I still have to work - I could do SO much more!!! --giggles--


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Pletcher on Sunday, November 18, 2012 - 01:17 pm:

I've been studying flintlocks for quite a few years. Like Model T's, good flintlocks are very interesting mechanically. The best, still, are originals from the early 1800s.
Regards,
Pletch


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Pletcher on Sunday, November 18, 2012 - 01:35 pm:

I tried to add a photo and hope it will work this time. (evidently I have more to learn about posting photos.)

Lancaster Co. Dickert style


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 11:06 am:

It's gotten hard to find flintlocks for the most part. A lot of them have been altered to cap and ball. Although they were done during the 19th century they're still not as big a deal as the flintlocks. I've got an old 14 gauge double that was built by William Chance and Sons prior to 1850 that was converted. It's a wall hanger but I think it's kind of neat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 11:42 am:

Larry did you build that colonial longrifle? I'm into flintlocks myself.
Mike they got all kinda flintlocks at Track of the wolf in Elk River MN.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 04:08 pm:

My grandpa still has what he calls a "matchlock" hanging on the wall. He's 94 and he said his dad had owned it before he (my grandpa) was born. Other than that, he doesn't know (or remember) where his dad got it originally.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Pletcher on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 07:37 pm:

This rifle is not an original. Mike Miller made this one to my specifications - like sights for aging eyes, etc. I have a couple of guns in progress, but no comparison to this one. Mike builds beautiful guns that are also great shooters.

Regards,
Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 07:46 pm:

Oh I did'nt figure it to be original, I was making reference to the style of rifle it is. How big is the bore? Any stories of what ye can hit with it? I ain't too good with mine!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 08:01 pm:

Hey Daniel, if convenient and more importantly if you "want to", take a picture of it and post it or email. I could give u at the very least a half as$ opinion of what it is. Better yet I bet some others round here might know more than me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 08:52 pm:

Hey Dexter. I sure will the next time I see him. He lives a couple hours away but I try to get down there at least a couple times a year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 09:04 pm:

Cool Daniel!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 09:22 pm:

I think Marshall grossly understated his interests, at one time, he had the best collection of German uniforms from the First World War, and is a contributor to some of the best books on the subject of World War One coming out of Europe (I get a chance to see some of the contributions as Maggie and I proof read for the author).
Some of the photographs Marshall has now trade for a higher price than the real uniforms did just a couple of decades ago, but the amount of information one can get from a simple period photo is often great, that is proven on this forum when a photo of a T is presented.
This is a great forum for the sharing of information.
Best
Gus


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Pletcher on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 09:46 pm:

The lock is a Chambers with a Rice .50 caliber barrel. the triggers are Davis, but they have been reworked enough that Tim at Davis couldn't tell it was his at first. I have always been partial to the early Lancaster style and particularly Jacob
Dickert's guns.

I have a computer setup (borrowed from high school physics) that allows timing these locks. If you are flintlock guy, check out some of the articles on www.blackpowdermag.com.
Regards,
Pletch


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 09:51 pm:

Cool Pletch,! I wanna say those rice barrels have the button radius groove rifling in the bore, the good stuff!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 10:00 pm:

Dexter when I was down at Track of the Wolf in Elk River I saw a couple old flintlocks not many. They had plenty new replicas but most was cap and ball or cap and ball conversions. And their prices for the replicas were a little out of my range. The guy that was working in there that day didn't know squat and when I walked in he tried to sell me a modern inline stainless steel gun with a composite stock. After all I'd heard about the place I figured I was going to see something. Not!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 10:12 pm:

Hello, A. Gustav!
Thank you for the kind words! I'm overwhelmed! So, you're into Model T's, too?! Small world, eh?
Until things blew up with the ^%$#* publisher in August, it had been a pleasurable 18 month experience sharing writing duties with Johan on our book. He was very easy to work with, highly knowledgeable and quite receptive to my stupid suggestions how to "improve" our book. But because of some questionable, insulting and shady practices perpetrated by the publisher - as well as outright lies told to Johan and me - I requested that Johan remove my name as co-author, but he could keep what I had written and include the thousands of photos I had submitted. He will appear as the sole author, which is only right and proper since it was initially his book. So, far, though, the publisher has not removed my name from his advertising page. I fear the publisher will dilute and cut out much of our hard work and extensive research just to make an extra buck. A sad ending to a promising project.
Please give my best to Johan the next time you correspond with him! He deserves better than what he'll get from the publisher in Pennsylvania.
Regards,
Marshall


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 10:13 pm:

Lets see, I'm sort of a multi interest guy really. Model T's (of course) and I'd like to lay my hands on a nice (meaning unrestored) 1930 or 31 Model A Town Sedan a real Baby Lincoln. antique firearms both cap & ball pistols and muzzle stuffer's, also large bore field artillery pieces (ie cannon).

