Cleaning Fuel Tank

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2012: Cleaning Fuel Tank
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Tuesday, December 25, 2012 - 11:37 pm:

I remember hearing something about adding pee gravel to a gas tank and rolling it around to clean rust out. If I have this correct how much pee gravel do I add to the tank? Also, how much rolling around does it take? I realize that depends on how rusty, but could you give a rough estimate?
Thanks for any help,
Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, December 25, 2012 - 11:54 pm:

A bunch of small chain would be easier to get out of the tank when you're done. Strap the tank to a tractor wheel jacked off the ground, or some other slow-turning wheel, and let the rotation tumble the chain inside. As you say, how long it takes depends on what it's like when you start. Just check the progress occasionally until it looks good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew David Maiers on Tuesday, December 25, 2012 - 11:55 pm:

last i peed gravel i had to go to the doctor...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 11:12 am:

Pee gravel works, as long as it is clean. I have also used small lock washers, and square nuts, with carburetor cleaner. The sharp edges of the washers or nuts would probably work better than the pee gravel. I just sit in a chair and shake the tank around for a while.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 11:14 am:

Do not use pee gravel, it is stinky, it is better to use pea gravel, but the chain idea is even better as you sill know that you have gotten it all out.
Best
Gus


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 12:16 pm:

I've had good luck lately by first taking the tank to the carwash and spraying the inside with the hot soapy water, then putting in nuts and bolts, small sockets, sheet rock screws, etc.
I gotta admit though, I like the chain idea better.
After the shake & turn part I flush with the garden hose for at least 10 minutes and then rinse with either carb cleaner, gasoline or acetone (or a mixture of all three) and let it dry in the sun for a couple hours.
The first one I did was in '85 was real bad and it is still clean.
You can also use CLR with hot water 50-50% when you do the shake part.
Leave it in the tank for half hour & keep turning., then flush with water real good & let dry in the sun a few hours or longer & add some carb cleaner before putting gas back in it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Thomas on Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 12:20 pm:

Most folks find that buying a new tank is the best option. They are relatively cheap and a lot less expensive than being stranded along the road....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 12:57 pm:

Willis Jenkins:

It has been a long time since I ever used pea gravel and shook the tank. I for many years have taken the tanks (if needed) to a radiator shop. The good radiator shop will have a large tank that has chemicals and VIBRATES. I forget what they are called. NOTE not all radiator shops have the vibrating tank so ask. Apparently the vibrations is used on very dirty radiators.

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 01:18 pm:

Unless you've got a 26/27 cowl tank, which is a different story.

http://www.modeltford.com/pl.aspx?t=s&v=gas%20tank&page=1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 10:49 pm:

Steve,

The chain idea sounds very interesting. Easier to know that you have it all out when done. Are there any baffles in the tank to worry about getting the chain around to all parts of the tank? Thanks for all the input,

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 10:54 pm:

You don't want anything aggressive enough to knock the baffles loose. Their just tacked in there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 04:52 am:

Hello
...I used a cement mixer, with good results


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ex trooper on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 08:05 am:

Get a few pcs a foot long of "sash" chain. Thats the flat stuff that has the links folded one into another. Usually copper plated. A big box (5 lbs) of .177 caliber BBs is good too. Add those and a quart or two of kerosene in Akes' mixer will have the insides shiny clean.
While on the subject: what the heck is the thread size for a round tank cap? I need to make a brass one for a pals speedster. Thanks. troop


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 12:26 pm:

Gas cap is 2 1/8" x 14 thrd.

Be sure to drill a vent hole too,unless he's got accessory air pump for holding pressure in the gas tank!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 12:48 pm:

Willis,

"Are there any baffles in the tank to worry about getting the chain around to all parts of the tank?"

Yes, there are baffles. I'm not sure what clearance they allow for passing chain links through. Depends a bunch on the chain size I suppose. I would hate to get a chain all the way in the other end compartment and not be able to blindly fish it back out.

Is a new tank really out of the question for you? In the long run, it's easier, faster, a lot less frustrating and will last far longer than any "clean-up" attempt will.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ex trooper on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 01:49 pm:

Thanks Dan! Ive not been able to find anything other than a T gas cap to fit and really want to make a nice brass one, with balls and all! troop


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 02:06 pm:

A nice clean tank is certainly a good thing to have, but not absolutely necessary. Assuming it's NOT a 26-27cowl tank, get as much loose stuff out as you can and then buy the screen they make that inserts into the top of your sediment bulb. Do NOT confuse what I'm talking about with the flat screen on the outlet of the sediment bulb. This thing goes in the top of the sediment bulb and protrudes up into the tank. It is effectively a 'pipe' made of very fine screen. It will filter out anything large enough to clog anything further downstream. As long as the old tank is not leaking, I'd just clean out the loose stuff and use the screen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff V on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 09:40 am:

I've used muriatic acid (available at paint supply places) to clean tanks followed by a tank sealer by Eastwood (I'ld have to look up exactly what it was). The acid seemed to work pretty well (muriatic acid is very weak, but still a bit of a hazard to work with)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 04:17 pm:

To add to what Hal Davis said, I have found that (if you're not a "purist") a Universal type glass sediment bowl that is sold at John Deere and farm supply type stores does a great job of filtering out any rust & scale that might otherwise cause problems in carburetor jet(s). I and other forum users have used them very successfully; in fact, I got the idea from another forum member whose name I have forgotten.

Anyway, this little sediment bowl costs less than $20.00 and besides the 2 built-in fine mesh screens preventing any particles too large to pass harmlessly thru' carburetor jet, it also has a very handy shut-off valve built in. Believe me, no matter how clean you think your tank might be, you'll eventually see particles that become trapped in the easy-to-clean glass bowl.

Wish I could think of the forum fellow's name that tipped me off to this Universal glass sediment bowl for tractors, but they really work great! For what it's worth,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ex trooper on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 07:47 pm:

[IMG]http://i50.tinypic.com/xr2ad.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i46.tinypic.com/6f1le9.jpg[/IMG]

troop


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 07:58 pm:

Could have been me Harold. I remember the post and entered into it because I had one on my '23. Their readily available at small engine repair shops which is where I was working at the time. Silver Streak and Oregon sell them but you might find them at auto stores too depending on the age of the counter person. The tank fitting & fuel line fitting are the same size as the T's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ex trooper on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 10:10 pm:

Fleet Farm... $12.95 troop


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Monday, December 31, 2012 - 08:16 am:

A new tank is not what I'm looking for, but to preserve the old one. It's about the real steel. I could also build a Model T from all new parts, but there is no historical connection to the past. To hold a real part in your hand and wonder who crafted it back in the day. That is what it's really about for me.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Monday, December 31, 2012 - 08:40 am:

Like they said above, pea gravel is the best route to go, because of the baffles.


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