Restoration and tuning of antique automated musical instruments (including automated pipe organs and player pianos)

Restoration of antique clocks and watches, but I do a lot of hall clocks (weight and spring), it's even more fun when I have to splice or make entirely new wheels (gears).

Collecting 78 RPM records, antique cameras, tools and forge equipment, blade smithing, forge welding.

And this might sound a bit obscure, but I really like making IPB's (Illustrated Parts Breakdowns or Exploded Views) of components from my car, camera's, clocks and watches, musical instruments and guns, its even more fun if I get a real drawing to work from, like this 1944 "Chicago Typewriter" I recently did for a friend (that was fun!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 10:18 pm:

Well Mike, I guess the web site is better than shop itself!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 10:38 pm:

Hey Marshall,
I had heard something about publishing problems, but did not realize that it was so bad. Johan is great to work with, I first dealt with him when I acquired a WWI Belgian uniform for my collection several years ago ( as I think of it, it was nearly a decade ago). I almost had the opportunity to see your collection many years ago when at SOS, Dave Moser explained that I would have to be blind folded and then dumped naked at a New Jersey rest area afterward for security reasons. Sadly I did not have enough time, because the process sounded almost as adventurous as the chance to see the collection.
Best
Gus


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 - 10:59 pm:

Wow,I allways wanted a Thompson but them things are pricey.For sure pricey for the drum!
Never heard them called Chicago Typewriters before though.Rumor has it there is 1 in the family that was picked up from the road side by my great grandfather.But I aint never saw it.Street sweeper was the name I allways heard applied to it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep NZ on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 12:56 am:

i know a forum that might like to see the Illustrated Parts View thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Ashton Rosenkrans on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 10:13 am:

I just bought a straight magazine Thompson replica for my '42 Jeep from a company called Denix in Spain who do movie prop replicas. Very nice piece, made to original plans but non-firing or fireable. Same weight and heft and alot cheaper (and less hassle) than a real one. I also have an M1 carbine and Garand from the same group on board. Looking for a Thompson scabbard which may end up costing more than the gun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Ashton Rosenkrans on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 10:18 am:

I just bought a straight magazine Thompson replica for my '42 Jeep from a company called Denix in Spain who do movie replicas. Made from original blueprints except non-fireable, it has the same weight and heft and looks great, plus its alot cheaper and less hassle with the local mounties. I also have an M1 carbine and Garand on board. I'm looking for a Thompson scabbard which I may end up paying more for than the gun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 11:13 am:

Old friend of mine came into a Thompson many years ago, back in the 70s. I think he still has it. Although I havea couple of long guns and a so-called "assault" rifle, I prefer my pea shooters for back woods outings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 10:17 pm:

I hope none of the people that bitch about off topic threads are reading any of this. They don't deserve it!
Damn has this been interesting reading!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 10:37 pm:

soldier


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 10:39 pm:

soldier


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 10:42 pm:

and when I'm not doing the above, I'm meeting famous musicians....

randy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 10:48 pm:

Ya I'm a reenactor too. Which confederate outfit are ye representing?. We most often do a federal impression. The 114th New York who served down here. I need to become motivated and post photo's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 12:50 am:

Famous musicians? That looks like Michael Caine...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 08:45 am:

That's Randy Newman....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 08:47 am:

At the time it was the 26th NC. I've portrayed them, plus a couple of Federal units: 19th Maine and 14th NJ.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Walker on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 09:06 am:

William Vanderburg, what's your favorite Randy Newman song?

Momma Told Me Not to Come?
Roll with the Punches?
The Kingfish?
Redneck?
Louisiana 1927?
Falling in Love?
Short People?
You Lied?
It's Money That Matters?

Like you, I enjoy music and have the great fortune of living a hop from Nashville and enjoying the friendship of many writers and performers.

Otherwise, I spend extra time working on an old Folk Victorian yeoman farmer's house. If I was smarter I'd have torn the thing down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Cassara Long Island, NY on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 09:13 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 10:46 am:

David,

I pretty much like all of them. He's signing my "Little Criminals" album which has two favs: Short People and Jolly Coppers on Parade.

I like the backing vocals by the Eagles on this particular album.

Birmingham is another favorite which I think is on my "Good Old Boys" album, and I Love LA on the "Trouble in Paradise" album.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 11:05 am:

Thompsons, Boy does that bring back memories! Had 2 in Viet Nam left behind by the French and recaptured from the NVA. Loved those guns! Got a semi-auto version when I got home but sadly trade it for antique car parts several years later....regret....regret.

Howard DennisThompsons


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 06:03 pm:

Nice Howard. All I got that wasn't U.S. issue was an SKS and you'd never see me put my life on the line for one of those pieces of crap. I talk to a lot of guys around here who like them for deer hunting but i think it's because they've never shot a real weapon. I would love to have a Thompson. Better yet I'd like to have a B.A.R. or an M60. What the heck I'll take a truck mount quad 50 they were fun,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 07:35 pm:

Thanks Mike, To be truthful from what I found the SKS and it"s big brother the AK47 were as good as our arms except the Russians and Chinese couldn't make good hammer springs, we used to find them abandoned with broken springs. I never saw a jammed one but can't say that about the M16! Pardon the double posting, I'm trying to learn to post pictures better.

Howard DennisThompsons


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 08:12 pm:

Being a college student I don't have time to pursue my other hobbies like I would, but I do have my hobbies :-) I'm really an all period history buff, but i'm really into the world wars. I recently started a world war firearm collection. Here, the quality isn't too good, but here's a video of my first rifle: a lete period WW2 Soviet M44 Mosin Nagant rifle.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_n6p0ew9tu4&feature=plcp


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 08:17 pm:

Howard, in my opinion the AK was a formidable weapon that could get the job done. I had an SKS when I was over there. I wasn't impressed. I considered sending it home in my whole baggage but didn't think it was worth hanging on too. But then I think a lot of the difference was where they were made. I never had a problem with my M16 for the most part. But then I took care of it. Most of the problem with the M16 was self inflicted. Keep the magazines clean and when you get a chance field strip it and wipe it down and it was there when you needed it. The biggest problem though was being able to do that stuff. When the shit would hit the fan, you were in the mud and charles was breathing down your throat, you never had a couple minutes to even wipe it down it could get shaky. But that's where keeping the magazines clean helped out a bunch. I don't know why we couldn't have consulted with those guys a little better to determine when the sneaky little bustards were going to hit us.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Boothroyd, Victoria, B.C. on Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 08:46 pm:

I collect, conserve or restore antique clocks; anyone have a good dial for a Seth Thomas #2 regulator to fit the 77B movement?

Regards,

SteveB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 12:00 am:

Hey Matthew, I have one of them M44 rifles. What a great shooter! And cheap frickin' ammo too. Had two spam cans (880 rounds) sealed in the original crate delivered by UPS for about $180 prepaid.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 10:32 am:

I had a Russian SKS 7.62 NATO Round, with a bayonet attached. Looked practically brand new. I traded it for a low serial numbered Garand, which I later sold to an acquaintance of mine. I gave up going out in the field...I'm a paperpusher now....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew David Maiers on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 12:46 pm:

Mausers all the way!!!!! i have an 8x57 6.5x55 and 7x57.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 01:22 pm:

I'm into guns too. I have a '53 International Harvester M1 Garand. The rest of my stuff is all newer. AK-47, a couple AR-15s, some shotguns, and a bunch of pistols. I also have a 150yd shooting range and a clay pigeon thrower in my back yard.

My son is getting his first .22 rifle tomorrow for his 5th birthday. I'll be sure to get some pictures when we shoot together.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 01:43 pm:

Steve, here's the only clock I own - a Seth Thomas kitchen clock. Purchased by my grandfather for my grandmother sometime after he came home from the war.

Can you date this and tell me what the purpose of that little red dot/hole is below the 12?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 01:47 pm:

Envy the private range, Derek! We used to do a lot of shooting over the years behind my parents' house and then a few years ago, my dad decided that non one could bring guns on the property anymore.

Most times though, we go find a logging road that's still open and shoot up on a landing somewhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Floyd Voie - Chehalis, Washington on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 01:57 pm:

Danial,
The red dot is there to let you know the power has gone off.
After the RR quit using the Grandfather clocks they used the style with the dot. That was so some railroader wouldn't come in to the station and reset his watch by comparing time with a stopped clock!
Nice clock!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 02:05 pm:

Thanks Floyd! I always wondered what that was for. When my mom gave me the clock 15 years ago, I asked her and she didn't know.

The clock works flawlessly and hasn't been serviced since 1980 when my mom took ownership of it. Probably longer - if at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 02:54 pm:

On the back of the clock next to the knob to set the time there should be a knob or pin to set the dot back to white.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 07:20 pm:

Thanks Jeff. Hard to see in the pic, but on this particular ST clock, the time-set knob and that pin both stick down from the bottom in front of the cord. And now I know what that pin is for...grin...

Any idea what year/s these were sold? If my mother's story is accurate, my grandfather bought this for my grandmother right after he returned from the war (1945) for the house they had just bought then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Floyd Voie - Chehalis, Washington on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 08:09 pm:

Danial
I would say your mother's story is right on!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 09:14 pm:

As a "budding chemist" I turn bourbon into urine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 10:00 pm:

John Aldrich, you're a credit to your profession. God bless you for the time you dedicate to the betterment of mankind.

I use to have Remingtons. I had a model 1100, an 870 wingmaster, a model 700 stainless in 280 caliber, a model 700 classic in 223 caliber, a model 788 in .243 caliber, a savage 110 in 30-06 but it was a piece of garbage. Then I had a 20 gauge Ithica, and a 20 gauge model 500 mossberg. Then in one move I sold the whole works at an auction. The only gun I had after that was a Marlin 22 magnum bolt action for cats and rabbits and a marlin 30-30. Now they're gone too. Then after getting rid of them I bought hand guns. A ruger 9mm, a baretta 22 LR, a taurus 38 sp revolver and a Colt Officer ACP. Now all I've got left is the Colt. I seriously doubt I'll have very many guns again. This is the first time in years I've lived somewhere that I don't dare shoot. So I've got my cars instead.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, November 23, 2012 - 10:09 pm:

Most red dot clocks reset to white when you set them while they're plugged in and running. For accurate setting have the clock unplugged, tune your radio to WWV (5 or 10 meter short wave band) to get the time, and plug it in at the appropriate time to start the second hand. Then use the knob to set the hour and minute hands, which automatically resets the dot to white.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Boothroyd, Victoria, B.C. on Saturday, November 24, 2012 - 12:47 am:

Danial, looks like others beat me to the punch regarding the red / white dot.
According to sources,many Seth Thomas electric clocks of the 1940's - 1950's have a 4 digit date code stamped on the case, just below where the cord enters.
The first 2 digits are the year and the second 2 digits are the month.
e.g. 4511 would indicate November 1945.
Many older Seth Thomas clocks (1881 - 1918)have date codes stamped on the rear of the cases where the year is in reverse, followed by the month.
Hope this helps date your ST.

Regards,

Steveb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Saturday, November 24, 2012 - 12:13 pm:

Gotta love WWV, Steve. I actually have fond memories of that station. That's what my dad had playing for years, in his observatory for logging accurate times for the variable star observations he sent in.

Don't see a date code, other Steve. Maybe rubbed off.

Thanks for the help guys...sorry for hijacking an otherwise fun thread for a clock....grin...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Alexander in Albion, Maine on Saturday, November 24, 2012 - 12:47 pm:

I play with full sized trains. Come see us this summah for a great ride and don't forget to eat some lobstah too ! Bill, Downeast Scenic Railroad, Ellsworth, ME. Check out our website.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Saturday, November 24, 2012 - 01:30 pm:

Here's the link....... :-)

http://www.downeastscenicrail.org/ride/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Sunday, December 16, 2012 - 06:13 pm:

well I pulled the cover off and took this pic of 2 of the engines I just finished.I had to make a spot on the spare work bench to put them and it is cluttered.I had to make room to work on more.I keep them covered up till I can get them on skids and in a trailer or whatever for proper storage.
Here is my 1934 Model K and a 6B-H briggs engines.
The 6B-H is 1 of Briggs first vertical shaft engines made of aluminum for civilian use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 12:02 am:

Mack I wish you lived close. I'd give you this old Briggs and Stratton I've got from sometime around the 1940's. It's got good compression and it's all there. Just doesn't have any spark. I think I talked to you about it once before and told you it's a model K but that's not true. It's actually a model B. I don't want it because I want to put an electric start motor on the air compressor it's on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 05:09 am:

My other hobby, for my house, barn finds.
one day I burn in I hope.pics.jpg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 09:58 am:

Ake -

If you're ever in Minneapolis, I'll give you a tour of the Turnblad Mansion of the American Swedish Institute. (The Swedish King and Queen were at the American Swedish Institute in October to dedicate the new addition.)

http://www.asimn.org/

The mansion was completed in 1908 - there are 11 kakelugnar (tile stoves for those who don't speak Swedish). Although they are hooked up and fully functional, they have never been used.

Here are a couple photos of two of the kakelugnar - my dad was giving a tour at the time:

1

2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 10:13 am:

It looks like the American Swedish Institute has a Dane on its wall. Isn't that Victor Borge?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 10:22 am:

The first engine I ever bought when I got interested in the old engine hobby was a B.Still have it.I went to Denton threshers reunion in 1988 with a load of old cb radios and "junque",sold it all for 200 bucks.I then bought the engine for 40 bucks running.It had and still has a gaudy 2 inch 2 foot tall exhaust pipe on it.Sounds MEAN when it runs.
It will be getting a freshing up shortly and will start being hauled to shows again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 10:26 am:

Sure looks like him, doesn't it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 10:27 am:

You are correct - that is "the Great Dane" Victor Borge on the wall.

The American Swedish Institute doesn't limit itself to Swedish history and culture or Americans of Swedish descent. It also branches out and celebrates Scandinavian and Nordic culture in general.

At the time the photo was taken, there was a display and a series of lectures on the life of Victor Borge. There were a number of personal artifacts including a report card from grammar school (which I thought was the most interesting of everything displayed) and props and costumes from his act such as an automobile seat belt for a piano bench.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 10:34 am:

I have several LPs by Victor Borge. I always thought that he was extremely funny. I can remember when my age had been in double digits for just a few years, my grandparents subscribed to the Saturday Evening Post. When we went to their house, I read every issue. In one of them, there was an article by Borge describing his arrival in the US and the challenge of learning English. He told of leaving his hotel one morning, and the doorman saying, "Spring in the air today, Mr. Borge." So he jumped as high as he could... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 10:41 am:

I have a 1929 Mason & Hamlin Ampico B reproducing grand piano, and about 600+ rolls to go with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 01:08 pm:

Hej Larry,
I have an 88note upright player (made from two pianos) a Cable Recordo upright and an Acoustagrande baby grand with a Welte Licensee--and way too many rolls! My wife just picked up a box of rolls from a local antique shop for $25, there's at least 5 Welte rolls, one Ampico roll and a mess '0 88 note rolls, including Tiger Rag by J. L. Cooke. Not a bad haul! Like I really needed more rolls. . . Although, I think you have more than I!
And then there's all the American Flyer trains, and AC Gilbert stuff to go with them. . . I also have a few wall clocks around here that I need to rebuild, and my wife's Grandmother Clock (from the 1970s, it's not a real antique).
Now if I just didn't have to work for a living, I might get around to these projects. . .
maybe even do something with the steamboat launch engine I have . . . .
T'
David D.
PS I didn't mention the Theatre Pipe Organ I'm helping install in the local 1928 theatre.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Clark - Glendale, WI on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 02:43 pm:

Car related but sure is fun!! Takes a lot of time though...
Not a T but sure fun!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 06:00 pm:

When not casting old car parts I'm restoring early outboard motors. Fabricating and casting many of the damaged or missing parts.

outboard motors

outboard motors

Fabricated a brass gas tank and cast the aluminum exhaust manifold for this early Spinaway motor plus cast the motor stands to mount them to. Bob

outboard motors


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 07:01 pm:

Did not know there was anything to do outside the model T hobby, wife says I can't afford it! KB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester Lowery - Hendersonville TN on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 08:25 pm:

Well I sure have read a lot of interesting articles tonight. I thought I had an interesting life but now I may question it. I've been playing Bluegrass, Country and Gospel music since the age of six. Have, as most musicians,clooected many guitars such as Gibson J45, J200, Martin HD28, and many more including my grandads old cheap Supertone probably cost around $8.00 back in the 30's. I don't know if many of you musicians have heard or played one, but about six years ago I purchased a CA Acoustic for the road and now its about the only one I play and record with. Fiddles, Banjo's, Harps, Mandolins and now I have installed my own recording studio. My wife,daughter,son,myself and now my oldest grandson all perform at festivals and Churches around Nashville Tn area, Ky, and Al. With three CD's recorded now, it still is such a pleasure to stand on stage with your family and perform. The only other thing in my life besides Wife, Children and Grandchildren is my Hotrods and Model T. Hope to play with some of you other musicians in the future....Chester


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester Lowery - Hendersonville TN on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 08:28 pm:

Well I sure have read a lot of interesting articles tonight. I thought I had an interesting life but now I may question it. I've been playing Bluegrass, Country and Gospel music since the age of six. Have, as most musicians,clooected many guitars such as Gibson J45, J200, Martin HD28, and many more including my grandads old cheap Supertone probably cost around $8.00 back in the 30's. I don't know if many of you musicians have heard or played one, but about six years ago I purchased a CA Acoustic for the road and now its about the only one I play and record with. Fiddles, Banjo's, Harps, Mandolins and now I have installed my own recording studio. My wife,daughter,son,myself and now my oldest grandson all perform at festivals and Churches around Nashville Tn area, Ky, and Al. With three CD's recorded now, it still is such a pleasure to stand on stage with your family and perform. The only other thing in my life besides Wife, Children and Grandchildren is my Hotrods and Model T. Hope to play with some of you other musicians in the future....Chester


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester Lowery - Hendersonville TN on Monday, December 17, 2012 - 08:34 pm:

Sorry, Didn't intend on hitting it twice....I was trying to correct the spelling of collected and just screwed up....Chester


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, December 23, 2012 - 12:53 pm:

I guess you could call my other hobby "Old Stuff in General", which includes Model T Fords and lots of other things. This morning I finished cleaning up a Rayo lamp which I bought a year or two ago at an auction for the 1911 price of $4, though in 1911 it would have come with a tripod for holding a shade. The Rayo is a pretty common lamp because Standard Oil gave them away free with the purchase of fifteen gallons of kerosene. Not surprisingly, they're considered something of a fuel hog, a trait that would serve the interests of Standard Oil. These lamps are nickel-plated brass, so rust is not a problem. Today you often see them stripped to the brass, electrified, and sold for obscene prices. They take a chimney a little smaller at the base than today's lamps, so I didn't have a prayer of buying a chimney here in Podunk. Fortunately a lot of things like that are sold online, and I got a new chimney for just about twice the price of the lamp, $8.38. I don't use kerosene light often, but it's handy during power outages.

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Sunday, December 23, 2012 - 02:05 pm:

At this moment in time, I am in the my warehouse at work restoring a 1909 hotel lobby Van Dorn Iron works US Postal letter box for Carol. Came out of some old hotel in San Diego that was torn down in the 70s. Carol knows the name of it. I think she has a pic somewhere of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Sunday, December 23, 2012 - 03:54 pm:

Mike I would love to have that B.Good running engines for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison on Sunday, December 23, 2012 - 05:21 pm:

Mack, maybe this spring I'll take it off and meet you half way and souvenir it to you. If we meet in the right place maybe we can find some other model t guys and make a day or two out of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill dugger on Sunday, December 23, 2012 - 05:42 pm:

Well my "Other Hobby is model airplanes. I have a Cessna 172 Skyhawk something and now now I am putting together a 34 1/2 wing span Spirit Of St. L:oius balsa model. Will be RC'd and hope in a few weeks one. I have 71 inch model that will be next. No photos yet. Later for that.
Fun but tedious and time consuming, but who care it keeps me off the street out of the bars and Brothels, I cant say we have any here where I live or that I know of.
Merry Christmas to one and all, and a very Happy New Year and hope it will be a very good year in 2013.
It has snowed and rained and the wind has blown and, as for the Rain, my niece said the last time I was in Germany and we were on the way back to the air port, I made the statement it is Raining and she spoke up and said it is not raining the "angels are crying because you are leaving Germany on the way to the USA. Well that is my story and I am going to stick to it!!!!!

Bill D
Redding, Ca.


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